Tag Archives: Scams

Leaked Images of Sunny Leone from Jism 2 – Facebook Scam

A new scam message has been doing the rounds on the social media network Facebook, enticing users to click on the link in order to view leaked images of Canadian actress Sunny Leone. We have seen similar such scam messages spreading the past including, Nicki Minaj Gets Caught on Tape, and Kim Kardashian Exposed.

The Sunny Leone leaked images scam is spreading with the following title with the same description, along with the link to a rogue Facebook application:

Sunny Leone Leaked Jism 2 Nude Undressing Scene Ex : [link]

Sunny Leone Leaked Jism 2 Nude Images - Facebook Scam

Clicking the link provided in the scam message will take you to a Facebook app page, where you will be asked to authorize the app to post updates on your behalf and also have access to your basic personal information, including your email id.

It is highly not recommended that you authorize app like this. Scammers generally misuse the information they have obtained by either trying to hack your Facebook account, or sell it to third-party organizations, who in turn will spam your inbox.

You will then be redirected to a Blogspot site, which is designed to look like a Facebook page. You will notice a fake video player, and clicking the play button will like-jack your Facebook account. You are also presented with a set of online surveys.

Fake Facebook Page

Whatsoever you do, there are no leaked pictures shown to you. The creators of the message are simply trying to gather as much information as possible from your Facebook account and misuse them to the highest extent.

In case you have already fallen for this trap, then I recommend you to deauthorize the rogue app from your Facebook account. To do so, go to your Facebook Account Settings. From the menu on the left, select “Apps.”

Identify the app that you want to remove, and click on the “x” mark. This will open a pop-up window where you will be asked to confirm whether you want to remove the app or not. Before you click on “Remove” button, make sure you have checked the “Delete all app activity” option. Once done, the app will no more be associated with your Facebook account.

Remove Facebook App

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages  on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

Facebook to Donate 50 Cents for Every “Like” – Hoax

There is a new hoax message that is spreading across Facebook, and it isn’t any different from the other hoax and spam messages. The new hoax message claims that Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has apparently “agreed” to donate 50 cents for every “like” the photo gets, eventually helping to raise funds for abused wife “Isabella.” However, none of it is true.

Here’s the message that is spreading along with the photo a link to YouTube video –

Facebook to Donate 50 cents to Isabella

Her name is isabella, she was abused at home by her husband every single day because she didn’t cook dinner for him, her doctor mark grant said she has a broken bone and ankle and they will need $200,000 by 19th June for her operation, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerburg has agreed to donate 50 cents for every like this photo gets, one like wont hurt, so please like if you have a heart.. do not ignore this. Men should NOT abuse their wife.

Watch the PROOF of the video on YouTube of her husband abusing her at home, has been sentenced for 20 years now — > [link]

It’s funny to see that the creator of this hoax message couldn’t even spell Mark Zuckerberg’s name correctly.

The link to the YouTube video is nothing related to a husband accusing his wife or anything of that sort, but instead leads to a video in which two lunatic girls are making an attempt to be funny. Perhaps the primary motive behind this hoax message is to generate Facebook “likes” and video views on YouTube.

Also, Mark Zuckerberg or Facebook does not make any such donations by getting users to “like” or “share” a photo or message. This isn’t something new as we have seen several such hoax and spam messages spreading across the social network.

It is always advised that users verify such information before spreading it across to their friends. A quick search on Google will help you find out whether the message is a fake or not.

We at Techie Buzz always try to keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. You can follow our dedicated Facebook page where we report all spreading scams – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

CNBC.Com Spoof Twitter Spam on The Rise

Of late, Twitter users are being  bombarded with tons of direct messages which contain links to a spoof CNBC website that shows you how to make tons of money while sitting at home. While these types of spam messages are not new and have been circulated in the past (See: Want to Start a Real Internet Biz This Year?), the number of DMs these days are hitting the roof.

CNBC.com Twitter DM Spam

The spam is being circulating in various forms and includes messages (accompanied with a spoof CNBC.com link) like:

Hey, Be your own boss man!

Hey, Why be bitched around, turn the tables on em!

Hey, Change your life, TODAY!

Hey, Why bother doing somebody elses dirty work?

Hey, This is how you make REAL money!

Though these spam messages are not as bad as the bad rumors about you and terrible things about you phishing attacks, they are annoying as hell. The links are created by some work-from-home scammers who want to rip you off and make money themselves.

