Free iTunes Card Codes Facebook Scam

There seems to be a new scam message spreading on Facebook, and this time it is the iTunes users who have been targeted. The new scam message spreading on Facebook promises users with free iTunes card codes, which they can redeem it after completion of certain steps. However, this is a fake promotion, and there is no such iTunes card codes given away for free.

The message is spreading as follows:

Get your free iTunes card pin codes here for free! Supplies are limited so get yours before we run out! [Link]

Free iTunes Codes Facebook

Clicking the message link will take you to a bogus web page, where you are provided with instructions on how to get “download” an iTunes gift card code. In the first step, you are asked to share the page on Facebook with friends. In the second step, you are asked to share the same page on any other social media tools listed on the page. Finally, you are asked to post an update on your Facebook wall stating that you have received a free card code for iTunes.

None of the above steps will get you a free iTunes gift code. You are only spamming your friends news feed by spreading this false message. It is recommended that you DO NOT click on the message link, or share it with your friends.

A similar scam that we reported was the Get Costco Gift Card for FREE! (Limited time only). Make sure you avoid such scam messages. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

I suggest you to remove the scam from your news feed by clicking on the “X” mark on the top-right corner of the post. Alternatively you can report the scam to the Facebook Security team.

Please note that scams like this use multiple domain and different web pages. You may see variations in the landing pages, but they are all the same.

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Facebook Profile Viewer – Who Viewed Your Profile Scam

Although the social media giant Facebook has taken measures to eradicate spam and hoax messages from its site, spam messages are continuing to galore as may users are falling for tricks set by hackers and spammers in an aim to steal user information.

Today, I noticed yet another scam message spreading across Facebook. The new scam tricks users into installing a rogue Facebook application, promising them to show the list of users who viewed their profile.

Although this particular scam has been reported earlier a several times, with users being warned not to click on such messages, yet users continue clicking it and install the Facebook app. The new variant is very much similar to previous scam messages, and attempts to steal personal information from tricked Facebook users.

Did you know? 14 million Facebook Accounts are used to spread spam messages.

The new scam is spreading with the title Facebook Profile Viewer containing the following messages:

Yes! I can’t believe that you can see who is viewing your profile! I just saw my top profile viewers and I am SHOCKED from who are viewing my profile! You can also see WHO VIEWED YOUR PROFILE [link]

WOW I just saw my top 10 profile VIEWERS. You can now see who’s been stalking at your profile for real! You can easily check who’s spying on you at [link]

My total profile views today:

Male Viewers: 31
Female Viewers: 64
See your total views and who is viewing you here: [link]

Facebook Profile Viewer Scam

Clicking the scam will take you to the Facebook app installation page, where you are asked to grant permissions to the rogue app to post updates on your behalf and also access your information on Facebook. Providing access will put your Facebook account at high risk as scammers might try to hack it and steal all your information.

The app looks like just any other Facebook app and will ask for your permissions before taking you to a page where they will ask you to complete a survey before you can see “Who’s viewing your Facebook Profile”. However, once you complete the survey it will only make money for the scammers and not show you the information you are looking for.

Here is a list of previously reported similar scam messages spreading on Facebook:

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Last week, Facebook announced the launch of [email protected], an email address available to the public to report phishing attempts against Facebook.

With over 955 million monthly active users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with thelatest scams spreading on Facebook.

Get Free SimCity Diamond (900 per account) Facebook Scam

A new scam message is caught spreading on the social networking giant Facebook, where users are tricked into clicking a bogus link in order to win free SimCity Diamonds.

The new scam message is spreading with the following message and title:

Why pay for SimCity Diamond when you can get it for free? Now claim your 900 SimCity Diamond for free! A Playfish Inc. limited time promotion only.

Hey friends, visit the site below to get 900 SimCity Diamond for Free! Hurry up and claim yours before the giveaway is over! [link]

Free SimCity Diamond Scam

On the clicking the title link, users will be taken to a .tk bogus web site, where you will be asked to “like” and “share” the same message with your friends on Facebook in order to claim the free diamonds. However, doing so will only spam your friends’ news feed, and will not fetch you any SimCity Diamonds.

After you have liked and shared the post, you will be redirected to another bogus site where you will be asked for your contact information, such as your email id, phone number, and address. The scammers misuse the entered details by selling them to third-party services.

Free SimCity Diamond Scam

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Facebook currently has over 955 million users, and the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scam messages. Although it is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook, we have provided some tips on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

Get Free $500 Coles Voucher Facebook Scam

A new scam message has surfaced the social networking giant Facebook, claiming to offer free $500 Coles gift voucher. The message is a typical survey scam, which asks for your personal and contact information in order to claim the “gift.”

The scam is spreading on Facebook with the following message –

“Claim your free $500 Coles voucher. Only a few left.”

Free $500 Coles Voucher Facebook Scam

Another viariant of this message is: “Coles is offering free $500 vouchers tor users who click a link in the post.”

