Digiflip Pro XT 712 Tablet Unboxing and Review

Last week, Flipkart stepped into the electronics market with the launch of its own tablet – the Digiflip Pro XT712. Much like the Amazon Kindle Fire, the Digiflip will serve as a vehicle to increase customer engagement with various Flipkart products. However, unlike the Kindle, Digiflip doesn’t quite put Flipkart left, right, and center. Instead, it offers an almost pure stock Android experience with a couple of bundled Flipkart apps. But, before getting into the details of the software, let’s take a closer look the hardware.

Digiflip by Flipkart

Unboxing the Digiflip

The packaging is neat and functional. Lifting the thermocol seat that comfortably houses the Digiflip, reveals the accessories compartment. Included in the package are a power adaptor (along with an USB cable), an in-ear earphone, an earphone converter, a manual, and a soft wipe. I also ordered the book case, which was available at 50% discount.

DigiFlip by FlipKart Unboxing 1

DigiFlip by FlipKart Unboxing 2

DigiFlip by FlipKart Unboxing 3

DigiFlip by FlipKart Unboxing 4

DigiFlip by FlipKart Unboxing 5

DigiFlip by FlipKart Unboxing 6

DigiFlip by FlipKart Unboxing 7

DigiFlip by FlipKart Unboxing 8 Flipkart Digiflip Unboxing

Appearance and Display

The Digiflip is sturdily built, and feels solid and reassuring. There’s no metal here, but the polycarbonate body manages to avoid the cheap plasticky feeling. The power button and volume controls are on the top left, but there is no physical camera button. The 3.5 mm earphone jack is on the top, while the micro-USB port is at the bottom. The speaker grill is just beneath the front camera.

The Digiflip Pro sports a 7’’ IPS display with a resolution of resolution of 1280 X 800, which amounts to a 216 ppi pixel-density. If you look closely, you can spot the pixels, and outdoor visibility is just about decent. However, considering the price range, the display is actually quite decent, with good contrast and viewing angles.

Flipkart Digiflip Tablet - Front
Flipkart Digiflip Tablet – Front
Flipkart Digiflip Tablet - Side
Flipkart Digiflip Tablet – Side


Perhaps the weakest point of the Digiflip Pro is the hardware powering the tablet. It uses the low-end MediaTek MT8382 chipset, which houses a 1.3 GHZ Quad Core CPU. GeekBench3 benchmark suggests that the CPU is on par with flagships from a couple of years back. The GPU is Mali 400 MP2 clocked at 500 MHz This is even weaker than the CPU, and is comparable to GPUs that Android flagships like the Galaxy SII were using as far back as 2011. Quite obviously, with such an outdated hardware, the Digiflip Pro doesn’t fare very well in synthetic benchmarks.

Flipkart Digiflip Benchmark - Geekbench 3 Single Core
Flipkart Digiflip Benchmark – Geekbench 3 Single Core
Flipkart Digiflip Benchmark - Geekbench 3 Multi Core
Flipkart Digiflip Benchmark – Geekbench 3 Multi Core
Flipkart Digiflip Benchmark - Basemark X
Flipkart Digiflip Benchmark – Basemark X
Flipkart Digiflip Benchmark - 3D Mark
Flipkart Digiflip Benchmark – 3D Mark

Synthetic benchmarks aside, the Digiflip performs quite well for regular day to day tasks. Web browsing experience is smooth, as is watching videos on YouTube. It handles casual games like EA Golf and Score! With ease, but if you’re planning on playing more heavy duty games, this is not the tablet for you.


The Digiflip features a 5 megapixel rear camera with flash and autofocus that’s capable of recording videos at 1080p. The front camera is takes snaps at 2 megapixels. On paper all of these specs sound decent enough, but specs can be deceiving. There’s no way to sugar coat this. The Digiflip camera is bad. Both the front and the back camera fail to take a decent picture in any lighting. Using the flash over exposes the picture to the point of hiding any detail in the image. Here are a few sample images captured with the rear camera.

