Tag Archives: Windows Phone

iPhone 4S Used by a Windows Phone User: Screen

iPhone 4S

For an introduction and background to this series, please refer to my first post on the topic: New Series: iPhone 4S Used by a Windows Phone User.

After looking at the setup experience, the first thing I wanted to look at is the much talked about Retina display of the iPhone 4S. I had heard a lot about how fantastic it is, and read a lot about the technical stuff like pixel density on that screen, but hadn’t experienced it outside of using my friends’ phones for a few minutes. The few minutes I spent with my friends’ phones did not impress me much but I attributed it to the fact that I had spent so little time with the display.

So, having used it constantly for a few days, what was the verdict? Frankly, I don’t see what the big deal is. Yes, it is clear and crisp. It is very, very clear and crisp. However, the Super AMOLED screen of my Focus and the ClearBlack AMOLED on my Lumia are both equally clear and crisp. In fact, I love the deeper colors on the base Lumia screen much more than what the iPhone 4S produces. It could be a result of bigger tiles on my Lumia compared to the many folders (with tinier icons) on my iPhone, but in “real world” use, the Lumia comes off as being as clear and crisp as the iPhone and the colors richer/deeper than the iPhone.

 

IMG_0048Screen Capture (11)

 

Yes, I could zoom into a specific icon and see how there is virtually no pixelation, but I never zoom to that level with my normal eyesight. Under normal circumstances, I look at the Lumia screen (with the dark theme enabled), and I look at the iPhone 4S with the normal brightness, and I must say, the Lumia screen comes out looking better.

(Please excuse my screenshots – I tried to make sure the brightness levels on both the phones were similar, and also, it looks like screenshot tools on *both* the phones seem to be just average?)

The other area where the Retina display is supposed to do better is reading. The claim — web pages, books, etc. are much better to read on that display compared to the Lumia? Here too, I did not see a tremendous difference.

IMG_0049Screen Capture (12)

 

IMG_0053Screen Capture (15)

IMG_0051Screen Capture (14)

IMG_0050Screen Capture (13)

Perhaps my expectations were raised really high? Maybe. Perhaps I should have tested it with long periods of reading? Maybe, but I don’t read pages and pages of books on the phone. The most I read is a multi-page web article, some part of books/magazines, and of course emails. I have provided some samples of the same above, and the Retina does not come off as being vastly different from the Lumia.

I would like to state emphatically, the iPhone screen is fantastic. However, in comparison to the Lumia, it does not seem to be dramatically superior. The Lumia holds its own despite “lower specs” across the board. The ClearBlack AMOLED on the Lumia “pops” the colors very well and the text renders quite well too. Oh, and a completely personal takeaway: when I turn on the Lumia, there is an immediate “wow” factor; maybe because of the colors, the brightness, the curved glass screen, or a combination of these and other factors that I can’t really pinpoint. Whatever it is, it makes the Lumia screen feel better than the iPhone screen, to me. Some friends on Twitter said that I need to give the Retina display some time and I will realize the beauty of it. I have seen it is a good screen, but after 4-5 days of extensive use, I really don’t see a huge upside in that screen.

Also, since I promised to talk about size as well, let me say that strictly speaking, the Lumia 800 that I am using now and the iPhone are not too different in size. However, my previous phone, the Samsung Focus, was 4″ diagonally and I really, really like that size. When I started using the Lumia after the Focus, I felt that the Lumia itself was a bit small (it is 3.7″ diagonally) and the iPhone is even smaller. So, compared to my ideal screen size of 4″, the iPhone seems smaller. However, for this experiment, I will not bring it up since the Lumia 800 and the iPhone are comparable in size.

Do you have any feedback on this comparison? Have you seen something I did not? I would love to hear from you!

LG Fantasy: The LG Windows Phone That Never Will Be

Earlier this week, we covered LG’s announcement that they will no longer be making Windows Phones. This should come as no surprise; not only is Windows Phone still an underdog platform, but on top of this, LG makes terrible phones. The people who do explore the platform — and also the salespeople that enlighten the more non-technical bunch about it — deviate more towards Nokia, HTC, and Samsung devices. That being said, before reaching this decision, it appears that LG was toying with the idea of producing a newer Windows Phone device.