The link in the message usually takes you to a website which looks very similar to CNBC.com and contain fictitious headlines like “New York Mom Earns $6,795/Month Part-Time”. The website also goes on to detail their online business in the rest of the content and how they are making tons of money accompanied with some fake screenshots of Google AdSense and other money-making websites.

While it is easy to fall prey to because the the website is designed to look like CNBC (and many times other popular news outlets), as a user, you should always look at the URL to see what the domain is.  For example, CNBC.com should always end in CNBC.com followed by any additional parameters and not CNBC.com-scammerdomain.info as in this case.

It is apparent that the users themselves are not sending these messages. So, it might be that users’ accounts are being compromised using other phishing attacks or Twitter apps. As a precaution, change your Twitter password immediately if such messages were sent from your account and also revoke app permissions on Twitter.

Work from Home scams have been going around for years now, but the barrage of spam hitting both Twitter and Facebook is very high. It is high time that both these social networking websites up their ante and start protecting their users from spammers and scammers.

 

A Giant Snake Swallows Up a Zookeeper Facebook Scam

A new scam message is reportedly been spreading on Facebook, where users are enticed to click on a link which promises to show them a video of a snake eating a man. Although the message has been flagged as a scam, many users on Facebook are still clicking on the scam link, which then automatically “likes” and “shares” it on their Facebook Timeline.

The scam message is spreading with the following title and message –

Title: [Video] Snake Eats Man

Message: CAUGHT ON TAPE- A Giant Snake Swallows Up A Zookeeper in Front of Hundreds of People!

Here’s a screen shot of the above spreading message –

Snake Eats Man - Facebook Scam

Clicking the message link will take the user to a page that is designed to look very similar to a Facebook Page. The page contains a fake YouTube video player, and clicking on the “play” button, your Facebook account will be like-jacked.

Likejacking is a malicious technique of tricking users of a website into posting a Facebook status update for a site they did not intentionally mean to “like”.

Snake Eats Man - Facebook Video Scam

Once the message has been posted on your Facebook Timeline, you will be redirected to another page where you will be presented with a set of online surveys. The scammer indicates that after you have completed the surveys, you can watch the video. However, there is no such video shown.

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Also, as a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

OMG Its Horrible my Ex is Still Checking My Profile – Facebook Spam

Another profile views related scam is underway on where users are spreading messages saying that their significant-ex have been viewing their profile and it is horrible.

Facebook Who's Viewed Me App

This scam is very similar to earlier profile scams like the Profile watcher rogue app and several other scams related to profile views including this, this, this, this and this. The new spam is spreading with a different message:

Omg its horrible.My ex is still checking my profile.
its amaging (sic). now I can see profile visitors & My photo viewers
My total Pr0file views : 1468
Girls Views :597
Boys Views : 871
Check yours – [link redacted]

While most of the related Facebook spam have been ill conceived, this one is spreading through an app which has a well designed landing page. The app use false description and fan base to entice the users to use the app. It also has a message saying:

This is amazing

Now you can see who is viewing your profile and find out how many profiles views you got. Just use our application and press button below and then Allow to analyze your Facebook profile!.

Like I have already said in the past, Facebook does not allow apps information about who viewed your profile and the number of times your profile was accessed. Apps like this just use the gullibility of users to entice them and then spam their friends and family. Once you allow access to the app, it will post the status update as shown above and spread the spam among your friends.

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Also, as a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

Hey This User is Posting Very Bad Rumors About You – Twitter Phishing

Of Late,  has been a target of lot of spam messages, but the most recent ones are pretty dangerous phishing attacks and can allow a spammer to access your Twitter username and password. Most recently Twitter phishing attacks have spread through DM messages like “You Seen What This Person is Saying About You Terrible Things” and “Somebody is Saying Real Bad Rumors About You“.

The new phishing attack is spreading on Twitter through messages like:

Hey this user is posting very bad rumors about you…

Hi someone is posting horrible rumors about you…

The messages above are accompanied with a link which takes you to a phishing website that looks very similar to Twitter. The websites’ URL is also made to look very similar to that of Twitter.

twitter_phishing_dm_attack

Once you are on the website, you will be asked to sign in to your Twitter account because your session has timed out. If you enter your username and password into the phishing page, the scammers will redirect you to Twitter and ask permission to install an app which will then send out the rogue message as a direct message to all your followers and continue spreading the phishing attack.

Please DO NOT enter you username and password since the scammers will then gain access to your account username and password. If you already have done so, make sure to change your Twitter password IMMEDIATELY. Also follow our guide to remove apps from Twitter to revoke permissions to the rogue app that you granted access to.

Please do share this page with your Twitter friends so that they are aware of this phishing attack.