Flipkart Digiflip Camera Sample - Outdoor
Flipkart Digiflip Camera Sample – Outdoor
Flipkart Digiflip Camera Sample - Indoor with Florescent Light
Flipkart Digiflip Camera Sample – Indoor with Florescent Light
Flipkart Digiflip Camera Sample - Indoor with Flash
Flipkart Digiflip Camera Sample – Indoor with Flash

Flipkart uses MxPlayer, which is a great decision, given that it’s one of the most versatile players available in the market. MxPlayer managed to play back any video I threw at it, and had no issues in with playing back 720p HD videos, even with software renderer. 1080p videos, however, proved to be too much to handle for the software renderer (none of the formats I had worked with hardware renderer).

The stereo speaker won’t impress anyone with its loudness or quality, but it gets the job done. And, thankfully, it’s front-facing, which means most of the time (but not always) it’s loud enough to be audible. As I mentioned earlier, the Digiflip accessories bundle also includes an earphone adaptor. The reason behind this is that the Digiflip uses OMTP standard, which pretty much everyone else has abandoned. If you want to use your Apple devices compatible existing earphone on the Digiflip or the Digiflip earphone on other new electronic devices, you’ll need to use the bundled CTIA-OMTP converter. As far as the earphone itself is concerned, it’s not very good. But, even using a different pair will only help improve sound quality marginally, as Digiflip’s audio processor itself seems to produce a lot of noise.

Connectivity options include dual-SIM 3G HSPA+, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.0 LE, and USB OTG. There’s no NFC. The battery is not removable and is rated at 3000 mAh battery with a talk time of around 8 hours. Digiflip ships with 16 gigs of internal storage (out of which about 12 gigs is available to the user), and supports micro SD cards up to 32 GB.


The Digiflip runs an almost stock Android 4.2.2 (Jellybean). While I’m glad that Flipkart chose to provide a near stock experience, it’s disappointing that the version of Android that Digiflip is shipping with is over sixteen months old. Given that there are no custom modifications to handle, I don’t understand why the Digiflip couldn’t ship with KitKat. What’s worrying is that Flipkart hasn’t even committed to shipping KitKat or newer builds.

Flipkart Digiflip Homescreen
Flipkart Digiflip -Homescreen
Flipkart Digiflip - Version Info
Flipkart Digiflip – Version Info

While Flipkart hasn’t modified the core Android experience, the Digiflip comes bundled with Flipkart shopping and eBook apps, which aren’t removable. The eBook app comes bundled with a dozen eBooks work Rs. 2, 300, while the shopping app includes various coupons with a cumulative discount of Rs. 5000. Each coupon can only be used once, and is valid until the end of the year.

Flipkart Digiflip - Free eBooks
Flipkart Digiflip – Free eBooks


The Digiflip is a rather well rounded tablet, whose main draw is obviously the low price point (Rs. 9,999). The added goodies thrown in by Flipkart (including a Platronics Bluetooth headset) sweeten the deal further. The weakest link of the Digiflip is its low-end chipset, which makes it unsuitable for heavy duty tasks. The camera output is also disappointing. However, the near stock Android helps the tablet to remain snappy and it’s well suited as a media consumption device. The Digiflip is all about making the right compromises. It doesn’t have any killer features to set it apart from the crowd. However, there’ also no Achilles’ heels. For a budget tablet, that can often prove to be enough.

The Surface Family Evolves: Where Does It Go from Here?

On May 20, Microsoft officials announced the latest entry in the family of Surface devices, the Surface Pro 3. This device is a larger form with many updates to the existing pro device, the Surface Pro 2, and comes only eight months since the launch of the Surface Pro 2. So now, Microsoft has launched three generations of Surface in the span of less than two years, being incredible for a company which only recently pivoted to devices and services from software.

Surface Pro 3
Surface Pro 3

The launch of Surface Pro 3 however raised several questions: why isn’t there a Surface 3 (the ARM-based version) to complement the Surface Pro 3? Why also, didn’t the much-rumored Surface Mini launch alongside the Surface Pro 3? What is the goal of these Surface devices, according to Microsoft?


Where is Windows RT?

