5GB of Free Online File Storage with CloudDrive

I have more free storage space online than I know what to do with. I have SkyDrive, Google Docs, Dropbox, Ubuntu One, Drop.io and several others. That doesn’t mean I won’t accept more if it’s offered. In 2008, when Adobe offered 5GB of free space online for files, I snapped it up. Their service is called Adobe Acrobat Document Service. All you need is an email address and a password to use it. There was one major problem with it and I have not been using it. Adobe’s service only allows you to upload one file at a time.

Since you can only upload one file at a time, it takes too long to use their service. Most of the time, I use SkyDrive Explorer to upload files when I need cloud storage. This may change since I found a free program called CloudDrive. This freebie app let’s you upload multiple files into your Adobe Acrobat Documents account. Take a look at the CloudDrive application:


CloudDrive looks almost like a regular file window and you’ll have no trouble figuring it out. It allows you to create folders, but I did notice one problem with that. You can’t move files between folders easily. As far as I can tell, you have to download a file and then re-upload it into a different folder.

Other than that, I can’t see much wrong with this application.

[via DownloadSquad]

Download CloudDrive

http://www.driveoncloud.com/ (XP, Vista, 7)

Techie Buzz Verdict:

If you are going to use Adobe’s Acrobat Document Service, you are definitely going to want CloudDrive to help you upload multiple files and folders. CloudDrive is still very new and I’m hoping they’ll add a way to move files between folders soon. CloudDrive has quite a way to go before it’s as easy to use as SkyDrive Explorer or Dropbox.

Techie Buzz Rating: 3/5 (Good)

How To Create and Use System Restore Points

I often create backups of my registry files when I’m getting ready to try out new software. Lately, I’ve been setting System Restore Pointsas well. Why would I do this? Let’s ask Microsoft.

Quote from Microsoft: Every time you download or install a new game, application, or software update, you make changes to your computer. Sometimes that change may make your system unstable. Have you ever wanted to go back to the way it was? With System Restore, you can.(source)

What is a System Restore Point?

System Restore is a Windows feature that takes snapshots of the system files and registry at regular intervals or during important system events. The snapshots are stored as System Restore Points (SRP). If you run into a problem, you can often use a previous SRP to undo many of the changes to your system that created the problem.

It’s not fool proof. Sometimes it didn’t correct the problems I had. Most of the time, it does a good job as long as the Restore Point isn’t very old. Since it seems to be important to use a recent SRP, I often set my own SRP just before installing software. I’ll show you how to do this below.

How to Create a System Restore Point

In Windows XP, use your start menu to go to Programs > Accessories > System Tools > System Restore.

You should see this:


Set the button on Create a restore pointand click Next. At the next screen, you’ll be able to type in a name or description for your restore point.


In Vista and Win7, you can set an SRP just as easily.

Click your Start button, then type restore, then click the entry that says Create a restore point.


Next you’ll see a screen like this:


Click the Createbutton and you’ll get a window that will let you choose a description for the new SRP.


How to Use a Restore Point to Recover from a Problem

In WinXP, you can use the Start menu as shown above to find the System Restore settings.

When you get to the System Restore panel, select Restore my computer to an earlier time.

You’ll get a window that will let you select a restore point.


Once you have an SRP selected, hit the Nextbutton to start the recovery. You’ll get a screen with some info on it and you’ll have to click Nextone final time. The computer will restart.

In Vista and Win7, you can click the start button and type restore. You’ll need to click the entry labeled Restore your computer to an earlier time.


You’ll get a window up that let’s you start System Restore. Then you’ll be able to select an SRP to recover.


Once you have one selected, hit the Nextbutton, and then the Finishbutton to confirm it. Your computer will reboot and hopefully everything will be better.


Now that you have the general idea, don’t forget that setting a System Restore Point could save you time and trouble when you try out new software. If you have any suggestions or questions, be sure to comment below.

How to Speed Up Windows Disk Cleanup

disk-cleanup-icon Cleaning out the junk files on your PC is something you should do on a regular basis. Microsoft has included a file cleaning utility in Windows, and it’s called Disk Cleanup. Running Disk Cleanup will often make your system a little snappier and you can also free up a large amount of used disk space.

You can find the Disk Cleanup utility in the following locations:

WinXP: Start > Program Files > Accessories > System Tools > Disk Cleanup

Vista/Win7: Start > All Programs > Accessories > System Tools > Disk Cleanup


If you occasionally clean out your unwanted system files using Windows “Disk Cleanup”, you may have seen that the Disk Cleanup utility takes a long time scanning for “Compressed Folders”. I have seen this many times and it makes me impatient every time.

A few weeks ago, a friend of mine at work (Bill M), told me that there’s a registry hack to make Cleanup skip the long wait. He was right, I found it using a simple Google search.

