How To Open or Play MKV Files?

MKV files are video files which are similar to AVI and MOV formats and supports several different types of audio and video codecs. The MKV file format is an acronym for Matroska Video File.

If you have recently downloaded a MKV file, you might not be able to open it with Windows Media Player. However, there are several other free video players which will allow you to watch movies that have an MKV extension.

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In order to watch videos with the .MKV file extension, you should download the VLC player or DivX Player. You can download the above players from the following links:

Once you have downloaded and installed the software, you can then just double click on the MKV file and open it or use the “File -> Open” dialog provided by these players to browse and open your MKV file.

Hope this answers your question. Enjoy your video.

Firefox Nightly Build Gets WebM Support

Earlier last month, Google, Mozilla and announced a new competitor to the H.264 codec for , WebM. Opera had already released new builds with WebM support, and today Mozilla will be officially adding WebM support to their nightly builds.

The announcement was made by Chris Pearce a Mozilla developer working on Firefox. WebM is a welcome addition to the HTML5 family since there are only 2 codecs available right now one of which is open source and other one being proprietary.

WebM on the other hand is open source and superior than the Ogg Theora codec currently in use. WebM in itself has not been out of controversies and has also come under attack from Steve Jobs who himself support the proprietary H.264 codec.

If you haven’t yet heard about WebM or want to learn about it, read our earlier post: WebM: Why We Should Be Excited.

Excited about trying out WebM on Firefox? Head over and download the latest copy from the Firefox Nightly Build repository here. Once you have downloaded and installed the latest nightly you can experience WebM support by visiting a HTML5 experiment here.

For more information about the nightly build and instructions on doing your own build with WebM support visit Chris’s blog post here.