This is a bogus message, and there is no such official Coles promotion running. Clicking the link provided in the message will take you to a page where you are asked to “like” and “share” the message with your friends. You are then redirected to an online survey page, where you will be asked to enter your contact information such as your email id and mobile phone number.

Entering the details will yield you nothing. The scammers are misusing the details entered by selling them to third-party services. As you can from the above screen shot, the user had fallen for the scam trick, and entered her mobile details. The scammers are now bombarding her with calls and text messages.

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Also, as a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Facebook currently has over 950 million users visiting per month, and the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scam messages. Although it is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook, we have provided some tips on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

“Share” and Facebook Will Donate $1 to Starving Kids – Facebook Hoax

Yet another hoax message is reportedly spreading on Facebook, and this time it is about Facebook donating money for “sharing” a picture of an unhealthy child. This isn’t the first time we’re seeing such a message spreading on Facebook. This appears to be similar to one of the hoax messages that was reported last month – Facebook to Donate 50 Cents for Every “Like.”

The hoax message is spreading with the following message and a picture of a child –

I am not asking you to click “like” but i am asking you to please click share.

For every share of this pic Facebook will donate 1$ to the starving kids all over…

Facebook to Donate Starving Kinds - Hoax

The message claims that Facebook will be donating $1 in order to help starving children every time the picture is shared on the network. However, this is not true, and there is no such donation done by Facebook.

People generally create such messages in order to generate “likes” and “shares” on Facebook. Doing this wouldn’t benefit them in any way, however, they are motivated by the desire to accumulate large numbers of likes and shares on Facebook.

It’s true that sharing such messages creates an awareness, however, “liking” or “sharing” will not help this or any other child in any way. It is always advised that users verify such information before spreading it across to their friends. A quick search on Google will help you find out whether the message is a fake or not.

We at Techie Buzz always try to keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. You can follow our dedicated Facebook page where we report all spreading scams – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

Leaked Images of Sunny Leone from Jism 2 – Facebook Scam

A new scam message has been doing the rounds on the social media network Facebook, enticing users to click on the link in order to view leaked images of Canadian actress Sunny Leone. We have seen similar such scam messages spreading the past including, Nicki Minaj Gets Caught on Tape, and Kim Kardashian Exposed.

The Sunny Leone leaked images scam is spreading with the following title with the same description, along with the link to a rogue Facebook application:

Sunny Leone Leaked Jism 2 Nude Undressing Scene Ex : [link]

Sunny Leone Leaked Jism 2 Nude Images - Facebook Scam

Clicking the link provided in the scam message will take you to a Facebook app page, where you will be asked to authorize the app to post updates on your behalf and also have access to your basic personal information, including your email id.

It is highly not recommended that you authorize app like this. Scammers generally misuse the information they have obtained by either trying to hack your Facebook account, or sell it to third-party organizations, who in turn will spam your inbox.

You will then be redirected to a Blogspot site, which is designed to look like a Facebook page. You will notice a fake video player, and clicking the play button will like-jack your Facebook account. You are also presented with a set of online surveys.

Fake Facebook Page

Whatsoever you do, there are no leaked pictures shown to you. The creators of the message are simply trying to gather as much information as possible from your Facebook account and misuse them to the highest extent.

In case you have already fallen for this trap, then I recommend you to deauthorize the rogue app from your Facebook account. To do so, go to your Facebook Account Settings. From the menu on the left, select “Apps.”

Identify the app that you want to remove, and click on the “x” mark. This will open a pop-up window where you will be asked to confirm whether you want to remove the app or not. Before you click on “Remove” button, make sure you have checked the “Delete all app activity” option. Once done, the app will no more be associated with your Facebook account.

Remove Facebook App

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages  on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

Facebook to Donate 50 Cents for Every “Like” – Hoax

There is a new hoax message that is spreading across Facebook, and it isn’t any different from the other hoax and spam messages. The new hoax message claims that Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has apparently “agreed” to donate 50 cents for every “like” the photo gets, eventually helping to raise funds for abused wife “Isabella.” However, none of it is true.

Here’s the message that is spreading along with the photo a link to YouTube video –

Facebook to Donate 50 cents to Isabella

Her name is isabella, she was abused at home by her husband every single day because she didn’t cook dinner for him, her doctor mark grant said she has a broken bone and ankle and they will need $200,000 by 19th June for her operation, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerburg has agreed to donate 50 cents for every like this photo gets, one like wont hurt, so please like if you have a heart.. do not ignore this. Men should NOT abuse their wife.

Watch the PROOF of the video on YouTube of her husband abusing her at home, has been sentenced for 20 years now — > [link]

It’s funny to see that the creator of this hoax message couldn’t even spell Mark Zuckerberg’s name correctly.