Two Free JetBlue Airline Tickets (Limited Time Only) Facebook Scam

In the past, we reported the free Southwest Airline Ticket message spreading on Facebook, where users were promised with two free tickets from the airlines, however, that turned out to be a fake message created by scammers. Today we noticed a similar scam that has been spreading across the social networking giant Facebook.

The new Facebook cam is spreading with the following message:

2 FREE JetBlue Airline Tickets! (limited time only)

JetBlue Airline is giving away 2 FREE Tickets to all Facebook users!

Two Free JetBlue Airline Tickets

Please beware that there are no free tickers given away by JetBlue Airways. Scammers have created this message and are taking advantage of Facebook’s 850 million user base in order to spread it. The scam in itself is not dangerous, but it might become if lot of people share them.

Clicking on the scam link message, will take you to a page that is designed to look like a Facebook Page. You are asked to post the same message on your profile and click on the “like” button in order to get two free tickets. However, once you have completed the steps, you will be redirected to another bogus page where you may be asked to download a file, which is a malware program, or take up online surveys.

Two Free JetBlue Airline Tickets

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been a main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed.

We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. Alternatively, you can follow our dedicated scams page on Facebook – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

Which Celebrity You Look Alike? Facebook Scam

There is a new scam message that is spreading like wildfire on Facebook. The new scam is a Facebook app that asks users to install it in order to check as to which celebrity the user resembles to. This is a rouge application and a survey scam, which could gather your personal information and misuse it.

The scam message is spreading with the title – “Which Celebrity you look alike?” followed by a link to the Facebook app. You will also see an image of a celebrity along with the user’s profile photo showing the similarity between the two. Well, even if there is no resemblance between the two, the app randomly shows a picture of celebrity.

Which Celebrity you look alike? Facebook Scam

Installing the app will provide access to the developer of this application to all your personal information and contact details. The application will be able to post to Facebook as you. This will allow them to spam their scam messages to all of your friends. This scam also tags your friends in the Wall Post without your knowledge.

Further ahead, after having the app installed, you will be redirected to a bogus page where you will be presented with a set of online surveys. It is highly recommended that you avoid answering these surveys as they yield you nothing.

Which Celebrity you look alike?

It also recommended that avoid installing apps that not from a genuine developer. If in case you have already installed this app, then make sure you remove the app from your Facebook account immediately.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams and spam messages. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. Alternatively, you can follow our dedicated scams page on Facebook – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

FREE Tom’s Shoes: 24 Hours Left Facebook Scam

Remember the free Facebook shoes scam and the more recent Free Tom’s Shoes scam? Well, it looks like the same Facebook scam is now spreading more rapidly using several differing messages.

Get a FREE Pair of Toms Shoes (Limited Time Only) Facebook Scam

The Facebook spam is spreading several messages including among others:

Tom’s Shoes Giveaway: Grab it NOW!. ONLY 24 HOURS LEFT: FREE Pair of Tom’s Shoes! Grab your free pair of Tom’s shoes! FREE Tom’s Shoes: 24 Hours Left. FREE Tom’s Shoes Pair: Only FEW HOURS LEFT!

The scam is similar to the earlier Free Tom’s Shoes scam where users were taken to a bogus site and asked to share the link on and also "like" the page to get a pair of Free Tom’s shoes. Doing the above does not give you any free Tom’s shoes but spreads the scam on your Facebook wall/timeline. Also, there are several websites which are being used to spread this scam with URLs that include Tom’s Shoes or something similar.

Just like those free Gift Card scams and iPad giveaway scams, spotting such scams are easy because no company would probably give away free stuff on Facebook to millions of users. If they do, it would be through their official Facebook Fan page and not through some scam website.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams and spam messages. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. Alternatively, you can follow our dedicated scams page on Facebook – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

OMG! I Cant Believe That Miley Cyrus Can Do This Facebook Spam

After a brief lull a new video scam has made its way the social networking website. The new Miley Cyrus scam is spreading similar to older scams where users are made to believe that celebrities are doing nasty things which are caught on video.

The new Facebook scam is spreading with the following message and is accompanied by a NSFW image:

OMG! I Cant Believe That Miley Cyrus Can Do This!

I cant believe MILEY Sucked it so hard! She Is Desperate!

