Tag Archives: Twitter Spam

Beware of “Twitter Video Facebook App” and Fake DMs

A new Facebook scam app has been doing the rounds lately on the social networking site Facebook and Twitter, by asking users to login to a fake Twitter page in order to watch a video that could leave them surprised. The app sends out Direct Messages to all the followers of that Twitter account containing a bogus message and a link to the Facebook app page.

The Direct Message sent to includes the message “lol ur famous now” along with the link to the Facebook app page.  Alternate messages sent include, “oh dear, what have you been up to,” “what are you doing in this fb vid?,” “wow ur busted in this video,” and so on.

Here is a list of all the DMs that users have received:

  • hey this person is making up offensive things that are about youTwitter DM Spam
  • what are you doing in this viddeoo ROFL
  • hey this user is making up shocking things that are about you
  • what are you doing with him n this video
  • wat r u doing with him in this vidd  ROFL
  • you didnt tell me you had a video
  • the link i sent before was messed up!
  • wow your busted in this video!
  • whatt are you doing in this fb vid ?
  • precisely what could you be doing on this video clip omg weird
  • hey this user is making up dreadful posts that are about you
  • lol ur famous now
  • hey someone is writing cruel things that are about you

Clicking the link would bring end-users to the following app page with the title “Twitter Video: You must be logged into Twitter to use this app.”

Twitter Video Facebook App

Please be aware that this is a fake Twitter page that is designed to look exactly like a genuine Twitter login page. If you provide your login details here and click on Sign In, you will either end up on an error page, or you will be shown a fake YouTube video player with a list of online survey questions. The page will prompt you to answer the online survey questions first before you can watch the video. However, even after you take up the online survey, there will be no video shown; instead you will be redirected to another bogus page.

Additionally, your login details are sent to the owner of the Facebook app page, who in turn uses it to login to your Twitter account and send Direct Messages to all your followers. If you have accidentally entered your login details, it is recommended that you immediately change your account password, and unlink apps that you might have not given the permission to be associated with your Twitter account.

Alternatively, if you think you’ve found a spam profile, you can follow these steps to report it to Twitter:

  • Visit the spam account’s profile.
  • Click the person icon. This brings up a drop-down Actions menu (see image below).
  • Click on Report @username for spam.

There are a number of scam messages spreading on Twitter and Facebook, and it advised to be careful before clicking any links. Some of the phishing attacks on Twitter have spread through DM messages like “You Seen What This Person is Saying About You Terrible Things” and “Somebody is Saying Real Bad Rumors About You“.

h/t @nileshgr 

Wow! Your Photo is Cool Twitter Spam

There’s seems to be a spam message spreading on Twitter, where users are posting and re-tweeting about a photo with a shortened URL to a website. The message spreading is “WOW! your photo is cool” along with a link.

Spammers have created a Twitter bot that has been randomly sending the spam message to Twitter users by mentioning them in the tweet. When you search on Twitter for the message, you will see a number RTs and @ replies the message has received. The results are displayed in real-time and you can also notice the number of tweets flowing in related to the message.

Your Photo is Cool - Twitter Spam

Upon clicking the link, you will be redirected to a bogus page where you will be asked to download an application program. Please DO NOT download this whatsoever as this is a malware program that is designed to steal user information.

Generally, malware programs collect information such as email id, passwords, contact numbers in the background and sends them to the automatically to scammer without your knowledge. It is recommended that you avoid clicking on any suspicious links on Twitter or Facebook.

Sometimes you will be redirected to your Twitter profile and ask permission to install an app. Such apps will then send out rogue messages as a direct message to all your followers and continue spreading the malware message across the social networking site.

You will also get a warning message from your browser indicating that the site you are visiting could be potentially harmful to your computer as such:

Chrome Warning

There are a number of scam messages spreading on Twitter and Facebook, and it advised to be careful before clicking any links. Some of the phishing attacks on Twitter have spread through DM messages like “You Seen What This Person is Saying About You Terrible Things” and “Somebody is Saying Real Bad Rumors About You“.