The first two questions have a common thread, and that is Windows RT. The ARM-based version of Windows has had very little success both from OEM adoption as well as sales perspectives. OEMs have slowly been pulling out of making such devices, and with Nokia’s devices group now a part of Microsoft, Microsoft is the only company that makes Windows RT devices. The operating systems group at Microsoft is undergoing some level of consolidation and transformation, and there is a possibility of some fundamental changes coming to the Windows RT OS as it merges with Windows Phone OS. It would be somewhat silly to offer a Windows RT device that may need some major updates in a few months when the operating system makes potentially big underlying changes. Also, let’s not forget that Nokia also makes a Windows RT device (Lumia 2520) which may now become a contender to be the only Windows RT device Microsoft produces. Hence, the lack of ARM-based Surface at this point in time.


No room for Surface Mini

Surface Mini on the other hand, has a bigger issue. The rumors were that it would be an 8” device and regardless of whether it was going to be an Intel-based device or an ARM-based device, it would really offer no differentiation from the several other 8” Windows devices in the market today. All of the existing devices are Intel-based and as a result, are able to run old Windows desktop programs just fine. Most of these existing devices are also priced at the very low end and as a result, Microsoft would have to start competing on the low end which I am not sure they want to do. There are also rumors that Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella and the new devices chief Stephen Elop decided to remove that device from the announcement for precisely that reason – it offered no differentiation from whatever else is out there in the market. If that is in fact the case, I commend them for doing so since it is not easy to change directions this way and at the last moment.


Who is the Surface for? What does Surface mean for Microsoft?

That brings us to the last question – what is the role of Surface devices? Microsoft executives have constantly said that Surface is not meant to compete with the OEMs but instead be a reference design for OEMs. However, the huge write-off Microsoft took at the end of the past fiscal year related to excess inventory of the original Surface shows that at least someone at Microsoft expected to sell these devices in larger volumes.

The Surface Pro 3 is indeed unlike anything else in the market today, both from a Windows devices perspective as well as the competition’s devices. There are Android tablets of all shapes and sizes that are selling quite well, but they are limited to a maximum of 10” form factor, and while there have been rumors of an “iPad Pro” sporting a larger display than the current iPad, those have been simply rumors. At the launch event, Microsoft made the point that the Surface Pro 3 is aimed squarely at the laptop user (there were a *lot* of MacBook Air comparisons) rather than the tablet user. The viewpoint they provided was that most of the iPad customers also have or buy a laptop, so why not make a device that can do both the tasks well? The Surface Pro 3 specifications are obviously more “computer”-like than “tablet”-like, starting with the processor which is not an Atom variant but in fact, it is a Core processor. At the same time, it is so much lighter than a laptop – even MacBook Air that they compared to at the event – that you could see yourself using it as a tablet every so often.

The Surface Pro 3 pricing is in line with a mid- to high-end laptop, depending on the configuration you choose. You could get the entry-level model with a Core i3 processor and 64GB storage for $799 and the highest-end model with a Core i7 processor and 512GB storage for $1,949. Both the ends of that spectrum are higher than the average for a Windows laptop with similar specifications.

Another example to understand where Microsoft is going with this family of devices is the included (and completely re-done) pen. There is a deep integration built into the pen which enables the customer to launch OneNote even when the screen is locked. The OneNote emphasis shows not just the integration aspects but also the intended, or expected, use of the device.


Surface Pro 3 Numbers
Surface Pro 3 Numbers

The screen at an excellent 2160×1440 resolution, the aspect ratio which is a much better 3:2 than 16:9, the higher power processor and the pricing all point to a realization at Microsoft that it is better to compete with the laptop than with the iPad. Think creative professionals like artists, medical professionals, or the “information worker” in corporations. Think students on a budget, who have the funds to buy only one device which needs to be their television, book reader as well as productivity tool. These are the customers Microsoft seems to be aiming at with their Surface Pro devices now.

So Microsoft is clearly going for the laptop user and giving that user the choice of using that device as a tablet. They know that the OEMs are able to compete at the low-end, especially with the recent announcement of making Windows free for 9” and lower screens. Knowing that Apple has consistently outsold Windows in the PC sales for the past several years, it makes sense for Microsoft to address the high margin area so they don’t have to sell extremely large volumes in order to justify the business.