Here’s the registry hack (works in XP, so far – have not seen this work in Vista and Win7):

WinXP: Open up the registry editor by clicking the Start Button, then choose Run, type in “regedit” and press the OK button.

Vista/Win7: Hit the Start button and type regeditin the quick search.

Once you have regedit running, find the following location:
\VolumeCaches\System error memory dump files”

The “Flags” value must be set to “0”.

For 64-bit Windows only:

\VolumeCaches\System error memory dump files”

The “Flags” value must be set to “0”.

You may not   notice any difference until you reboot, but the next time you use Disk Cleanup, you should notice a substantial decrease in the amount of time it takes.

Find as You Type with Listary

Last year, while trying out some Linux operating systems, I was surprised to discover a cool find-as-you-type feature in the Gnome Nautilus file browsers.

listary-icon While looking for a file, you only had to start typing and a small text box appeared in the bottom right of the window (as shown below).


At this point I had feature envybecause I wanted to see the same feature built into Windows Explorer. However, I knew that this was not going to happen anytime soon. Windows is traditionally many years behind on cool features that appear in other operating systems.

Last week, I found that my wait was over. As usual, someone saw the need and developed a third-party app which adds this cool feature to Windows. Listary not only reproduces the find-as-you-type feature, it adds even more little time-saving tricks.

Here’s what Listary looks like in Windows 7 (or Vista):


As you can see, it not only lists the first match as Nautilus does in Linux, it adds a drop-down list with all the possible matches. Another great addition is that it accepts the asterisk and question mark wild-card characters that help you find files quickly.

If you were looking for only JPG files in a folder, you would start by typing *JPG in the window and your matching files would be listed below. To navigate inside the list, you can use the TAB key or the UP and DOWN arrow keys. As each file is highlighted in the Listary search box, the corresponding file in the Explorer window is also automatically shown and highlighted. If a file you wish to open is highlighted in the results box, pressing ENTER will open it.

In addition to working in Windows 7 and Vista, Listary also works in Windows XP, as shown below.


Listary is a free program although there is a paid version (Listary Pro) which offers more search features. You’ll find that it’s offered as an 827kb setup file that must be installed. The installation doesn’t spring any surprises on you and you do have the ability to set several options in it.

The most important option is whether to allow Listary to start when Windows does. Listary only takes about 7mb of memory while running and is always shown as an icon in the system tray. Right clicking on the system tray icon allows you to exit the program or change settings.

Download the free version of Listary

[via DownloadSquad]

Techie Buzz Verdict:

Listary has given me the chance to try a feature I’d wished for in Windows. I like how it works and I was also surprised to find that it offers more than similar features in Linux. I can’t complain about any lack in features, because there is a Pro version and I could pay for the additional features if I need them.

Techie Buzz Rating: 3/5

Portable Sticky Notes for Your Desktop – hott notes

If you need to post quick notes on your desktop, you have quite a few programs to choose from. My personal pick is hott notes. Hott notes has been around for a long time and has continued to improve with each version. This may or may not be the best sticky notes program, but it does have one feature that would make it my choice. Hott notes is now available in a portable version.

Here’s a screenshot from the website:


You can change the colors, fonts, titles, add pictures, to-do lists and more. Here’s a brief list of other features.

• Note types – Message, List, Scribble
• Transparency
• Scribbles draw your own images
• Wastebasket just like Windows Trash Bin
• Archive notes store them away
• Backup notes keep them safe
• Restore notes from Wastebasket or Archive
• Import notes from Backup files

I like the portable version, which I can take with me on a flash drive to use on any Windows PC. It’s offered as a ZIP file and can be extracted to any location.

Here are 11 more sticky note programs. If you need a sticky notes program that can be used on multiple operating systems, such as Mac or Linux, you might like to try GloboNotes, which runs on any computer with Java 6 installed on it. Another popular sticky program is called Stickies, and I’m still waiting for a portable version of it that actually works.

• Download hott notes

Techie Buzz Verdict:

Hott notes is a good way to keep track of small bits of information. Just like the real world sticky notes, they will keep you from forgetting important events or information. The only lack I’ve found so far, is that you can’t paste images into these, even though you can draw your own using the Scribbles note type.

Techie Buzz Rating: 3/5 (Good)

Microsoft Releases Windows Experience Pack for Windows XP/Vista/7

Microsoft has been releasing freebies for Windows 7 users fairly regularly. However, that doesn’t mean that Microsoft has completely forgotten about users of older versions of Windows. The Windows team has released a new set of goodies for Windows Live, which are available not only for Windows 7 but also for Windows XP and Vista.