The link to the YouTube video is nothing related to a husband accusing his wife or anything of that sort, but instead leads to a video in which two lunatic girls are making an attempt to be funny. Perhaps the primary motive behind this hoax message is to generate Facebook “likes” and video views on YouTube.

Also, Mark Zuckerberg or Facebook does not make any such donations by getting users to “like” or “share” a photo or message. This isn’t something new as we have seen several such hoax and spam messages spreading across the social network.

It is always advised that users verify such information before spreading it across to their friends. A quick search on Google will help you find out whether the message is a fake or not.

We at Techie Buzz always try to keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. You can follow our dedicated Facebook page where we report all spreading scams – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

CNBC.Com Spoof Twitter Spam on The Rise

Of late, Twitter users are being  bombarded with tons of direct messages which contain links to a spoof CNBC website that shows you how to make tons of money while sitting at home. While these types of spam messages are not new and have been circulated in the past (See: Want to Start a Real Internet Biz This Year?), the number of DMs these days are hitting the roof.

CNBC.com Twitter DM Spam

The spam is being circulating in various forms and includes messages (accompanied with a spoof CNBC.com link) like:

Hey, Be your own boss man!

Hey, Why be bitched around, turn the tables on em!

Hey, Change your life, TODAY!

Hey, Why bother doing somebody elses dirty work?

Hey, This is how you make REAL money!

Though these spam messages are not as bad as the bad rumors about you and terrible things about you phishing attacks, they are annoying as hell. The links are created by some work-from-home scammers who want to rip you off and make money themselves.

The link in the message usually takes you to a website which looks very similar to CNBC.com and contain fictitious headlines like “New York Mom Earns $6,795/Month Part-Time”. The website also goes on to detail their online business in the rest of the content and how they are making tons of money accompanied with some fake screenshots of Google AdSense and other money-making websites.

While it is easy to fall prey to because the the website is designed to look like CNBC (and many times other popular news outlets), as a user, you should always look at the URL to see what the domain is.  For example, CNBC.com should always end in CNBC.com followed by any additional parameters and not CNBC.com-scammerdomain.info as in this case.

It is apparent that the users themselves are not sending these messages. So, it might be that users’ accounts are being compromised using other phishing attacks or Twitter apps. As a precaution, change your Twitter password immediately if such messages were sent from your account and also revoke app permissions on Twitter.

Work from Home scams have been going around for years now, but the barrage of spam hitting both Twitter and Facebook is very high. It is high time that both these social networking websites up their ante and start protecting their users from spammers and scammers.

 

A Giant Snake Swallows Up a Zookeeper Facebook Scam

A new scam message is reportedly been spreading on Facebook, where users are enticed to click on a link which promises to show them a video of a snake eating a man. Although the message has been flagged as a scam, many users on Facebook are still clicking on the scam link, which then automatically “likes” and “shares” it on their Facebook Timeline.

The scam message is spreading with the following title and message –

Title: [Video] Snake Eats Man

Message: CAUGHT ON TAPE- A Giant Snake Swallows Up A Zookeeper in Front of Hundreds of People!

Here’s a screen shot of the above spreading message –

Snake Eats Man - Facebook Scam

Clicking the message link will take the user to a page that is designed to look very similar to a Facebook Page. The page contains a fake YouTube video player, and clicking on the “play” button, your Facebook account will be like-jacked.

Likejacking is a malicious technique of tricking users of a website into posting a Facebook status update for a site they did not intentionally mean to “like”.

Snake Eats Man - Facebook Video Scam

Once the message has been posted on your Facebook Timeline, you will be redirected to another page where you will be presented with a set of online surveys. The scammer indicates that after you have completed the surveys, you can watch the video. However, there is no such video shown.

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Also, as a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

OMG Its Horrible my Ex is Still Checking My Profile – Facebook Spam

Another profile views related scam is underway on where users are spreading messages saying that their significant-ex have been viewing their profile and it is horrible.

Facebook Who's Viewed Me App

This scam is very similar to earlier profile scams like the Profile watcher rogue app and several other scams related to profile views including this, this, this, this and this. The new spam is spreading with a different message:

Omg its horrible.My ex is still checking my profile.
its amaging (sic). now I can see profile visitors & My photo viewers
My total Pr0file views : 1468
Girls Views :597
Boys Views : 871
Check yours – [link redacted]

While most of the related Facebook spam have been ill conceived, this one is spreading through an app which has a well designed landing page. The app use false description and fan base to entice the users to use the app. It also has a message saying:

This is amazing

Now you can see who is viewing your profile and find out how many profiles views you got. Just use our application and press button below and then Allow to analyze your Facebook profile!.

Like I have already said in the past, Facebook does not allow apps information about who viewed your profile and the number of times your profile was accessed. Apps like this just use the gullibility of users to entice them and then spam their friends and family. Once you allow access to the app, it will post the status update as shown above and spread the spam among your friends.

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Also, as a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.