OneDrive Updates: 10GB Files, Dropbox-like Sharing, More

OneDrive, Microsoft’s cloud storage service, is getting better thanks to some top requested features being added to the service and its sync apps. In an announcement on the OneDrive Blog on September 10, Microsoft announced the following updates:

Large Files Support

Until now, OneDrive supported files up to 2GB in size but now customers can store files up to 10GB in size. This can be done through the desktop sync clients, mobile apps as well as from the web app. There are not too many “normal” uses where files would be more than 2GB in size, but some examples could be if you have digital downloads of HD movies or digitally downloaded software or Outlook PST files as examples.

Sharing directly from Windows Explorer

Dropbox has long had the ability to share a file stored in Dropbox from the computer directly, all reflecting correctly back to Dropbox service as a shared file. With OneDrive, until now, you would need to share it from OneDrive.com, unless you simply attach the file from the PC in which case it is not the same use case.

With the latest update, when you right-click on a file in Windows 7 and Windows 8, you get one more option which is to “Share a OneDrive link” which will create a link to the file and copy it to the clipboard. Once the link is created, it will be registered on OneDrive.com’s file properties as a shared file with the link. Curiously, Windows 8.1 and Mac updates are not ready yet, but will be coming soon.

OneDrive Share Link from Windows Explorer
OneDrive Share Link from Windows Explorer

Upload folders from OneDrive.com

With this update, OneDrive.com now supports uploading folders from the web app instead of just files. This includes dragging and dropping an entire folder in the web app to automatically upload it to OneDrive.

OneDrive: Upload folders
OneDrive: Upload folders

Faster syncing

Through some parallelization, Microsoft claims file sync (upload and download) improved threefold in their internal testing. Any improvement is welcome, so this is good news for those relying heavily on desktop sync clients.

As usual, these are good improvements and additions to an already excellent service. Do you have files more than 2GB which you could not sync until now? What were those files? Let us know in the comments below.

Facebook Introduces Sweeping Sharing and Privacy Changes

It seems like we hear horror stories about Facebook every day. There are writers who spend all their time at Techie Buzz warning you about Facebook scams. Joel just did a great write up on how to not get hacked on the worlds largest social network. Now, it looks like Facebook is ready to help you control your sharing and privacy setting.

Announced today on their official blog, Facebook is introducing a slew of changes to their privacy and sharing settings. These are some seriously good changes for Facebook, which hasn’t always been known for giving users control over their sharing. There are a large number of smaller changes, but they can be broken down into two big categories. Let’s take a look at each one.

Tagging Changes

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The first tagging related change is the ability to control when tagged photos appear on your profile. In the past, when someone tagged you in a photo, it would appear on your profile automatically. That lead to many spam tags appearing on profiles, and that was a huge problem for users. Now, you can choose to approve or reject each tagged photo posting individually, giving you more control over what appears on your Facbook profile.

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The next major tagging change is an old feature brought back. In the old days of Facebook, you had the ability to approve or reject tags people added to your photos or posts. Facebook has brought that back for users, which is good news. Now random people tagging your photos without your knowledge won’t be a big deal anymore.

The next tagging change revolves around the tagging of non-friends and locations. Previously, Facebook only allowed you to tag people you are friends with in your posts. That meant that if you were with someone who you weren’t friends with, you couldn’t tag them. Now, you can, with their approval.

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In addition to that, you can now tag locations without checking into them, which makes locations much more useful. Interestingly enough, this change means that Facebook is now phasing out the mobile-only version of Places. That means that all settings associated with that will be removed, and will need to be replaced in the new location settings.

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The final tagging change revolves around the removal of tags and content on Facebook. In the past, the process of untagging and removing of content was unclear for many users. Now, Facebook will prompt you for a reason, which will allow you to take one of a set of actions against a piece on content. This marks a new phase for controlling your persona via Facebook, giving you the ability to request the takedown of a photo or even block a user based on a tag.

Sharing Changes

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The next big set of changes from Facebook revolves around sharing controls. Many of us (myself included) are enthralled by Google’s sharing system on Google+. Facebook now has something very similar with its Inline Sharing Controls. When you make a post on Facebook going forward, you will have the ability to select who gets to see it. Options include Public, Friends, and Custom, and will grow to include Facebook Lists in the near future.

