Tag Archives: Sony

EA Also Inserts Class-Action Lawsuit Prevention Clause in Origin’s EULA

In all honesty, Sony’s lawsuit prevention clause in its PlayStation Network Terms of Service (ToS) is quite fancy. If you agree to section 15 of its new ToS, you are essentially waiving your right to a class-action lawsuit against Sony Network Entertainment International, LLC (SNEI) and in effect you are giving the gaming giant free reign to do whatever it wishes to do with your account and registered games.

origin_logo

Electronic Arts (EA), the gargantuan beast of gaming decided that Sony’s ToS change is pioneering and went about copying that to its own End User License Agreement (EULA) for the Origin digital distribution store that it operates. If you accept these terms of service, you will be denied the right to sue and bring the company to trial by jury. Only individual cases will be considered against the giant.

By accepting these terms, you and EA expressly waive the right to a trial by jury or to participate in a class action.
YOU UNDERSTAND THAT BY THIS PROVISION, YOU AND EA ARE FOREGOING THE RIGHT TO SUE IN COURT AND HAVE A JURY TRIAL.
YOU AND EA AGREE THAT EACH MAY BRING CLAIMS AGAINST THE OTHER ONLY IN YOUR OR ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY, AND NOT AS A PLAINTIFF OR CLASS MEMBER IN ANY PURPORTED CLASS OR REPRESENTATIVE PROCEEDING.

One can opt out of both of these binders by submitting a written application to the company, but why is that even necessary when these clauses can be done away with entirely?

It is rather sad to see that these pinnacles of the industry put forth these gags against the civil voice instead of making sure that the service they provide is hassle-free and fair for both the users as well as the developers.

Sony Tablet S and Tablet P Announced

Sony today at IFA 2011 announced two tablets, the Tablet S and Tablet P. The Tablet S was initially rumored as S1 while Tablet P was rumored as S2. The Tablet S has a unique and attractive folded’ design which has a good grip when held in portrait style, while Tablet P is a dual screen tablet and can be folded to fit in the pocket.

sony-tablet-s

The Tablet S and Tablet P sports Nvidia’s Tegra 2 SoC and has 1GB of RAM. The Tablet P comes with a 9.4LED (tru-black) screen with a resolution of 1200*800 and weighs 1.33 lbs. It has a 5MP rear camera and a VGA front camera. It also has a SD card slot and a USB slot. But there is a catch in the expandable SD card; you won’t be able to play contents on the SD card directly. For playing contents on the SD card you’ll first have to copy it into the internal storage and then play it. The Tablet S will have only Wi-Fi support, if anyone was expecting 3G/4G support will be disappointed.

sony s1, s2 tablets

Both the tablets will sport Android 3.1 at release. There are few services which Sony will be offering with their tablets like Video Unlimited and Music Unlimited. By Video Unlimited you can either buy or rent latest releases. Initially, the content will be limited but more will be added later. Music Unlimited will offer over 10 millions songs from major record labels and will have six months free trail. Moreover, both the tablets are Play Station certified and two PS 1 games will come pre installed.

The Tablet S will be available from mid-September in 16 GB and 32 GB versions and will cost $499 and $599, respectively.

The Tablet P has 5.5″ twin-screens with a resolution of 1024*800. It has a 5MP rear and a VGA front camera, just like in Tablet S. It has a 4GB internal memory and a expandable SD card slot. This tablet is 4G capable exclusively on AT&T. It also has a 3080 mAh battery. The Tablet P will sport Android 3.2 at release.  The price of the device is not disclosed and it is expected to release later this year.

(  UPDATED:  Details of Tablet P.)

Sony Reader T1 Leaked by Overzealous Retailer

The Dutch web retailer bol.com has revealed Sony’s next Reader – the PRS-T1. Although Sony still trails Amazon by a large margin, it has been doing reasonably well in the eBook reader market. At the very least, Sony has managed to offer stiff competition to Barnes and Noble, which has managed to innovate its way into the segment with the Android powered Nook readers.