I still expect Microsoft to release the mini tablet, and there are multiple possibilities there too: a productivity mini tablet which would have the upcoming touch version of Office (codename Gemini); a larger phablet-style device like the Lumia 1520 and of course, a gaming-oriented mini tablet with some type of Xbox brand and tie-in. All of those have dependencies that need to be addressed before these products can come to market in order to differentiate themselves from the competition.

There is an empirical truth to Microsoft products: by version 3, they perfect the product. Surface Pro 3 surely looks like a “perfect” product, we will see if the market agrees with Microsoft or not. The Surface business has steadily grown in volume and with Windows 8.1, Microsoft may have enough to get CIOs interested in upgrading to Windows 8.1. If so, there is a large-sized market opportunity that is for Microsoft to dominate, given their past relationships and reputation in the enterprise. If that happens, it may create the virtuous cycle that Microsoft has been able to create in the past with Windows and even now with Office. Many will use these devices in school and workplace and would like to continue that experience at home.

Microsoft certainly seems to demonstrate that it is in the devices market for the long run. Naturally, mastering manufacturing cannot happen overnight. It is now up to the customers to decide if all of that is worth it, by speaking with their wallets.

Are you interested in the Surface Pro 3? Were you disappointed by the absence of the Surface Mini? Sound off in the comments below.

(All images and the video, courtesy Microsoft’s official websites)

Who is the Target Customer for Surface Windows 8 Pro?

The embargo lifted on Surface Windows 8 Pro or as I will call it, Surface Pro, reviews and out of the gate, most tech news sites had a “meh” conclusion. The device, they claimed, is neither a great tablet nor a great Ultrabook. Hence, their take away was that it is not a good device for either use case. A few sites mentioned that it is not for all, but for those who need such a device, it is a great one for them.

Who is the target customer for such a device? Is it a big enough market for Microsoft to pursue, or is it a niche that may explode in the future?

First, let’s remove the obvious non-market. This device is not for those who have truly moved into the “post-PC era” and are ok using just a tablet for their computing needs. It means they either don’t need programs that need a “computer”, or they have decent alternatives available in the tablet’s app marketplace to accomplish all their computing on the tablet. For such a market (many of the tech writers may be in this category, since most of their work is writing and with decent keyboard attachments, they can somehow make it work), a tablet like the iPad with a much lower cost and a much better battery life may easily be a better choice than the Surface Pro.

Surface Pro is also not for those who don’t mind carrying two devices around, or having two devices in general. They have a computer, perhaps even an actual desktop PC, where they do all their work. In addition, they have a tablet where they do most of their “play”, and have some sort of connectivity established to their workplace email so they can keep on top of email while they are away from the office. These folks are perfectly ok with two separate devices because they may not be carrying both around much.

There is an important market though, which many/most of the reviewers failed to recognize, either due to ignorance or oversight. The typical office worker. Millions of employees around the world are handed a laptop when they join a company. Earlier, it used to be dull Windows PCs from a single supplier. Nowadays the choice has expanded to include Macs as well. However, many of these office workers also carry tablets around the office because they don’t want to or they don’t need to carry their PCs around to conference rooms and to meetings. These folks will absolutely love the Surface Pro (especially the ones who did not choose a Mac :-)).

For the office worker, the Surface Pro provides a powerful PC for all they do at their desk, but instead of leaving the PC at the desk and carrying a separate tablet to meetings, or to use at home for “play”, they can have the same device for both those purposes. Since the “work PC” is normally plugged in, the lower battery life of Surface Pro compared to the iPad would not be a big factor. Also, since the device won’t be used purely as a tablet, the slightly higher weight compared to most tablets would also not be a concern.

On the other hand, having one device instead of two would be a benefit in favor of the Surface Pro. The Surface Pro would weigh less than the combined weight of a PC and a tablet, and because it is one machine, the office worker would not need to keep shuttling files between the two devices with or without the cloud. Also, there would be no issues about apps and application compatibility and maintaining document fidelity. All these are important considerations for many, many employees around the world.  Needless to say, there were many on the Surface Pro team’s Reddit Ask Me Anything thread who claimed that they would be getting a Surface Pro (or their company is testing the device for mass deployment, or as one person said, it would be great to load Linux and use it!).