WPCentral has gotten its hands on the aptly named LG Fantasy, a prototype Windows Phone device. The prototype, concocted by the company back in 2011 seems to have been a mid-range (or upper low-end) offering from the company; although it does have 512MB of RAM, it lacked in other areas.

It was made of plastic and felt cheap, and also extremely light due to the materials used to produce the device. However, harshness aside, it is a prototype, so it can’t necessarily be judged on the hardware front. One noteworthy tidbit about the device is that it does have fully-functional NFC hardware.

But, all in all, it’s a pretty lackluster and boring device. I can’t say that I’m going to lose any sleep over LG’s decision.

LG Dumps Windows Phone, Chooses to Focus on Android

LGWe already know that in spite of pretty favorable reviews, Windows Phone devices haven’t been selling all that well. Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak recently showered Windows Phone with praises for its beautifully designed and engaging interface. Unfortunately, most consumers are yet to share his enthusiasm. Windows Phone currently has less than a tenth of Android’s market share, and the jury is still out on the success of its poster boy – the Lumia 900. Last year was a pretty tough one for most mobile handset manufacturers. Barring Apple and Samsung, pretty much everyone else had reasons to worry. Nokia was probably the one hardest hit. The once market leader is now in a battle for survival having put all its chips on Microsoft’s mobile operating system (OS). However, another struggling manufacturer has decided to cut its losses and move away from the platform.

LG has announced that going forward it will be focusing its efforts on Android handsets, which were largely responsible for the Korean giant turning in a profit after spending seven straight quarters in the red. LG believes that “the total unit of Windows Phone sold in the global market is not a meaningful figure”. As a result, it will not be releasing any new Windows Phone devices in the near future. It will, however, continue research and development efforts on Microsoft’s OS.

To be honest, LG’s Windows Phone offerings have been pretty mundane, and it’s not surprising that they failed to gain any real traction. This decision also makes sense for LG financially, as it will allow them to innovate more in Android handsets, which are its best bet for regaining market share. However, LG’s departure is also sad, as it will only make things tougher for a platform that truly deserves to succeed.

iPhone 4S Used by a Windows Phone User: Out Of the Box Experience, Setup

iPhone

For an introduction and background to this series, please refer to my first post on the topic: New Series: iPhone 4S Used by a Windows Phone User.

As someone who has switched (and reset) Windows Phones quite a bit, for one reason or the other, I know how painful it is to get the phone to “my state”. Yes, entering my Windows Live ID and setting up Facebook account sets up a ton of stuff automatically (Contacts, Calendars, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pictures) but there are still a lot of personalization items which I have to repeat every single time. Here is what I have to do every time I set up a new Windows Phone, after setting up my “accounts”:

  • Reinstall all my apps. It is a bit easier now with web marketplace and apps like Reinstaller, but I still have to manually reinstall each app.
  • Customize each app with login information, settings for the app, etc.
  • Set up my live tiles for various apps. Some apps offer secondary tiles (like “Sports News” in a newspaper app, for example), so these have to be manually set up.
  • De-dupe contacts across Windows Live, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn. This seems like a bit of functionality which was left off for lack of time. On Windows Live website, these contacts are in fact de-duped, but on the phone, they are not. So I have to go in and clean up manually.
  • Create my People Groups and pin them to Start Screen. I like this feature a lot, so I do like to create three groups: immediate family, cousins, and close friends. That way, I see the updates from these groups bubble up over all the other noise. There’s no way to save these Groups in the cloud so they automatically come when I sign in.
  • Adjust system settings like letting Bing use location services, my Office username, etc.
  • I don’t play many games, but if I did, almost none of the games save their states in the cloud, so all game progress gets lost when moving phones.
  • Connect to PC to set up wireless sync (and check if there are any updates available for the phone).

As you can see, there is a lot of work to be done after signing into various accounts to set up a new phone. How does it go with iPhone? Read on!