Sony-Reader-T1

The T1, which was spotted last month in an FCC application, will have an E-Ink screen just like its predecessors. E-Ink screens mimic the appearance of ordinary ink on paper, and are easier on the eyes as well as the battery. According to the specifications revealed by Bol.com, T1 will have a 6 inch dual-touch screen with a resolution of 800 x 600 pixels and support for pinch-to-zoom gesture for adjusting font size. A stylus shouldn’t be necessary; however, Sony has opted to include one nonetheless. The 2GB internal memory should be sufficient to store more than a thousand books. However, if you find yourself needing more memory you can add additional storage through microSD cards. Wi-Fi support along with Google Search and Wikipedia have also been added to the T1. Another interesting enhancement spotted by Mike Cane is that the T1 will display the cover of the book you are currently reading in standby mode.

Sony-Reader-T1

All in all, the T1 is a nice update to the current generation Sony Readers. With T1, Sony will have another well rounded reader in the market. However, it will definitely not set the e-reader segment on fire. While T1 seems good enough to maintain status quo, it doesn’t do anything that can help Sony in establishing its superiority over the Kindle or the Nook.

Sony Introduces World’s Thinnest Camera – Sony Cybershot DSC-TX55

Sony has introduced a new compact camera, Sony Cyber-shot TX55, which it claims to be the world’s thinnest camera at just 12.2 mm (0.5″) in thickness.

The Cyber-shot TX55 is the world’s thinnest camera in its class (among cameras with an optical anti-shake function). It redefines what a compact camera can do. In addition to the newly developed, ultra-thin chassis design, the camera features an incredible combination of features and performance, putting more creativity at users’ fingertips than ever before.

The new cyber-shot comes with Carl Zeiss Vario-Tessa lens that is paired with a 16.2 megapixel Exmor R CMOS sensor.   The camera’s 5x optical zoom is further improvised by the company’s ‘By Pixel Super Resolution’ process. With the touch of the shutter button, the Dual Rec takes 12MP still images without disturbing the full HD video shooting.

 Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX55

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX55

The camera has been equipped with a 3.3-inch Xtra Fine OLED wide touchscreen and displays seven picture effect options. It’s Superior Automode lets the camera handle a number of shooting situations without any user adjustment, and the camera’s intelligent panorama tools enable users to grab panorama shots up to 42.9 megapixels.

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX55 hosts another impressive feature which is the 3D Still Image mode. The feature lets you snap two images with a single shutter speed, and enabling users to view 3D images without a stereoscopic lens. This tool can also be used to capture 3D panoramas and sweep multi-angle shots.

Sony Cybershot TX55 Complete Features:

  • DSLR-like picture quality
  • 16.2 Megapixels Exmor R CMOS sensor
  • 5x optical zoom and up to 10x with Pixel Super Resolution feature
  • Ultra-thin chassis design (12.2 mm)
  • 3D Still Image captures with 3D Sweep Panorama mode and Sweep Multi Angle
  • Full HD AVCHD video recording
  • 3.3inch Xtra Fine OLED wide touch-screen Monitor
  • Seven picture effect options includes HDR Painting, Rich-tone Monochrome, Miniature, Toy Camera, Partial Color, Pop Color and Soft High-key.
  • SteadyShot image stabilization for Full HD video shooting
  • Electronic image stabilization for vertical and horizontal handshake correction
  • Intelligent Sweep Panorama mode
  • Supports Memory Stick Micro, microSD/SDHC cards for up to 16 GB of removable storage.

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX55 will be made available in September 2011, and attaches a price tag of $350. (India Price: Approx. 20,000 ~ 25,000/- INR). It can be  purchased  from Sony stores, sonystyle.com and other authorized retailers throughout the Sony Dealer Network.

Sony S1 and S2 Tablet Captured on Images and Video

Sony announced the new Sony S1 and S2 tablets powered by Android 3.1 Honeycomb back in April, but we hadn’t seen any actual images of those devices. Today, thanks to Notebook Italia, we have some close up shots of both the tablets – the Sony S1 and S2.

As we had posted earlier, the Sony S1 sports a very stylish curved design and comes with a 9.4 inch display with a resolution of 1280 x 800 pixels. It is powered by the Nvidia Tegra 2 chipset.

The Sony S2 comes with a dual display, like the Kyocera Echo, each measuring 5.5 inches. It has a resolution of 1024 x 480 pixels. Both the tablets are Playstation certified and will support all the new Playstation titles.

I don’t quite like the Sony S2, but the Sony S1 is very appealing. Anyway, here are some of the images of the Sony S1 and Sony S2 Android tablets:

Sony S1 S2 Android Tablets

Sony S1

Sony S2

And here’s the video of the Sony S1 and S2.