From the CIO’s perspective, the Surface Pro offers an ideal solution to the BYOD movement. Since it runs Windows, it is a highly manageable device, and it would work with all the existing management infrastructure. The CIO gets to sleep at night, and the employees get something that is thin, light and works for work and works for play.

There may be other scenarios too, where the Surface Pro may work quite well, but I focused mostly on the biggest piece of the pie, the enterprise worker.

What’s your take? Let me know in the comments!



Dell Latitude 10 Tablet Review

Windows 8 has been with us for about few months now, and despite being the first consumer release of Windows which is optimized for both touch and non-touch interfaces, the supporting hardware from a touch-interface point of view has been basically non-existent. Sure, there’s the Surface, but trying to get it here in India isn’t exactly straightforward. Thankfully, Dell’s stepped in and released the Dell Latitude 10 Tablet. Dell sent me a review unit & I had a chance to play it for a week. Let’s see how it fares.

Tablet Specifications

The Dell Latitude 10 is based on Intel’s Atom Z2760 (Codenamed Clovertrail) processor & runs Windows 8 Pro, not the RT edition. Here’s some more detailed specs

  • Processor: Intel Atom  Z2760 @ 1.80GHz
  • Main memory: 2GB DDR2 SDRAM
  • 64GB SSD
  • Graphics Card: Intel Graphics Media Accelerator
  • 10.1″ IPS screen with 1366×768 resolution
  • Expansion & Misc ports: 1xUSB, 1xHeadphone out, 1xMini HDMI, 1x MicroSD, 1xMicro SIM slot

Packaging, Looks, Build Quality & Weight

The Latitude tablet was packaged in a box very similar to the one which came with the Dell XPS 13 Ultrabook. The box was a laptop briefcase-esque carton, thought unlike the XPS 13 carton, there was a lack of foam padding. Inside the “briefcase” was the tablet placed in the cardboard box. The box contents were minimal — the box featured just the tablet and the power adapter and power cord. The absence of other accessories is surprising, considering the expansion options that the tablet has — especially with the presence of mini HDMI port. A bundled mini-HDMI or a Mini-HDMI to HDMI converter would have have been much welcome.

With an all-black body the Latitude looks pretty slick. The front of the tablet gets a big 10.1″ highly glossy reflective screen, with a GorillaGlass protection, while the back of the tablet has a more subdued, matte-grey with rubber finishing to prevent slippage. There’s a pretty thick bezel however, that tends to detract from the looks of the tablet.

Dell Latitude 10

The rounded corners on the tablet edges mean that you wouldn’t run into any sharp cuts. The Latitude 10 weighs in at about 650g for the 2-cell battery version. However, the review unit came with the optional 4-cell, 60Whr battery, tipping the weighing scales at a hefty 820g. With either versions, it’s practically not possible to operate the tablet with one hand, and you’ll definitely not be using it as a bed-side device for reading.

Connectivity options

For a tablet, the Latitude comes with a bunch of connectors – you get a USB port, a mini-HDMI port, headphone jack, a microUSB port for charging, and a dock connector. In addition, there’s also support for a SD card and a microSIM port. The microSIM slot, however, is very easy to ignore and dismiss – much like cell phones, the microSIM slot is under the battery which also makes hot swapping SIM cards impossible. Despite these connectivity options, you’ll have to invest in your own cables and accessories — Dell, in it’s infinite wisdom thought it was a great idea to skip out on all cables and leave you with the job of getting your own cables.

Touchscreen, Display & Audio Quality

Touchscreens generally make or break a tablet – I’ve played with few el-cheapo tablets which gee-whiz-bang specs, only for me to not look at them at all because of their pathetic touchscreen response. With this in mind, I’m very happy to say that the Latitude’s touchscreen is simply fantastic. There was nary a touch that went undetected. To make things even better, the the Latitude’s 10.1″ IPS screen is simply brilliant. Though not in the same league as the iPad’s Retina displays, one glance at the screen with Windows 8’s Start Screen & Live tiles on and it’s near impossible to turn away from the screen. The combination of the brilliant display and fantastic touchscreen response means that you’ll find it very hard to keep your hands off the tablet. The weight of the tablet, however, will make you want to keep it down on the table, or attached to a dock however.