The Windows Experience Pack allows you to enjoy the beach, explore the city, go on a safari or experience the mountains without leaving your computer. It is mainly targeted towards Windows Live users and includes display pictures (static as well as dynamic), winks, emotions and messenger scenes. Windows 7 users will also get a new set of desktop backgrounds (wallpaper) and screensavers. The desktop wallpaper is personalized and features your online avatar.

The so called Windows Experience Pack is little more than a set of Windows Live goodies. If you don’t use Windows Live you won’t really find this exciting. However, one can’t really complain about something which is free.

WinPatrol Lifetime License for 99¢ – One Day Only

I don’t check my Twitter very often. I was surprised to catch a tweet that I consider breaking news. The author of the excellent WinPatrol security software for Windows has gone a little crazy. Here’s what he says on his blog.

I’m curious and thinking a crazy single day experiment could be fun and may be worth the risk. So what the hell. If you want to upgrade to WinPatrol PLUS on January 29th, I’ll give you a lifetime WinPatrol membership for less than a dollar. (normally $29.95 USD)

I’ve used the free version of WinPatrol many times over the last few years. Last year we wrote an article telling you how to use WinPatrol to speed up Windows startup by delaying less important startup programs. That’s only one way to use WinPatrol. It’s been listed at Gizmo’s as a Best Free Intrusion Prevention and Detection Utility for Home Use. The PLUSedition of WinPatrol has some features in it that are going to be worth far more than a dollar to most users.

I’ll take a few moments here to tell you about some of it’s other important features.


As you can see, the program offers you 13 tabs full of information about the programs, services and settings on your PC. These include:

• Startup Programs
• Delayed Start
• ActiveX
• IE Helpers
• Scheduled Tasks
• Services
• Active Tasks
• Cookies
• File Types
• Hidden Files
• Recent
• PLUS Information
• WinPatrol Options

Each one of those tabs typically allow you to not only see what’s going on in your PC, but to also make changes to those areas. WinPatrol normally runs as an icon in your System Tray and notifies you when important PC settings are changed. Once notified, you are given the chance to deny those changes.

The PLUS section gives you access to WinPatrol’s exclusive information about the normally unknown processes that run on your PC.

There’s also a portable version of WinPatrol called WinPatrolToGo that can be taken with you on a flash drive or other portable media.

The 99 ¢ offer is available only on January 29th at:


Techie Buzz Verdict:

The free version of WinPatrol is a great addition to the security of any Windows PC. Adding the PLUS features for a small lifetime fee of 99 cents is a real bargain that many people should consider. Remember that this offer is only good on January 29th 2010, one day only.

Techie Buzz Rating: 4/5

How To Repair Your Default Image FileTypes

I can’t explain how disappointed I was. I was angry too. I had just tried out a new freebie image viewer and decided I didn’t like it. Most good applications will remove their custom settings when you uninstall them. This time I was foiled because the uninstaller decided that it couldn’t read the install.log file it had created.

broken-image-icon What could I do now? I had let the new application take over all of the image filetypes. I could manually delete the program, but that wouldn’t change all the system registry entries it would leave behind. The Windows registry is what controls the filetype settings and I wasn’t looking forward to making all of those changes manually.

After I mentally kicked myself for not using an installation monitor like Z-Soft, I manually deleted the program from my Program Files folder. Then I opened regedit and used global searches to remove all entries containing the name or the former path of the now dead image viewer. It took me awhile to do this and I was still kicking myself for not being more careful. Warning: Editing the Windows registry to remove entries is risky and can leave your PC in worse shape than it started out.

Naturally after I’d removed all of the registry entries, none of my images were opening up like they used to. I decided to do a Google search for restore default image typesand sure enough, someone had solved this problem. I found the answer I was looking for at a trustworthy site. The site is owned by Ramesh Srinivasan, an old acquaintance of mine, an all around nice guy and a Microsoft MVP. About 5 years ago, I’d written about one of his websites and he was kind enough to link back to me after we exchanged a few emails.

So, what did I find there? I found a tiny little application called imageditor.exe. The app’s name doesn’t really give you a clue about what it does. Take a look at the interface and you’ll get a good idea how to use it.

Note: This utility is intended for Windows XP systems only. Ramesh said that he is working on similar fixes for Vista, which may also work in Windows 7. (Update: Here are default file type fixes for Win7 and Vista)


Okay, it isn’t super simple to figure out by just looking at it. I’ll explain it to you now.

The top pull-down menu allows you to choose individual image filetypes such as – BMP, DIB, EMF, GIF, JFIF, JPG, JPE, JPEG, PNG, TIF, TIFF and WMF. It lets you restore each filetype individually, as needed, when you click the button beside it.

You may not like the image viewer that Windows assigns by default. The center text field let’s you force Windows to use the viewer you want. Just choose a filetype from the pull-down at the top. Hit the Browsebutton and then select an image viewer that you’d like to assign as the default image viewer for the image type you have selected.