Sony Launches Affordable PlayStation 3D Display Bundle

The show stealer at Sony’s E3 event was undoubtedly the PlayStation Vita. However, the Japanese entertainment behemoth had quite a few other neat surprises in store for us. One of them was the PlayStation 3D display bundle.

3D TVs are nothing new, and have been quite the rage for the past couple of years. However, one thing that has been keeping them from going mainstream is affordability, or the lack of it. The new 24 inch PlayStation 3D TV is Sony’s attempt at tackling this problem. It’s mainly targeted at gamers who want to experience the benefits of 3D, but can’t afford the high end displays with bigger screens.

PlayStation-3D-TV

It also has a unique 2D multiplayer mode. When enabled, the active shutter glasses will present two entirely different images to two different players, thus eliminating the need for split-screen view in multiplayer games. The glasses will feature a button for toggling between ‘Player 1′ and ‘Player 2′ views.

The PlayStation 3D TV bundle will include a pair of active shutter 3D glasses, HDMI cable, and a copy of the 3D game Resistance 3. The whole bundle will be available for a very decent $499, with the bundled freebies alone costing in excess of $150.

Image via Engadget

Sony Trumps Nintendo 3DS with PlayStation Vita, the PSP Successor

PlayStation-VitaA short while back, Sony Computer Entertainment president Kaz Hirai officially announced Sony’s next generation handheld gaming device the PlayStation Vita. Vita, which was originally codenamed NGP (Next Generation Portable) will succeed the ageing PlayStation Portable, which was announced way back in 2004.

PlayStation-Vita-Front

The word Vita means Life, and Sony believes that Vita has the muscles to be able to blur the differences between entertainment and real life for the first time on a handheld console. The Vita has a 4-core ARM Cortex-A9 CPU and a 200 MHz SGX543MP4+ GPU. In short, it blows away Nintendo’s 3DS and other handheld gaming devices like the Xperia Play. The powerful hardware will be well complemented by the 5 inch OLED capacitive multi-touch screen (with rear touch panel) that boasts of a resolution of 960 x 544. The combination of larger than average size with a mightily impressive resolution means that everything from games to HD Videos will look stunning on the Vita.


Vita Announcement Video

Besides the standard PlayStation buttons, the Vita has two analog sticks and a D-pad. The device also has front and rear facing cameras, stereo speakers, six-axis motion sensor, GPS, and Bluetooth connectivity.

PlayStation-Vita-Side

Sony has tied up with over 150 developers, and there should be an impressive number of titles available at launch. Games for the Vita will be distributed on NVG cards, which will be available in 2 GB and 4 GB sizes. Some of the games that have been announced include Uncharted: Golden Abyss, Killzone, LittleBigPlanet, and Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots. The Vita will also be capable of playing existing PlayStation Portable (PSP) games.

Sony is pushing augmented reality and location-aware games along with social gaming on the Vita. A feature called “Party” will allow gamers in the same room to voice chat with each other. Another feature called “Near” will allow you to connect and play with other gamers around you.

Sony will release two editions of the Vita a Wi-Fi only version for $249, and a Wi-Fi+3G version for $299. In the US, Vita will be exclusive to AT&T. It will be launched during the holiday season this year.


Vita Trailer Video

Vita’s closest competitor is obviously the Nintendo 3DS, which impressed us in last year’s E3. The 3DS’ biggest selling point is obviously its ability to support glasses free 3D imagery. However, when it comes to raw power the Vita absolutely owns the 3DS. Once again, it appears that the Nintendo’s offering will appeal more to the casual gamers, while Sony’s VIta will appeal to enthusiasts and hardcore gamers. However, at $249, the 3DS might be too expensive for casual gamers, but the Vita might be perfectly priced for gaming enthusiasts.

LulzSec Breaks Into Sony Developer Network, Leaks Their Source Code

Continuing  their recent streak of break-ins into Sony web properties, the self proclaimed “world’s leaders in high-quality entertainment at your expense” Lulzsec just released a full 54MB archive consisting of Sony Computer Entertainment’s Developer network source code. Lulzsec tweeted their latest accomplishment just under half hour ago.

Sony has been under an ever-increasing spate of attacks and break-ins – the most recent being Sony Brazil, Sony Europe and  Sony Pictures Russia which was one of the most biggest hacks with over a million user names and passwords stolen. With this latest break-in ,16 of Sony’s web properties have been hacked into just under 45 days, giving an average hack rate of an astonishing 2.8 websites hacked per day.