To achieve the fantastic display quality, however, Dell’s opted for a highly reflective, glossy screen. I’m not a huge fan of glossy screens – the light reflection tends to hit my eyes hard, and with my vision problems, causes unwanted strain on my eyes. The Latitude is no different, with even a tubelight lit overhead will result in tubelight rays bouncing off the tablet and hitting your eyes. To make matters worse, the screen is also huge fingerprint magnet – just a day of swiping about and the screen was coated with my fingerprints. I had to resort to using my LCD screen cleaner to keep the fingerprints at bay and I suspect this is likely to be a daily affair.

Dell Latitude 10

Dell Latitude 10 screen

The Latitude’s audio quality wasn’t too bad.  The built-in stereo speakers were loud enough to be heard on a average sized room and performed well. There’s only a 3.5mm jack for connecting a headphone/earphones. The tablet also comes with a 2MP front facing camera & a 8MP rear camera with LED flash. I didn’t get a chance to try out either of the cameras, so I can’t  comment on the picture quality.

Performance And Battery Life

When I first discovered that the tablet features an Atom processor – I wondered what sort of performance I should expect from it. Traditionally, Atom processors aren’t exactly known for the processing prowess. The newer Atom processors codenamed CloverTrail however – performed admirably well. The response of the tablet was pretty zippy, and there was no sign of lag even with a bunch of Modern UI apps running in the background. I didn’t bother running any of the traditional PC-based benchmarking programs, since the scores will be low and there’s no real way to compare the numbers against anything else. Suffice to say, the Tablet was able to cope up with most content consumption activities – be it using YouTube, watch a hi-def movie using VLC or anything else for that matter – the tablet just hummed along fine

Battery performance on the tablet was just brilliant. Throughout my week-long review period, I charged it just once, with an average usage of 2-3 hours, on WiFi. With continuous usage, I think it’s fair to assume that the tablet should last a business day quite easily. Granted, this was on the 4-cell, 60Whr battery, but even on the regular 2-cell battery, the tablet should easily give you about 5-6 hours of battery backup.

Pricing And Conclusion

With all of these goodies, the Dell Latitude’s pricing isn’t too bad – it retails at Rs 47,290, excluding taxes and comes with a 1-year warranty. While strictly not an Apples-to-apples comparison, the current gen iPad with 64GB capacity and 4G is priced at about Rs 52,000 to give you a fair idea where it stands at.

Ultimately though, the Dell Latitude 10, while being a great device, doesn’t seem to be targeted at the home/average user. With the Latitude branding that’s popular among corporates, the security features make it clear that that’s their target audience. Which is a shame because with a little bit of tweaking on the price, the Dell Latitude 10 can be a worthy alternative for the iPad, especially if you don’t want to give up on your existing Windows applications, while simultaneously trying out the Modern UI apps that Microsoft is going with the road ahead.


  • Great battery life
  • Great display and touchscreen performance
  • Great build quality


  • Highly reflective screen which is also a fingerprint magnet
  • Weight adds up at the higher end of the tablet


End of the PC Era: Dell Buyout, Problems for Microsoft and Intel

After Apple launched the iPad in 2010, the technology market was disrupted. The PC gave way to touchscreen tablets. Many Goliath’s at the time, like Dell, Microsoft, and Intel saw the tablet market as being complimentary instead of as a substitute to their PC and laptop market.

“Tablets have dramatically changed the device landscape for PCs, not so much by cannibalizing PC sales, but by causing user shift to tablets,” says Mikako Kitagawa, principal analyst of Gartner.

The end of the PC era seemed all too clear with the dismal earnings shown by HP and Dell last quarter. Today it seems that Dell, which is the master of custom-delivered computers, is in talks for a buyout. Sources have said that Silver Lake Partners was in discussions with Dell for a leveraged buyout at around $13 to $14 per share. This will be one of the largest deals since the global recession.

This is seen as a desperate attempt by Dell to focus on new areas away from its core PC business. Its decline has been the worst in its sectors after its shipments fell by 21% to 9.2 million. This news resulted in a surge of its stock price to $12.29.  Dell has declined to comments on these developments.

