Download Songbird 1.8.0 For Linux

Songbird 1.8.0 has been released under the codename “Orbital” for Mac OS X and Windows. The new release has a number of improvements in terms of performance and some new features, like support for USB storage device class. The number of supported devices have also been increased.

Songbird is no longer officially supported in Linux. But, through community effort, Songbird 1.8.0 is also available for Linux; without any support, of course.

To use Songbird 1.8.0, open the terminal and download the version.

For 32-bit:


For 64-bit:


Then, extract the tarball.

For 32-bit:

tar -xzf Songbird_1.8.0-1800_linux-i686.tar.gz

For 64-bit:

tar -xzf Songbird_1.8.0-1800_linux-x86_64.tar.gz

Make the file executable.

cd Songbird
chmod u+x singbird

Then, open your file browser, go inside the Songbird folder and double-click on a file named “songbird” to launch Songbird.

Or, you can just do this from the command line:


7 Free Alternatives for Windows Media Player

While Windows Media Player is a suitable software for very basic music player functions, it has several limitations. Most music player users would want a far greater degree of flexibility in music controls. For those of you who want greater control over your music files, there are many excellent free alternatives to WMP, some of which I have compiled in the list below:

1. VLC Media Player


One of the best free multimedia players on the block, VLC Media Player is highly portable and supports a majority of audio and video formats. It can also be used for media file conversions as well as streaming protocols. I would personally recommend VLCMP for its great performance, light interface and flexibility.

[Download VLC Media Player for Windows]

2. Songbird


If you want an Open Source-customizable alternative to WMP, Songbird is the way to go. It is highly customizable with a host of plug-ins and offers the user endless hours of seamless playback. Clarity and customization come naturally to this software, which is true to its name and easily syncs with most media players and smart phones.

[Download Songbird]

3. Foobar2000


Now if being experimental is your kind of game, you needn’t look further than Foobar2000. It is an advanced Windows-based free audio player, which may not seem like much at first glance but can be completely   customized according to your wishes right from the interface itself! However, this is an audio-only software.

[Download Foobar2000]

4. KMPlayer


Another great freeware for playing a variety of audio and video files is KMPlayer. Adding to its ability to support a large number of formats is its ability to capture screenshots of audio and video.

[Download KMPlayer]

5. Media Player Classic


Although Media Player Classic looks like an older version of WMP, it has several additional features such as a built-in DVD player, AVI subtitle support etc. It is also light and can play various formats without needing any special codec.

[Download Media Player Classic]

6. GOM Player


GOM Player, or Gretech Online Movie Player is a Windows-based free media player. It scores over other traditional media players in that it can play most media files without having to obtain a codec and can also play broken, damaged or incomplete media files.

[Download GOM Player]

7. WinAmp


Finally, to conclude the list, there is good ol’ WinAmp. This player has been around for a long time indeed and supports most audio and video formats while also syncing to portable media players. It be customized and give excellent sund quality with the use of enhancing plug-ins. However, it runs a little slow, and I’ve seen from personal experience that it crashes when used with GoogleTalk.

[Download WinAmp]

Tell us what you thought of the list and do go ahead and add more free alternatives to Windows Media Player that you have used and liked! Enjoy!

FOSS Friday: Ubuntu 10.04 Beta2 Released, Songbird Drops Linux Support And More

This week we saw lots of interesting activities in FOSS. Here is our weekly roundup of the key FOSS events this week.


  • Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx Beta 2 Released

The second beta of Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx was released yesterday. Although it has some small changes, it does not have any striking difference from the earlier Beta 1. If you are using Ubuntu 10.04 Beta 1 with regular updates, there is no need to install the Beta 2 for you. You can read more here.

  • Songbird Decides to Drop Linux Support

The Pioneers of the Inevitable announced that the  Mozilla XULRunner based music player, Songbird, will no longer be supported in Linux. This decision has been blamed on the lack of developers and their inability to continue maintaining Songbird in Linux at the same level as that in Windows and Mac OS X. An active Songbird developer has already forked the Songbird project and named it Nightingale. You can read more about it here.

  • Firefox in Ubuntu 10.04 is Going To Use Google Search

Canonicals retracted their earlier decision to use Yahoo! as the default search in Firefox that comes with Ubuntu 10.04. Firefox in Ubuntu 10.04 will now use Google as the default search. You can read more here.

Tips & Features

  • Install The Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Bisigi Themes In Karmic

There are a lot of people still using Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic and they might want to use the updated Bisigi themes but that’s not easy – the new PPA is only for Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid and also Karmic doesn’t have the latest Murrine engine so the themes won’t work – but there is a way to do it. Read more about it at  WebUpd8.

  • Installation and Getting Started with Firebug

Firebug is a free, open source tool that is available as a Mozilla Firefox extension, and allows debugging, editing, and monitoring of any website’s CSS, HTML, DOM, and JavaScript. Read more at PACKT.

No More Linux Support For Songbird

Mozilla Songbird

In a surprising turnaround,   Songbird developers Pioneers of The Inevitable (POTI Inc.) announced on their blog that they will no longer be supporting Songbird on Linux platforms. The developers cite their intent to support an increasing number of devices and a focus on narrow set of priorities meant that they would no longer be able to deliver Songbird as an outstanding product on Linux. This, the developers say,   would not be the right thing to do.

As posted on their blog,

Some of you have noticed that the Linux version has fallen behind, leading to some heated, but healthy debate internally about how to prioritize the development hopper. After careful consideration, we’ve come to the painful conclusion that we should discontinue support for the Linux version of Songbird. Some of you may wonder how a company with deep roots in Open Source could drop Linux and we want you to know it isn’t without heartache.
 We have a small engineering team here at Songbird, and, more than ever, must stay very focused on a narrow set of priorities.

The developers state that they will continue to run the build bots and host the Linux builds on the developer wiki. However this seems like a pointless exercise, especially considering that the Linux version will not be tested and is unlikely to pick up any new features.

Songbird is an open source Media Jukebox and media-oriented Web Browser built on Mozilla’s XULRunner framework with an extensively skinnable interface using what Songbird calls as “Feathers” and features add-on support to change the functionality.

I recently started using Songbird on Linux, and found it to be pretty decent. Will you miss Songbird ? Do drop a comment and let us know.