New Series: iPhone 4S Used by a Windows Phone User

iPhone

Those who read my posts know that I have been a Windows Phone user since it launched in late-2010. I like the platform a lot, and do believe it is more efficient for the way I use a smartphone. Before I switched to Windows Phone, I used an iPhone 3GS. Since then, my exposure to iOS has been through my iPad (1 and 2) and my iPod Touch. However, those iOS devices are at most used for an hour a day, so it is not fair to use that to compare against the Windows Phone platform.

So, when I recently got an opportunity to get an AT&T iPhone 4S, I jumped on it. I decided to give it my full attention, use it as my primary(-ish) phone for some time, and compare and contrast iOS with Windows Phone after actually using it. I figured, rather than compare specs on paper, which anybody can, it would be better to compare usage. With that in mind, I present this new series, where I will talk about various aspects of using Nokia Lumia 800 Windows Phone vs. using an iPhone 4S. My intention is to look at the common tasks one performs with a smartphone and how they differ across these two platforms. This is not so much of a “competition” to determine who “wins”, it is more of a comparison to identify the tasks where one platform may excel and the other may not.

I plan to break the series into the following:

What I do not want to do is:

  • Look at hard specs like cores, PPI, version of bluetooth supported, etc. If any of these happen to make it more difficult for me to do normal things, I will point them out.
  • I am going in with the assumption that we are going to live in a heterogeneous world where I may have a Windows PC and related apps along with my iPhone or iPad. As a result, I will try to stay away from stuff that is clearly going to remain “Apple-only”. For example, iMessage or certain aspects of iCloud which do not carry over to say, a Windows Phone, like contacts and calendar sync. There are other platform-specific tie-ins with Windows Phone like Xbox LIVE Achievements, which again, I won’t go into.

I am genuinely excited, both, to try the iPhone 4S (it’s been about 2 years since I used an iPhone), as well as to compare that experience to how I do things on my Lumia. Is there anything specific you would like me to look at in this experiment? Let me know!

White Nokia Lumia 900s Hit The Shelves

Today, the white Nokia Lumia 900 flagship Windows Phone has officially gone on sale at AT&T stores.

Some stores did sell the device a day early, according to reports. AT&T stores were allegedly allowed to begin selling the phone a bit earlier than expected at their own discretion, and clearly some stores did just that. If you didn’t go to one of the early bird AT&T stores, however, then now is your chance.

When it comes to phones, people seem to be mesmerized by white. This was most clearly demonstrated in the case of the iPhone 4, when many held out waiting for the white version of the device which didn’t ship for quite some time. Some have other reasons behind their choices to purchase white phones, such as Rafael Rivera, who bought his so that he could use the green bumper.

The Nokia Lumia 900 is pretty much the flagship Windows Phone devices. It’s being heavily promoted by AT&T as a flagship device, as they greatly covet a third ecosystem. Even Verizon expressed a desire for a third ecosystem, claiming that they wish to throw as much support behind Windows Phone as they did for Android.

Skype for Windows Phone 1.0 Released, No Longer In Beta

Following a particularly long wait — leading up to a private beta in February of this year, during which the product version was 0.2 — Microsoft has finally released Skype for Windows Phone 1.0 to the Marketplace.

The new release packs some optimizations and improvements, according to WPCentral, including the ability to search for and add contacts and call landlines. However, the unfortunate limitation that prevents you from leaving a call running in the background while “out” of the app, performing other tasks on your phone persists.

We can only hope that this issue will be rectified come Windows Phone 8, perhaps with deeper OS integration of Skype to boot. Microsoft explained the limitation to The Verge, saying that it is due to “a combination of how Skype works and how the Windows Phone OS works.” This is quite unfortunate, really, as those on iOS and Android will be able to enjoy Skype calls running in the background on their devices. Considering Microsoft acquired the company, it isn’t exactly thrilling to see such an important feature working on every platform but their own.

Nevertheless, it’s still good to hear that Skype for Windows Phone has now been released. Let’s just hope that they aspire to resolve this issue with — or maybe even before — Apollo.

Is Verizon Feeling A Bit More Enthusiastic About Windows Phone?