Consumers are flocking towards tablets. A recent study has already claimed that at the current rate, tablets will outsell notebooks this year. This may be due to the booming tablet market in China and the recession. The report explains that tablet shipments will reach more than 240 million units worldwide this year, with notebooks forecast to reach 207 million units.

After Microsoft launched Windows 8 in October last year, the expected boost to their sales would have come from users who upgrade their operating systems, in addition to users who buy new PCs or laptops. However, the declining PC sales (down 6.4% in the last year) will give them cause for concern.

The rise of mobile systems is not helping Intel either. Its era of extraordinary profits and market invincibility seems to have come to an end. Intel’s shares have fallen by over 7% last year. Its competitors are chip manufacturers for tablets and smartphones who have to work with smaller profit margins. Having said that, Intel’s server chip market is still growing very fast. This is mainly due to the rise of cloud services. Also, Intel is fighting back with a strong focus on Ultrabook laptops that have touch screens.

(Source: Gartner and Reuters)

Videocon Launches Dual-Core Jelly Bean Tablet for Rs. 11000

Google and Amazon rained on the parade of budget Android tablet manufacturers with the Nexus and Kindle Fire series respectively. However, both of those devices aren’t officially available in India, which has left the field open for Indian brands as well as Chinese manufacturers. Videocon is hoping to grab a slice of this market with its new VT10 tablet.


As you might have guessed from the naming scheme, the Videocon VT10 is a 10” tablet. It sports a capacitive touchscreen with a resolution of 1280×800, which is pretty good for a budget tablet. It’s powered by a 1.5 GHz Snapdragon processor, which is again better than what is found in most budget tablets in India, but not as powerful as the Nvidia Tegra 3. The VT10 is equipped with 1 gigabyte of RAM, and 8 gigabytes of storage. You will almost certainly fill up the limited internal storage quickly. Thankfully, the VT10 includes support for external memory up to 32 GB. Both front and rear-cams are 2 megapixels, and the battery is rated at a hefty 6800mAh. The VT10 is Wi-Fi only, but supports 3G dongles. The default packaging includes an adapter, headset, battery, HDMI cable, OTG cable, and manual.

On paper, the VT10 appears to be a competitive tablet, which makes just the right compromises. However, its biggest draw isn’t really the hardware specifications. It’s the software and the price. The Videocon VT10 ships with Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean), and is available for purchase from Snapdeal and HomeShop18 for Rs. 11200 (about $204) with free shipping.

Panasonic Launches Windows 8 Powered Convertible Notebook for Outdoor Use

It has been barely a couple of weeks since Windows 8 was launched; however, we already have quite a few convertible Windows 8 laptops that can double up as tablets. Panasonic has just thrown its hat into the fray with the Toughbook CF-C2. However, unlike other OEMs, Panasonic isn’t really gunning for the consumer market.


The Toughbook CF-C2 is a niche product that is designed as a work device. Panasonic describes its convertible notebook as ideal for professionals like field and service engineers, and healthcare workers. It believes that the CF-C2 can easily deal with the knocks and scrapes of a busy mobile workers day, and can withstand drops of up to 76cm (6angles). It comes with a water resistant keyboard and touchpad and strengthened glass on the LCD. The 12.5” HD IPS display is advertised to have excellent outdoor visibility and wide viewing angles. The display is capable of recognizing up to 5 simultaneous touches. The Toughbook is powered by Intel Core i5-3427U vPro, and ships with 4 GB RAM (extendable to 8 GB). For imaging needs, you have high definition (720p) front camera, with an optional HD rear cam. Business’ can optionally add modem, VGA port, and serial port to increase compatibility with legacy devices. Connectivity options include Bluetooth 4.0, Wireless LAN a/b/g/n and optional Sierra MC8305 3G module.


The Panasonic Toughbook CF-C2 Is obviously not for everyone. However, business users seeking a flexible and powerful rugged laptop for outdoor use can purchase the CF-C2 starting January 2013. The base model will cost Rs. 1 lakh without taxes in India.