In the past, once a post was posted you could not change the sharing settings. Now, you are given the option to change those settings after you hit ‘Post.’ This will allow you to stop that secret message for your best friends going out to everyone on the internet.

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The last change Facebook announced is a change in the way you handle your profile visibility. In the past, if you wanted to see what your profile looked like to the public, it was hard to do. Now, you will have a button on your Facebook profile to access these previews. This button is labeled ‘View Profile As…’, and will do just what I described.

Facebook: Now More Privacy Friendly

There you have it. Facebook is now working very hard to help users get more control over their content. These changes are, together, the most sweeping sharing and privacy changes Facebook has ever released. These new features will be released to all users over the next few days, starting today. When you receive them, you will get a walkthrough to see all the new changes.

What do you think of Facebook’s changes? Are you happy to see this kind of user privacy become a priority at Facebook? Is there a change you were hoping to see sometime soon? Let us know what you think in comment section below.

Save Word Documents to Windows Live Skydrive

SkydriveI would love to have a nickel for every time the word “cloud” is used in some marketing piece these days. Are your marketing numbers down? No fear, just stick the words “cloud-hosted” in front of your product, and watch your numbers soar! For a lot of people, “the cloud” is just some mystery term that makes no sense. Let me put it to you in the simplest terms. If you take data from your computer and store it on another computer outside of your location, via the internet, you’re using “the cloud”. Why is it a “cloud”? Mostly, because you really have no idea of the physical location of the computer storing your information, or of the physical path it takes to get there. Today, I want to describe how you can save Word 2010 documents directly to “the cloud” using Windows Live SkyDrive.

Windows Live SkyDrive is a service of Microsoft. It provides 25GB of free online storage. Two of the greatest features it has are document sharing between yourself and  other Windows Live users, and in-browser editing of the documents that you store there. Let’s open a Word document and see how this is done.

In the picture below, you will see a Word document with a grocery list on it. Let’s say that you and your spouse would both like to be able to access and edit this document remotely. An easy way to do this is to use a shared folder in SkyDrive. To begin the process, you click the “File” tab on the ribbon toolbar in Word.

Word Document

 

Under the “File” tab, there is the option called “Save & Send”. Look at the picture below to see what this looks like. If you click this option, you will see a sub-menu with an option labeled “Save to Web”. Finally, clicking that option will take you to a sign in box.

Save & Send

You will need a Windows Live account to use this feature. If you are a Hotmail user, then you already have one. Just use your Hotmail account ID.

Windows Live LoginOnce you are logged in, you will see a list of folders available on your SkyDrive. In the picture below, you will see a folder highlighted under the heading of “Shared Folders”. Selecting this folder will make this file accessible to all the people with whom you have shared this folder.

Skydrive Folders

Now that you have selected the appropriate folder, click the “Save As” button at the bottom of the dialog box. You will see a window pop up similar to the one pictured below. Give the document a name and click the “Save” button to finish the job.

Save As Box

The Word document is now saved in “the cloud”. You can access the document by logging on to http://skydrive.live.com from any computer. When you do, you will see your SkyDrive folders listed.

Skydrive Window

Open the folder that contains your Word document, and you can view, as well as edit, the document right there in your browser. Below, you can see a picture of what the Word document looks like in the browser, as well as the location of the edit button.

Word in Browser

Using Word with SkyDrive is a great way to collaborate with others on a document.  It is also a good safety net because it keeps files backed up in an offsite location.  Hopefully, you can think of other creative uses for this feature.  Feel free to comment on this post at the bottom of the page, and let me know your thoughts on the subject.

 

Facebook Introduces Send Button For Private Sharing

The Like button is one of the most successful button created for social sharing and has been implemented on several thousands website. Each day millions people interact with the Like button to share content on their Facebook feed.

Facebook Send Button

What if you want to share content privately with only select few people? Well, you could just email it right. However, it looks like Facebook is going to make the email button obsolete by introducing the "Send" button.

According to the Facebook Developers blog, the Send button is allows Facebook users to share content privately with a set of people either through Facebook Messaging or Facebook Groups.