While Lulzsec claims that the archive comprises of the Developer  network source code, a commentator on Hacker News mentions that the archive consists of Website source code rather than the actual PSN code.

Sony Europe Website Hacked

A “gray hat hacker” known as “idahc”, who self-identifies as a Lebanese hacker, managed to hack Sony Europe’s Database of Application Store and posted the information on the Internet.

Sony Europe Website Hacked

The hacker claims to have used a simple SQL injection to gain access to credentials for 129 user accounts, including username, password and email.

Here a proof of the hack shared by The Hacker News

Sony Europe Hack Idahc (18), a computer enthusiast says that he’s bored and is keen to play the game of the year: “Hacker vs Sony”.

He states in a interview,

I think Sony did not have a team of computer security consultants, simply. They produce Internal Sites like hotcakes. The databases are not protected. No encryption. They have much, but then a lot of servers, websites, which means there will always be flawed. Nothing is 100% secure.

Few days back, Sony Pictures was hacked by LulzSec, gaining access to the information in over 1 million user accounts. Sony has contacted the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation and are working together to track down the hackers.

Sony Europe’s website is now currently down for “scheduled maintenance”.

Sony Europe App Store

LulzSec Does It Again. Sony Pictures’ Website Hacked

The LulzSec group (LulzSecurity) has done it again. They have hacked into Sony Pictures’ website, gaining access to over 1 million user account information, including passwords and email addresses.

Lulzsec reported on their website,

We recently broke into SonyPictures.com and compromised over 1,000,000 users’ personal information, including passwords, email addresses, home addresses, dates of birth, and all Sony opt-in data associated with their accounts. Among other things, we also compromised all admin details of Sony Pictures (including passwords) along with 75,000 “music codes” and 3.5 million “music coupons”.

Like the  SonyBMG hack (done by the same group), SonyPictures.com was hacked by performing a SQL injection.

Sony Pictures

It is surprising to know that all the data collected was unencrypted. The hackers state that, “every bit of data we took wasn’t encrypted. Sony stored  over 1,000,000 passwords of its customers in plaintext, which means it’s just  a matter of taking it. This is disgraceful and insecure: they were asking for it”

Rough times ahead for Sony as the LulzSec group stated that “this is the Beginning of the End for Sony”.  Possibly  Sony could face such more attacks in future.

Sony Goes Down Again, This Time SQL Injection Takes Down SonyBMG

In what seems to be yet another set of never ending series of hacks, break-ins, Sony took another hit when the Greece website of it’s music division, SonyBMG was hit by SQL injection.

Sophos reports that an anonymous poster has uploaded to pastebin.com  a full user database, including the usernames, real names and email addresses of users registered on SonyMusic.gr.

After searching a bit, I found the relevant paste where the data was uploaded(I won’t link here, you should be able to find out) – but it would appear that about 8,385 rows of user data have been leaked.

If you’ve an account at SonyMusic.gr, I recommend you change your password ASAP – else you might end up unknowingly spamming your entire contact list.

Sony Hacked Again

Hard to believe, but Sony has been hacked again!

SonyAccording to a report in the Wall Street Journal, an intruder broke into So-net Entertainment Corp, a Japanese ISP owned by Sony, and stole customers’ redeemable gift points worth about $1,225.

An official statement on the site (in Japanese) explains “What we’ve done is stopped the So-Net points exchanges and told customers to change their passwords,”

Personal information of some 100 million Sony user accounts was stolen last month when its online gaming systems,  PlayStation Network and Sony Online Entertainment were hacked.

How PlayStation Network Attack, Password Reuse And Unmonitored Account Resulted in Mass Phishing

Today seemed like just another day. Little did I know, in a span of about 20 minutes, the resulting set of events would be hugely embarrassing for me. I had barely woken up, when my phone started going bonkers with notifications coming from emails, chats & twitter replies. A glance at the notifications indicated that my email account had been compromised and phishing emails had been sent to every one in my contacts list.

The Analysis

I logged into my Google Apps email account and had a look at the recent account activity details, nothing out of the ordinary there.

Gmail Recent Account Activity

Checking the sent mail folder indicated that no emails had been sent in the recent past. It occurred to me to check my other Gmail account.

And indeed, soon as I logged in to my Gmail account, there was a huge red mark indicating activity from China.

