Twitter’s t.co: A Take on Other URL Shortener
By on June 9th, 2010

We have already seen Twitter shorten links in Direct messages. Now, it is expanding the same technology into status updates. This is one feature users have missed and complained about for too long and finally, Twitter is rolling it out as a feature for regular use.

This service has existed for direct messages which were shortened with twt.tl to prevent phishing and other forms of scams. This was achieved by blacklisting links from user generated reports and feedback. Now, the newly bought t.co domain will serve the feature to status updates.

The inclusion of this feature was hinted at, at the Chirp developer conference this year. This link shortening aims at improving the generated short links by keeping them meaningful and short at the same time. This would also help Twitter analyze the popularity of a link and roll out features based on it.

Not only this, the feature once integrated into the Twitter API will allow developers integrate newer tools and features into their applications and this will enhance the Twitter ecosystem as a whole. The developers will also have a more flexible choice on generating the shortened links.

The service is available for testing to selected Twitter employees only though; Twitter aims at making it available to the public soon. Once this feature is made available, I wonder what bit.ly will do to keep its charm.

(Source)

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Author: Chinmoy Kanjilal Google Profile for Chinmoy Kanjilal
Chinmoy Kanjilal is a FOSS enthusiast and evangelist. He is passionate about Android. Security exploits turn him on and he loves to tinker with computer networks. He rants occasionally at Techarraz.com. You can connect with him on Twitter @ckandroid.

Chinmoy Kanjilal has written and can be contacted at chinmoy@techie-buzz.com.
  • http://www.qwitter-client.net Q

    The disturbing bit, and the reason I intend to specifically code around this T.Co shortener by sending my users to the displayed URL instead of the link. Twitter is simply trying to get user click data from people who use the API without even letting its users know (note how we're supposed to hide the link in the UI), and I for one won't stand for it.

 
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