Funny, but Samsung Did Not Pay Apple $1bn in 5 Cent Coins

Over the past few days, the Internet has sparked with Apple-Samsung verdict as the federal jury slapped Samsung with a $1 billion penalty for violating Apple’s patent rights. In the wake of this, there have been rumors spreading in the past couple of days that Samsung cleared the $1 billion penalty by paying it in 5 cent coins.

The rumor on Samsung paying Apple in nickels spread like wildfire. It is reported to be spreading from the website MobileEntertainment, however, it is known that it originated from a Mexico-based parody website El Deforma, which was then carried over by 9gag users and made it as a cartoon.

Samsung Galaxy

The actual message that was spreading across Twitter and Facebook was this:

“Yesterday, more than 30 trucks filled with five cent coins arrived at Apple’s headquarters in California. Apple security were in the process of freaking out before Apple CEO Tim Cook was called by Samsung explaining that they will pay all of the $1.05 billion they owe Apple in coins, and this was the first instalment”.

Funny, but sadly this is not true and Samsung did not pay Apple by sending trucks filled with nickels. When I first read about it and tweeted stating that it is a hoax, I never thought the same rumor would spread this far.

Twitter user Ken Tindell tweeted, “a nickel weighs 5g. It would take 2,755 18-wheeler trucks (max legal tare 80,000 lbs) to carry the money.” Just for fun, here’s how much a billion dollars in nickels would weigh: At 5g each that’s 0.005 kg x 20,000,000,000 = 100,000,000 kg = 100,000 tonnes.

As a matter of fact, Samsung hasn’t been ordered to pay the $1 billion to Apple yet. It’s just a jury’s verdict. According to  The Guardian, “Samsung’s fine ($1.049bn) isn’t yet payable; the judge hasn’t ruled. All we have is the jury’s verdict. The judge’s decision, which could include a tripling of the fine, is due on 20 September (or possibly 6 December now; it’s unclear). Until then, Samsung only has to pay its lawyers. That should be less than $1bn”.

The funny part was Yahoo considered this as story and featured it on one of its pages!

[via]

Robert Pattinson Dies in Car Accident Facebook Hoax

Rumors about the death of the Twilight star Robert Pattinson have been circulating on Twitter and Facebook over the last few days. With the recent shocking news about Robert’s long-time girlfriend Kristen Stewart had cheated on him, rumor states that Pattinson died due to emotional stress, and was found lying in a pool of blood in his bathtub.

The rumor noticed on Facebook is as follows:

Robert Pattinson of TWILIGHT Died becuase nervous breakdown due of emotional stress. They found him lying on his bath tub along with blood. Police are now investigating. Watch the video on how the neighbors save ROBERT PATTINSON (18yrs & above) ->> [LINK]

The link provided in the message takes you to a Facebook application page, where you are asked to grant permission for the app to access your personal information and also post updates on your behalf. Clicking the “Allow” button will provide the scammer to post Wall updates on your Facebook profile, and spam your friends’ news feed. It is recommended that you avoid clicking on the link.

A similar rumor is spreading about the death of Robert Pattinson, but this one provides a different cause of death. It states that Pattinson died in a single car accident on route 80 between Morrisville and Roswell.

 “Very sad news, especially for all the Twilight fans, Robert Pattinson died in a single car accident on route 80 between Morrisville and Roswell. He died on July 29, 2012, at the age of 26…. Friends and family are mourning the loss of a loved one.”

Death hoax about celebrities are nothing new, and Pattinson is not the first actor to fall victim to such a hoax. In the recent past, there have been several such death hoax messages spreading on Facebook and Twitter, which included Arnold SchwarzeneggerKeanu Reeves and Mickey Rourke.

You can read about our earlier articles on how to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Also don’t forget to bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams and subscribe to our Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

CNBC.Com Spoof Twitter Spam on The Rise

Of late, Twitter users are being  bombarded with tons of direct messages which contain links to a spoof CNBC website that shows you how to make tons of money while sitting at home. While these types of spam messages are not new and have been circulated in the past (See: Want to Start a Real Internet Biz This Year?), the number of DMs these days are hitting the roof.