How to Order a Surface in India

While Microsoft has made it’s flagship Windows RT tablet – Surface – available in seven countries, India has been left out from the list. Bhaskar Pramanik, Chairman, Microsoft India gave no definite answers on the availability when I put the question to him at the launch event of Windows 8. While the strategic decision to keep Surface off India might please the OEMs in India, it certainly is irking the Windows 8 fans and early technology adopters in the country. 

Unless you have an uncle or a good friend travelling from the US who can carry a Surface for you, here are all the ways to buy a Surface RT online in India. While all the three options promise a similar delivery time-frame (around two weeks), there is no option yet to buy either the Type Cover or other Surface accessories.

eBay India

The premier shopping portal for anything that’s not available on the retail shelves, eBay of course was the first to have Surface listings. The price starts at INR 38,490 for the base 32GB model without a cover. The popular seller also lists Surface with Touch Cover in different colors. Amongst the three options, eBay is the only one that provides EMI facility for certain credit cards.


Tradus.com, another one of India’s growing online malls, also lists Surface at a similar price of INR 38,840 (Link). There is no listing for the product with keyboard cover though.


ShopYourWorld, an online store that offers Indian consumers the ability to shop from a wide range of products from the US and the UK, also lists the base 32GB model for INR 36,783 (Link). Again, like Tradus, there is no option to buy the tablet with the keyboard cover.

ASUS Unveils The Padfone 2 – Quad Core Snapdragon, 2GB RAM And A Sleeker Tablet Dock!

ASUS was going to unveil the Padfone 2 along with its other accessories at an event in Milan today. However, the company has already gone ahead and previewed the handset at its headquarter in Taiwan.

The Asus Padfone 2 packs in a 4.7-inch SuperIPS+ display with 720p resolution, 2GB of RAM, a Qualcomm APQ8064 quad-core Krait processor clocked at 1.5GHz, and an Adreno 320GPU. There is a 1.2MP camera in the front coupled with a 13MP sensor at the back with a f/2.4 BSI, capable of recording videos in 1080p resolution or at 720p at 60FPS. All the other usual connectivity features are also present including NFC, along with a fixed internal battery of 2140mAh.

Sadly, the Padfone 2 will be running on stock Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich when launched, but ASUS has promised that it will update the device to Jelly Bean sooner than later.

The tablet dock of the Padfone 2 packs in a 10.1-inch IPS HD display, with an inbuilt battery of 5000mAh. The new dock is much sleeker and lighter, thanks to a reduction in battery capacity and the removal of the docking bay cover. ASUS has also gone ahead and replaced the old 40 pin connector on the Padfone 2 and its tablet dock with a smaller 13-pin connector.

The ASUS Padone 2, along with all its accessories, will be available in Taiwan as early a next week for NT$17,990 for the 16GB variant. The tablet dock costs NT$8,990 when purchased separately but the handset and the dock can be purchased in a bundle for only $NT6,000 extra over the phone’s retail price.

Kobo Unveils New eReaders and an Android Tablet

Kobo, which has been largely overshadowed by Amazon and Barnes & Noble in the eReader category, has announced a series of new devices targeted primarily at the eReader and tablet markets. It has launched two new eReaders, Kobo Glo and Kobo Mini, and an Android tablet, the Kobo Arc.

Kobo Mini

The Kobo Mini is a $79 device which comes with a 5 inch E-ink display and 2 GB of internal storage. It also offers Wi-Fi and will compete with the basic Kindle.

Kobo Glo

The Kobo Glo is a $129 device, and comes with a ComfortLight display which enables night-time reading. It has a 6 inch display, and couples internal storage with a microSD slot.

Kobo Arc

This is the most interesting device Kobo unveiled. It is a 7 inch tablet which is priced at $199 for 8 GB and $249 for 16 GB. It comes with a 1.5 GHz dual core processor, and is powered by Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich, presumably with a customized Kobo UI. It also has 1 GB of RAM and an IPS display with a resolution of 1280 x 800 pixels.

However, we expect Amazon to release an upgraded Kindle Fire today, which could pretty easily beat this device, not only in terms of hardware, but also pricing and content.

Let’s just wait and watch.

via Techcrunch