The Send button is a social plugin that websites can use to let people send a link to a friend through Facebook Messages, post it to a Group, or email it to an individual. For example, if you see a Mother’s Day gift idea on 1-800-Flowers.com, you can now send a message or email to your family members to discuss. Or say you’re training for a marathon and you come across a great article about running shoes on The Huffington Post. Now you can share it with your entire running group in just one click.

The Send button adds to a growing list of Facebook social plugins which are taking the web by storm. Facebook had introduced Facebook Messaging back in November as an alternative to traditional email by providing users with an @facebook.com email address. The service is currently being gradually rolled out and it looks like this would give people a good reason to start using Facebook messaging to share content with others.

Users can start implementing the Send button on their website similarly to the like button.  You can get the code for the Facebook Send button by visiting this page.

By the way, what do you think about this move? Will you share more content privately using the Send button than you did before? Do let me know through your comments.

TeamViewer – Best Desktop Sharing App for Linux

Have you ever had to help someone with their computer over the phone or using text chat? It’s not easy. You can’t be sure that they are in the right place, doing what you want them to do. That’s why remote desktop (screen) sharing applications are so great.

These applications are called by a variety of names such as, remote access, remote support, remote desktop, screen sharing, and desktop sharing. The main idea behind them is that they allow one computer to see another computer’s screen over a network or the internet.

My wife and I have many friends and relatives that come to us for PC help and advice. We’ve used a number of desktop sharing apps over the years and discovered that TeamViewer is one of the best, and it’s free!

Since I’ve been spending a lot of time using Linux lately, I was happy to find that TeamViewer is also available for Linux, as well as Windows, Mac and Smartphones. It’s almost as good as being there, because I can control the remote computer as if I were sitting directly in front of it. When I need to, I can change the direction to show my PC’s screen to the other person. It even makes it easy to share files with the person on the other end.

This image below shows how simple it is to set up. (click image to enlarge it)

Join.me – The Easiest Screen Sharing Online

Screen sharing lets you show someone your computer screen across the internet. Usually, you can even let a viewer take over the mouse and keyboard. I use screen sharing at work to help my co-workers with computer problems, and sometimes, even I get help. Often, people use screen sharing applications to give business presentations online.

Previously, my favorite screen sharing service was TeamViewer. It’s a free service, and it even includes voice and video chat. Now I am starting to use a different service, called Join.me.

Join.me is probably the simplest screen presentation service I’ve used. All of the these services require an installation of software on your machine. Usually, both the broadcaster (host) and the viewer (client) need to install something. Join.me breaks out of the crowd by not requiring the viewers to install any software. All they need is a modern web browser with Adobe Flash.

Here’s how it works …

1. Go to Join.me

2. If you wish to share your computer screen, click on the sharearrow.

joinme-share

3. This will start a download of the server software. (Windows and Mac)

Once you have it installed and running, you’ll see the Join.me floating toolbar at the top of your screen.

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4. Click once in the address bar and you’ll be able to copy or send the sharing address.

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5. The person you wish to share with, can either click the link you’ve sent them, or type the 9 digit number in the Joinbox at the Join.me website.

joinme-join

6. As soon as they join, you are sharing your screen. That’s when you can start using your floating Join.me toolbar to control the session. As far as I know you can invite any number of people to your screen sharing session.

The phone icon actually lets you call them on a conference line. I haven’t tried that feature because I usually call the person on my phone or use Google Voice to chat with them.

This service and it’s operation is best explained by watching this video.

Join.me quick preview and tutorial from Andy Traub on Vimeo.

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Techie Buzz Verdict:

Join.me is a great service, it’s easy to use and it’s free. What more do you want? Actually, I would like to have video chat, but this service is still a winner for the viewers. They don’t need to install any software to see your presentations.


Share Cheat Sheets and Programming Stuff With QuicklyCode

With the titanic amount of information on the web, it gets harder and harder to organize content so it is easily available without complex searching. Well, if you are a web developer or programmer, you don’t need to worry about that as QuicklyCode is a great resource to find all you need.