CNBC.com Twitter DM Spam

The spam is being circulating in various forms and includes messages (accompanied with a spoof CNBC.com link) like:

Hey, Be your own boss man!

Hey, Why be bitched around, turn the tables on em!

Hey, Change your life, TODAY!

Hey, Why bother doing somebody elses dirty work?

Hey, This is how you make REAL money!

Though these spam messages are not as bad as the bad rumors about you and terrible things about you phishing attacks, they are annoying as hell. The links are created by some work-from-home scammers who want to rip you off and make money themselves.

The link in the message usually takes you to a website which looks very similar to CNBC.com and contain fictitious headlines like “New York Mom Earns $6,795/Month Part-Time”. The website also goes on to detail their online business in the rest of the content and how they are making tons of money accompanied with some fake screenshots of Google AdSense and other money-making websites.

While it is easy to fall prey to because the the website is designed to look like CNBC (and many times other popular news outlets), as a user, you should always look at the URL to see what the domain is.  For example, CNBC.com should always end in CNBC.com followed by any additional parameters and not CNBC.com-scammerdomain.info as in this case.

It is apparent that the users themselves are not sending these messages. So, it might be that users’ accounts are being compromised using other phishing attacks or Twitter apps. As a precaution, change your Twitter password immediately if such messages were sent from your account and also revoke app permissions on Twitter.

Work from Home scams have been going around for years now, but the barrage of spam hitting both Twitter and Facebook is very high. It is high time that both these social networking websites up their ante and start protecting their users from spammers and scammers.

 

Hey This User is Posting Very Bad Rumors About You – Twitter Phishing

Of Late,  has been a target of lot of spam messages, but the most recent ones are pretty dangerous phishing attacks and can allow a spammer to access your Twitter username and password. Most recently Twitter phishing attacks have spread through DM messages like “You Seen What This Person is Saying About You Terrible Things” and “Somebody is Saying Real Bad Rumors About You“.

The new phishing attack is spreading on Twitter through messages like:

Hey this user is posting very bad rumors about you…

Hi someone is posting horrible rumors about you…

The messages above are accompanied with a link which takes you to a phishing website that looks very similar to Twitter. The websites’ URL is also made to look very similar to that of Twitter.

twitter_phishing_dm_attack

Once you are on the website, you will be asked to sign in to your Twitter account because your session has timed out. If you enter your username and password into the phishing page, the scammers will redirect you to Twitter and ask permission to install an app which will then send out the rogue message as a direct message to all your followers and continue spreading the phishing attack.

Please DO NOT enter you username and password since the scammers will then gain access to your account username and password. If you already have done so, make sure to change your Twitter password IMMEDIATELY. Also follow our guide to remove apps from Twitter to revoke permissions to the rogue app that you granted access to.

Please do share this page with your Twitter friends so that they are aware of this phishing attack.

Want to Start a Real Internet Biz This Year? Twitter Spam

We deal with a lot of spam on a day to basis; in email and social networking sites as well. In social networking sites, has usually been the leader in scams but has not been far behind as well.

start_internet_biz_twitter_scam

For the past couple of months quite a few scams have been spreading on Twitter including ones where people were sent DMs with messages like Somebody is Saying Real Bad Rumors About You and You Seen What This Person is Saying About You Terrible Things. While both of those were actually phishing attacks, a new spam message is currently spreading on Twitter with the message:

want to start a real internet biz this year? you must check this out [link redacted]

The link in question leads users to a fake website which talks about making money. Such kind of websites are dime a dozen and we have reported about them in the past. For example, the Work from home scam.