Gmail Suspicious Activity

 

Sure enough, the Sent folder had a copy of the spam mail

Spam email

So, what went wrong? It all boils down to a culmination of the PlayStation Network hacking,  some bad habits from my yesteryear and some nice features from Gmail which resulted in the phishing email to look like it came from my current domain account instead of the old Gmail account.  Let’s have a look at each vector:

  1. PlayStation Network break-in
  2. Not monitoring my email account
  3. Password Reuse
  4. Send mail as and Reply-to set to my domain address

 

PlayStation Network break-in

PlayStation network was hacked recently, with all 77 million accounts compromised as a result of this break-in. I firmly believe this is the primary reason behind my  email account being compromised. The fact that my email account was accessed from a China IP barely 2 days after the break-in before sending off the mails is proof enough to convince me that the user information was sold off to spammers in China.

Not monitoring my email account

Before switching over to my Google Apps account, I had been using this Gmail account. Once the Google Apps account had been setup, I migrated all my contacts and mail over to my Google Apps account. Furthermore I had also used Google Apps’s Auto Forwarding to ensure that any stray email to the old id would get fetched and forwarded automatically to my new account. This resulted in me never monitoring the account. If I had monitored the account, I would have noticed the big red mark under Gmail’s unusual activity and would have changed the password right then.

Password reuse

You’ve heard this before lots of times, and probably are guilty of it – password reuse refers to using the common password across most/all of web services that you use. What starts as convenience turns out to be a single point of failure – just access to this one password is enough for spammers / hackers to gain access to all your accounts.  In my case even though password reuse is something I had kicked out quite some time ago ( thanks to LastPass), back then when I had setup my accounts – I had used the same password for Gmail & PSN. With spammers getting access to my password with the PSN break-in and my failure in having used the same password – getting access to my account was easy.

Send mail as and Reply-to set to my domain address

Gmail has this nice “Send mail as” feature – basically it allows you to send email originating from one Gmail account to appear as originating from another Gmail account(that you have access to, of course). I had used this feature, along with Reply-to set to my current email address during my stages of migration from Gmail to Google Apps. Post migration, however I let these settings remain as-is and did not change them.

End result of all of these:

  • My Gmail account was broken in
  • All the contacts in my contact list were spammed with phishing email
  • To make this worse, they appeared to have originated from my domain account, instead of the dormant Gmail account.

So, what happened then?

As I had mentioned above, soon as the email was sent, I received numerous emails, IMs, and twitter replies about phishing mail being sent from my account. I used the steps outlined by Keith in his earlier post about how to handle a situation like this. I changed the password on my prior Gmail account immediately(mind you: my previous password was not a dictionary password – and neither was it easy to guess or brute force). I sent an apology email to the unintended  recipients  of the phishing mail. (Un)fortunately, Gmail had already marked mails coming from that account as suspicious and that my account might have been compromised so I had to reply to some people mentioning that the second email was a genuine one from me.

Learnings from this event

As a Super User, I take pride (and great pains as well) in knowing and trying to ensure that accounts were never compromised. Today’s account has been a huge embarrassment – and a learning experience for me. To summarize:

  • The ghost of your past bad practices will return!
  • Never, ever let any account, especially as critical as email – even if it dormant – go unmonitored. If you aren’t using it, close it or delete it.
  • On event of any service break-in – always change the password!
  • Don’t use the same password for each service

 

 

 

Sony Finally Comes Clean on PSN and Qriocity Intrusion, Admits That Almost All User Information Was Stolen

SonySony has finally come clean on the PlayStation Network and Qriocity intrusion, and everyone’s worst fears have been realized. Last week Sony pulled down its highly popular PlayStation Network and Qriocity services, which have remained offline since. Initially, Sony offered little by the way of clarification, and only stated that they are working on rebuilding PSN and Qriocity, which have been victims of external intrusion. Rumors flew thick and fast. Most people pointed fingers at “Anonymous“, which had earlier caused temporary outages of PSN. Some suggested that Sony’s actions might have been prompted by the release of a custom firmware called Rebug, which enabled PlayStation users to pirate content from PSN using fake credit card credentials. Unfortunate, the real situation is a lot more critical.