Out of all the U.S mobile carriers, Verizon is probably the one to demonstrate the least amount of enthusiasm for the Windows Phone platform. While AT&T and T-Mobile have began to embrace the platform — particularly with the addition and heavy promotion of Nokia devices, especially from the former carrier — the old, pre-Mango HTC Trophy is the only Windows Phone available on Verizon.

However, it appears that the company may be interested in changing this attitude towards the platform. During its Q1 2012 earnings call on Thursday, the company stated that it is looking to do the “same thing” that it does with Android with Windows Phone, going on to stress the importance of a third ecosystem:

“It is important that there is a third ecosystem brought into the mix here,” said Verizon CFO Fran Shammo. “We are fully supportive of that with Microsoft. … We helped create the Android platform from the beginning and it is an incredible platform today, and we are looking to do the same thing with a third ecosystem.”

Considering the fact that the company still sells only one — first-generation at that — Windows Phone device, surely they intend to add newer Windows Phones to their portfolio. But which device(s)? Surely they will go the route of a Nokia Lumia. But when? I wonder if they’re going to wait until Apollo before beginning to heavily back the Windows Phone platform.

Still, it’s nice to see that the company is at least slightly interested in Windows Phone. I just hope that their actions soon begin to back the bold statement issued at the earnings call.

Will Apollo Allow For Additional OEM and Carrier Customization?

Thus far, Microsoft hasn’t really opened up Windows Phone for OEM customization. Apart from some apps which may come pre-installed with a device from a carrier — which can be easily uninstalled should you not want them — Windows Phone is pretty much stock. This may change, however, as the company may be opening up the platform for additional “customization and differentiation”.

Netbook News obtained the agenda of an Apollo summit that the company is hosting in Reading, UK, and one of the primary topics that will be discussed is “customization and differentiation opportunities”. While the report doesn’t reveal anything beyond the topic titles themselves, this topic in particular is highly suggestive of more carrier/OEM customization to come.

Tom Warren thinks that the integration will be seamless and executed well enough to not be interpreted as bloatware by the user. One implementation he notes is the integration of Rich Communication Suite-enhanced services within Windows Phone 8. He reported that Microsoft will allow operators to integrate their own (or third party) voice and messaging solutions seamlessly into the OS within the People hub. VOIP may even be integrated, with VOIP calls looking like normal voice calls when received over Windows Phone 8.

I wouldn’t mind seamless integration of that nature. However, if this allows for even more bloatware, or perhaps customization that makes Windows Phone look like an OS developed by AT&T, that would be terrible. Here’s the complete list of topics that Microsoft will reportedly be touching on during the summit:

  • Apollo Review
  • Windows Phone Schedules and release plans/processes
  • Customization & Differentiation opportunities
  • New Windows Phone 8 application development capabilities
  • What’s new feature review of Apollo
  • Connectivity and APN management
  • Better together with Windows 8

Nokia has a Dismal Quarter; Sales Disappoint

Nokia announced its earnings for the first quarter of 2012, and as expected, they suck. Its net sales dropped 29% year-over-year to €7.35 billion, while its operating profit dipped from €439 million to an operating loss of €1.34 billion.

It has seen a decline in not only smartphone sales, but also mobile phone sales. It is expecting to make an operating loss again in the next quarter, as it scrambles to get its device strategy in place.

While most of the loss can be attributed to restructuring, it would have reported a loss even on an adjusted, non-IFRS basis.

While the sales of Lumia devices have apparently been encouraging, they hardly offset the decline in sales of Nokia’s Symbian devices.

“We are navigating through a significant company transition in an industry environment that continues to evolve and shift quickly. Over the last year we have made progress on our new strategy, but we have faced greater than expected competitive challenges.” said Elop, Nokia’s CEO. “We are confident in our strategy and focused on responding urgently in the short term and creating value for our shareholders in the long term.”

At this point, Nokia’s future is almost entirely tied to Microsoft’s Windows Phone. 2012 is going to be a very crucial year for both of them, and should tell us whether or not Nokia made the right move by betting everything on Microsoft’s horse which may be capable of smoking the other horses, but entered the race too late.

Nokia plans to focus on the budget smartphone segment with cheaper smartphone options like the Lumia 610, and also focus on international markets to drive growth.