Ironically the website in question opens their fake or what they call "loosely based on truth" article with the question "Are Work at Home Programs a Scam?".  They even have a disclaimer at the bottom (do read it) which says:

I UNDERSTAND THIS WEBSITE IS ONLY ILLUSTRATIVE OF WHAT MIGHT BE ACHIEVABLE FROM USING THIS/THESE PRODUCTS, AND THAT THE STORY DEPICTED ABOVE IS NOT TO BE TAKEN LITERALLY.

It is not really clear as to how these messages are being spread on Twitter right now because the website in question does not have an option or link to share it on Twitter. If the message was shared without your knowledge please make sure to change your Twitter password immediately.

As far as making quick money online, I would suggest that you avoid all such claims that tell you about making thousands of dollars on the Internet. Most of them are usually scams will just make you part with some of your own.

Somebody is Saying Real Bad Rumors About You Twitter Phishing Attack

Last month users were attacked using a DM scam where users received direct messages from people they know saying "You Seen What This Person is Saying About You Terrible Things". The affected several users who went on to click on the accompanying link and then entered their Twitter username and password on the phishing website.

It looks like another similar scam is currently spreading on Twitter through direct messages. The phishing scam is similar to the earlier attacks and is spreading with the following message:

Hi. somebody is saying real bad rumors about you here ;(

The message is accompanied by a link, clicking on which will lead you to a website which spoofs the twitter interface and tells you to login using your Twitter username and password. The URL is also made to look very similar to that of Twitter.

twitter_phishing_dm_attack

The webpage in question asks you to enter your username and password and then redirects you to install an app on Twitter which in turn sends out rogue messages to all your followers.

Please DO NOT enter you username and password since the scammers will then gain access to your account username and password. If you do enter your username and password into the phishing page, the scammers will then redirect you to Twitter and ask permission to install an app which will then send out the rogue message as a direct message to all your followers and continue spreading the phishing attack.

To avoid phishing attacks, always look at the URL to see whether you are entering your password on the site itself and not some masked URL which is made to look like the original site. Additionally, you should also periodically check the apps you have given access to in your Twitter account and remove unwanted apps. Learn how to remove apps or revoke app permissions in Twitter.

You Seen What This Person is Saying About You Terrible Things Twitter Phishing Attack

We have been seeing a lot of Facebook Scams these days, however, it looks like is also being attacked by users with a lot of scam messages. Unlike most of the Twitter scam messages spread through direct messages and are usually phishing attacks.

Twitter DM Phising Message

A new direct message scam is spreading on Twitter right now with a direct message:

You seen what this person is saying about you? [link] terrible things..

The above message comes from someone you might know and follow on Twitter and looks pretty real. If  you click on the URL accompanied in the message, you will be taken to a webpage which is designed to look like Twitter and asked you enter your username and password.

twitter_dm_phishing_attack

Please DO NOT enter you username and password since the scammers will then gain access to your account username and password. If you do enter your username and password into the phishing page, the scammers will then redirect you to Twitter and ask permission to install an app which will then send out the rogue message as a direct message to all your followers and continue spreading the phishing attack.

Most modern browsers like and will detect the URL as a phishing website so you might be better off upgrading to a secure browser.

To avoid phishing attacks, always look at the URL to see whether you are entering your password on the site itself and not some masked URL which is made to look like the original site. Additionally, you should also periodically check the apps you have given access to in your Twitter account and remove unwanted apps. Learn how to remove apps or revoke app permissions in Twitter.

WARNING: TwitVerify Scam Spreading on Twitter

Just like Facebook Scams, there are also a large number of attempts to scam users too. Recently a new scam is making the rounds of Twitter where users are sent messages about a Twitter app called TwitVerify + Profile Spy.

Twitter

There is widespread messages on Twitter asking users to not click on links such as “click verify”. There are several variants of this rogue and many people are reporting it as TwitVerify, TwitVerification and Profile Spy.

We advise you not to click on the links and remove the app from your profile if you have already done so and change your password immediately.

If you aren’t sure how to remove apps from Twitter, follow our earlier guide on How to Revoke Permissions for Twitter Apps. Please feel free to pass along this message to your friends.