Sony has now revealed that “certain PlayStation Network and Qriocity service user account information was compromised in connection with an illegal and unauthorized intrusion” into their network. Sony became aware of the intrusion between 17th and 19th April, and turned off PSN and Qriocity on 20th April. The intruder managed to gain access to profile data, which includes name, address (city, state, zip), country, email address, birthdate, PlayStation Network/Qriocity password and login, and handle/PSN online ID. Needless to say, all of this is extremely sensitive information. In the wrong hands, this kind of information can be misused in any number of ways. However, the bad news for PSN users doesn’t stop at this. According to the official update:

While there is no evidence at this time that credit card data was taken, we cannot rule out the possibility. If you have provided your credit card data through PlayStation Network or Qriocity, out of an abundance of caution we are advising you that your credit card number (excluding security code) and expiration date may have been obtained.

The fact that your credit card information might be up for sale is unnerving. PlayStation Network, which is accessible via the PlayStation 3 (PS3) and PlayStation Portable (PSP), has more than 60 million registered accounts. If you had your credit card information stored with either PSN or Qriocity, then it’s highly recommended that you change your credit card number. Get in touch with your credit card issuer to find out how you can do so. However, this is something that will take time. In the meanwhile, it’s recommended that you place a fraud alert on your card.

At no charge, U.S. residents can have these credit bureaus place a fraud alerton your file that alerts creditors to take additional steps to verify your identity prior to granting credit in your name. This service can make it more difficult for someone to get credit in your name. Note, however, that because it tells creditors to follow certain procedures to protect you, it also may delay your ability to obtain credit while the agency verifies your identity.

To do this, contact any one of the agencies recommended by Sony (Experia, Equifax and TransUnion). If you also have the nasty habit of using the same password for multiple services, you will have to go through the time-consuming procedure of manually changing passwords for each of those services that had the same password as your PSN account.

In the coming days and weeks, Sony will have a lot of answering to do. What is baffling me is the fact that sensitive information like account password and credit card were obtained by the hacker. It is common practice to secure such data by using encryption along with salting. Unless, the information was stored in plain text, or encrypted using weak techniques like MD5 hashing, the intruder should never be able to extract the original data. If Sony didn’t implement appropriate security measures, then they have no one to blame but themselves, and they will probably have to pay very dearly.

It was also irresponsible to sit on this information for a week before alerting affected users. Sony should have come clean as soon as they knew what had happened. Instead they seem to have been busy trying to save their own ass.

This incident once again highlights the pitfalls of storing your information on the cloud. Every time you trust an online service with your data, you add another source that might be exploited by hackers. It’s time that the congress makes it mandatory for every service that stores sensitive information like credit card numbers to have certain minimum security protections. Sony is currently working on making PSN and Qriocity more secure, and hopes to restore services, at least partially, within this week.

Plausible Reason For The PlayStation Network’s Downtime Revealed

Slight disclaimer: we do not usually beautify content from Reddit and put it up as an exclusive reveal. That is left for other blogs of repute.

PSN

A PSX-Scene.com moderator has put up a post on Reddit with a speculative reason (it may not be the real reason) as to why the PlayStation Network has   been down for a long time now. Most of the information below comes from facts and logical inferences:-

Some days ago a new Custom Firmware (CFW) called Rebug was released for the PlayStation 3. A CFW allows the user to run unsigned content. What this usually means is that Homebrew games and applications can be made to run only on a PS3 running a CFW. Whenever a PS3 is flashed with a CFW, it cannot connect to the PlayStation Network (PSN) since some necessary files for the connection are overwritten (I am not very familiar with the internal dynamics of the system).
As is usual with CFWs, third party developers caught on and released a patch that allowed users to connect to the PSN via the PlayStation Developers Network. So far, so good.

However, the trouble began when some CFW users found out that the PSN did not bother verifying your credit card credentials whenever you enter it for purchasing a game. Apparently, since the CFW is on the developer’s network, it is a trusted network so security is lax.

What followed was a torrent of piracy (I think I may be on to something with that collective noun) that led to Sony shutting down PSN and keeping mum about it for days on end.

This is a seemingly logical explanation since the chronology allows for that conclusion (from the post):-

1. Rebug was released on 3/31/11.
2. First guides of how to use the dev network to get back on COD games on 4/3/11.
3. Word of “shady” sites finding a way to pirate PSN content via the dev networks on 4/7/11 (basing this on posts I had to delete on the website). 4. PSN goes down on 4/20/11

Since Anonymous vehemently denies any hackingattempt on the PSN this could definitely be one of the reasons. It also fits under the external intrusionexplanation allegedly given by Sony, since this is technically external intrusion.

Thoughts, readers?