Editorial: Will Windows 8 Boost or Bust Office Productivity?
By on September 5th, 2012

Windows 8 has opened up a whole new world of opportunities and speculation too. The pages of the Internet are completely flooded with new gadgets, tips, and speculation surrounding Microsoft’s newest operating system. I have to admit, I have mixed feelings about Microsoft’s prospects. In some ways, I feel like Microsoft represents the big bad corporate fat cat that tried every way it could to monopolize the software market. In other ways, I am really pulling for Microsoft to win on this one. Let’s face it, a lot of people make a lot of money because Microsoft developed a product they could support or develop apps for. With the U.S. economy in the tank, we desperately need a shot in the arm. As popular as Apple products are, how many people do you know who are making a great living off Apple products? I would wager that they are few and far between. Consumer oriented products are just not the boon to the economy in the long term that business oriented products are. I am sure Apple investors might disagree, but unless you have big bucks in the market, you’re probably not benefiting very much from Apple’s success.

Window 8 Logo

Now that I have had a chance to play with Windows 8 a little, I am starting to draw some of my own conclusions about it. I see that a lot of thought has been put into designing this OS, there are a lot of opportunities for both software and hardware makers, and I think this is going to be a royal nightmare for IT departments supporting business.

Thoughtful Design

Somewhere along the way, Microsoft started making assumptions that everyone was locked into their products and that consumers would hopelessly remain in the cycle of expensive software upgrades every few years. Unfortunately for Microsoft, they made a very decent OS when they made Windows XP. Windows XP simply worked. It worked fast as compared to Windows 2000. It was pretty simple to use. From an IT standpoint, it was very simple to administer on a domain. It wasn’t flawless, but it got the job done. This was a big problem for Microsoft because in order to keep the revenue stream alive, they decided it was time for everyone to jump to the latest and greatest OS. This is where Windows Vista entered the scene. Short of trying to sound insulting, Windows Vista was a poorly planned, poorly implemented flop. It was riddled with problems right out of the box. However, even it had been delivered in perfect working condition, it just didn’t offer anything upgrade worthy. As an IT manager, I would love to have had a Microsoft exec try to help me explain to my boss why I needed to upgrade 100 computers to Windows Vista because frankly, I saw no advantage whatsoever except for veiled threats that Microsoft would soon stop supporting Windows XP.

With the experience of the Vista debacle in their past, Microsoft seemed to take its time with the Windows 8 rollout and it shows. First of all, Windows 8 embraces a new age of technology based on tablets and smartphones. Though it is the nightmare of many IT security personnel, the “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) movement has changed the way people interface with the company network. Employees are more than willing to go out and get the device of their choice and use it for company business. Of course, the consumer market cannot be ignored either. Microsoft recognized that Apple and Google were making a fortune in this area and that every day Microsoft didn’t have a product in that vertical was a day of missed opportunity. Microsoft also had to ensure that they got this OS right, or else suffer the same fate that Vista did. Windows 8 is definitely a tablet friendly operating system. The design is gorgeous and it is pretty intuitive as a touchscreen OS. It also doubles as a desktop operating system. By clicking the “Desktop” tile on the main screen, you can get to a more classic looking screen where you can setup shortcuts and pretty wallpapers. This dual personality, I believe, is going to make it the most flexible operating system on the market. I really don’t see how Android or IOS will be able to even compete against it unless they come up with something radical soon.

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Author: Darrin Jenkins Google Profile for Darrin Jenkins
Darrin is an IT manager for a large electrical contractor in Louisville KY. He is married and has 3 kids. He loves helping people with their technology needs. He runs a blog called Say Geek!

Darrin Jenkins has written and can be contacted at darrin@techie-buzz.com.

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