Finally, the bottom section let’s you re-assign all of Windows image types to the Windows default viewers in one quick action. Add checkmarks to the boxes you’d like to change, then hit the Repair associationsbutton.

I used this last option after checking every one of the 12 image types. It worked perfectly.

• Thank you Ramesh you are awesome. I hope to talk to you again some day.

• To the people behind CoffeeCup Free Image Viewer thank you for your defective uninstaller. It led me to find this cool tool.

• For the rest of you out there – don’t do what I did. It’s not smart to install new applications without running an install monitor or at least setting a Windows Restore point. Good luck, and I hope you never have to edit the registry. It isn’t fun and it’s not always safe.

Download Imageditor v1.1 from windowsxp.mvps.org


Techie Buzz Verdict:

If you’re image filetypes get all mixed up, imageditor may be exactly what you need. It’s free, it’s small and it’s easy.


Techie Buzz Rating: 4/5 (Excellent)

Chinese Pirates Hacked Ubuntu to Look Like Windows XP

Infamous Chinese software pirates were not much happy with just copying Windows XP, so they moved their interests to hacking Ubuntu to look like Windows XP. With a Windows XP look-alike we do not mean just a theme or a shell replacement, going by what we experienced, Ylmf OS is a pixel-perfect copycat of Windows XP, but based on Ubuntu Linux.

Ylmf OS
Ylmf OS

Ylmf OS is the closest Windows XP look, that Linux can ever get to. The link that we have provided, to the homepage of Ylmf OS, is converted from Chinese to English. This OS is based on Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala. Most of the Chinese fonts are integrated into Ylmf, so an English language user cannot expect to use it right away.

If you want to download and install Ylmf OS, you can download it from here.

Some of the Screenshots

(Yes even we were surprised !) :

Ylmf OS
Ylmf OS
Ylmf OS
Ylmf OS
Ylmf OS
Ylmf OS
Ylmf OS
Ylmf OS

Techie-Buzz Verdict:

As we have already stated, Ylmf OS is the closest look Linux can get, of Windows XP.   Ylmf OS also integrates the latest and stable OpenOffice 3.1, for complete portability with MS Office. It also integrates classic Windows theme, so that users can feel more close to Windows user interface. It also integrates stable version on Wine emulator. It has SMplayer for media playback. For internet browsing, it has latest version of Firefox. aMule, Filezilla and Pidgin are also integrated. If we put all of these features together, it is a complete and stable Linux distro that is perfect for use, even for a Windows user. We looked at Ylmf OS from two viewpoints: 1. As a Linux distro: Perfect, as it is based on stable architecture of Ubuntu Linux, plus it provides users with Windows XP look and feel. 2. As pirated/ripped Windows XP: As far as we know, Microsoft cannot sue the developers of Ylmf OS, as it is completely based on Ubuntu Linux, which itself promotes modifications and copying. But, if the developers have ported/hacked some code from Windows XP, to bring such a close look to Linux, they are in trouble. Earlier as reported in Clonedinchina, a developer had landed in jail for 3.5 years for Tomato Garden Windows XP, a pirated version of Windows XP. We at Techie-Buzz, never promote Piracy.

Techie-Buzz Rating:4/5

Find Files Fast with UltraSearch

UltraSearch_MAINICON Last week, I told you how to Replace Windows XP Search with a faster file search utility. In the article I mentioned three very good and fast replacements.

This week, I’ve found a fourth search utility that I can recommend as well.

A company, named Jam Software, has just released a beta version of UltraSearch. It’s a relatively small and very fast file search utility for NTFS local drives. It should run well in any Windows OS that uses NTFS file systems (WinNT, Win2K, WinXP, Vista, Win7).

Features I like:

  • It’s very fast, almost as fast as indexed search tools
  • It’s small, less than 2mb download
  • It’s simple, no options other than selecting drives
  • It accepts wildcard characters ( * ? )
  • It allows the Windows context menus to show (right click on file)
  • It’s available as a zip download and installed download
  • It includes a help file (English and German)
  • It can be used from a portable drive (flash drive, floppy disk, CD)
  • It’s freeware, no strings attached



First, I want to clarify why I like search tools that don’t create indexes. Usually, an indexed search tool must run in the background, continuously watching your hard drive for changes. Often the index databases can be large, sometimes very large (gigabytes). Indexed search tools, can not be used from a portable drive, at least not easily.

Techie Buzz Verdict:

UltraSearch isn’t a new idea. There are a few other tools that take advantage of the NTFS file tables to search quickly. It also does not search inside of files for text or other data. It cannot be considered completely portable since it appears to write data to the Application Data folders and likely other areas. However, if all you need is a very fast and easy file search, it’s a big winner.

Techie Buzz Rating: 3.5/5 (Very good)