It is a community of programmers and developers to share cheat sheets, code snippets, widgets, tutorials, info graphics and even apps. Everything is categorized and can be browsed through using the tag cloud or searched using a keyword. The categories include programming languages like Fortran, C++, Python, design tools like GIMP, Photoshop, Illustrator and even simple platforms like WordPress, Facebook and Firefox.

You can download the information, rate it to provide feedback as well as read and post comments. Each cheat sheet includes information like author’s name, date of upload and a link to author’s website. If you think you have worked some info that can help other people, feel free to upload it to QuicklyCode. The collection is not huge right now but the more people start using it, the more beneficial it would get. Think about how much time it can save you if you can borrow code for something specific instead of spending hours writing  and debugging it.

Call Drop.io and Create a Public Voicemail as MP3

phone-msg-2-mp3 There are many file sharing services out there. Many offer simple free file hosting, however, I don’t know of any that offer as many ways to share files and share ideas as the Drop.io service. I recently received a letter from them that mentioned a cool feature I wasn’t aware of. Here’s the letter:

Few know this, but it’s easy (not to mention useful) to record a voicemail inside a drop.

Here’s how:
1. Start a ‘drop’ with 1-click
2. Inside the drop, hit the button that says ‘create a free number’
3. Call that number and leave a voice message
… that’s it! The message will automatically become an mp3.

Reporters use this function as an easy way to record interviews on-the-ground and podcasters use it for their shows. We like to leave personal greetings on drops filled with photos for our friends and family.

Check out the voicemail we left for you – and leave us a message in return.
http://drop.io/maynewsletter

I can think of several other ways to use a public (or private) online voice mail. There are many other useful Drop.io features you might want to check out. Here’s short video about them:

Here are a few of our previous posts about the Drop.io site and services:

1. Drop.io Extension For Google Chrome

2. Drop.io | A File Sharing Program, which is more than just RapidShare

3. Send 100MB Attachments With Yahoo Mail

4. Drop.io, A Service To Privately Share Your Files

5. Drop.io Extension For Google Chrome

Be sure to let us know if you have some new ideas how to use this or any other file sharing service.

15 Awesome Tools To Share Images On Twitter

With millions of tweets everyday, Twitter is one of the most popular social network on the web. People use it to share everything including their media. Here, we bring to you 15 great tools to share your photos/images/pictures on Twitter without any hassle:

1. Twitter2Press: A sleek WordPress plugin to share your images on Twitter. Your images are hosted on your WordPress blog and are hence advertisement free.

2. TwitterGram: Send your Flickr photos to Twitter automatically. Just provide your Flickr username and Twitter credentials, and TwitterGram will scan your Flickr feeds every 10 minutes and post new photos to your Twitter account.

3. TwitPic: One of the most popular image sharing tools for Twitter. Just upload an image from your computer or phone and easily post it to Twitter.

4. PictTweet: Upload hand written pictures on Twitter using your iPhone/iPod Touch.

5. Imj.tw: Sign in with your Twitter or Facebook account to share pictures securely on Twitter. You can also edit titles, descriptions and other options. Maximum allowed size is 10 MB per image.

6. TwitPaint: Feeling creative? Paint a graffiti and share it on Twitter. You can also browse and edit graffiti created by other users.

7. TweetPhoto: Share your photos on Twitter and Facebook. Log back in any time to see the images you have shared.

8. FlickToTwitt: Announce on Twitter as soon as you post an image on Flickr. A very simple yet useful tool to sync your Flickr and Twitter account.

9. SnapShack: A simple photo sharing tool for Twitter that lets you resize pictures before sharing.

10. Pikter: Share your photos on Twitter via email or MMS. Just send your photos to Pikter and they will automatically be posted to your Twitter account.

11. PixaVid: A very simple and to-the-point tool that lets you share images on Twitter.

12. Rosa.ly: Found an interesting image on the web? Share it on Twitter using this great Firefox extension. Also lets you save and organize images.

13. Twio.cz: Upload pictures on Twitter via web or email. Twio also lets you comment on other photos. Maximum allowed size is 3 MB per image.

14. Tvider: Share your pictures, audio and video on Twitter. Record from your webcam or upload from your computer. Tvider also has mobile apps for iPhone, Symbian and BlackBerry.

15. TwitBooth: Take pictures with your webcam and share on Twitter. A no-hassle tool.