In February and March, a lot of similar scams had made their way to Facebook which included OMG Have You Watched This Embarrassing Videos on Live TV, Hidden Camera in Selena and Justin’s Bedroom and Whitney Houston’s dead video scams. Also, Miley Cyrus has also been part of previous Facebook scams like the I Lost All Respect for Miley Cyrus After Watching This Video! and the Miley Cyrus Sick Video Scam.

omg_miley_cyrus

The current Miley Cyrus scam takes users to a webpage which looks very similar to Facebook and contains a fake video player and comments. Clicking on the play link on the video asks you to share the page on Facebook before you can start watching the video in question. However, sharing the link does not do anything and it will keep prompting you to share the video to watch it.

Even though the Miley Cyrus spam is not as deadly as other Facebook spam messages, it is definitely annoying when your friends see NSFW images on their timeline. It is always better to control your curiosity.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams and spam messages. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. Alternatively, you can follow our dedicated scams page on Facebook – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

Somebody is Saying Real Bad Rumors About You Twitter Phishing Attack

Last month users were attacked using a DM scam where users received direct messages from people they know saying "You Seen What This Person is Saying About You Terrible Things". The affected several users who went on to click on the accompanying link and then entered their Twitter username and password on the phishing website.

It looks like another similar scam is currently spreading on Twitter through direct messages. The phishing scam is similar to the earlier attacks and is spreading with the following message:

Hi. somebody is saying real bad rumors about you here ;(

The message is accompanied by a link, clicking on which will lead you to a website which spoofs the twitter interface and tells you to login using your Twitter username and password. The URL is also made to look very similar to that of Twitter.

twitter_phishing_dm_attack

The webpage in question asks you to enter your username and password and then redirects you to install an app on Twitter which in turn sends out rogue messages to all your followers.

Please DO NOT enter you username and password since the scammers will then gain access to your account username and password. If you do enter your username and password into the phishing page, the scammers will then redirect you to Twitter and ask permission to install an app which will then send out the rogue message as a direct message to all your followers and continue spreading the phishing attack.

To avoid phishing attacks, always look at the URL to see whether you are entering your password on the site itself and not some masked URL which is made to look like the original site. Additionally, you should also periodically check the apps you have given access to in your Twitter account and remove unwanted apps. Learn how to remove apps or revoke app permissions in Twitter.

Work At Home Mom Earns $6,795/Month Facebook Scam

It’s a crazy economy with jobs hard to come by. However, no job is better than that of a scammer because they are the one’s who easily make money by fooling people. A new Facebook scam is spreading which takes advantage of the current economy by posting a link with various messages on how a "Mom earns $6,795 a month from home".

Work At Home Mom Earns $6K Scam

Well, these are just some of the messages which are spreading on Facebook. There are several others which are also included with the link. The link in question is also a sham because it fools users into believing that the article is posted on the popular website CNBC.

Also Read: How to Prevent Your Facebook Account from Getting Hacked | Anatomy of a Phishing Email

The scam is spreading on with the following messages:

Work at home Mom Earns $6,795/month
Discover how this Work From Home Mom has Earned a Living during these tough economic times.

Omg!, more than 80,000 people in the U.S. get hired online every day, no wonder everyone in America are all fat everyone sits at home.

Interesting, statistics show that in 2012 internet employment rates have nearly doubled compared to last years.. I found myself a new job :D

Interesting, more than 60,000 people in the US get hired online every day, no wonder people in America are all fat everyone sits at home!

Interesting…, employment rates in the US has gone up nearly 20%.. better yet i just got hired thanks to

looks like in the next few years everyone is gonna be working from home, internet employment rates in america have DOUBLED during the past 3 years. i just got my online job today like me

The site in question does a pretty good job at spoofing the CNBC website, however, neither is the site affiliated with CNBC and nor is the article correct. The article fools users into signing up for some "Internet Payday System" which will then make them money and leave you with a little less cash.

Work From Home Mom Scam

 

Such scams are not new and there have been several instances where people have been fooled by advertisement and emails as well. It is always advisable to not believe in such systems because you will usually end up losing money. I agree the economy is not all that great but this would hardly help you out.

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

Do Not Add “Kelly Hargrove” as Your Facebook Friend – Facebook Virus Hoax

A new hoax message has emerged out on the social networking site Facebook, with users creating awareness of the message asking their friends not to accept friend requests sent by “Kelly Hargrove”, “Jason Lee”, or “Linda Smith”, since it is a virus. The message that users are sharing on the network is false and is completely not in accordance with fact or reality.

There is no such virus on Facebook, which will harm your computer by accepting a friend request from the mentioned names. The message has also been spreading on Twitter and indicates that the name itself is a virus and adding the person to your friend list will harm your computer by downloading the virus. It also states that the information “has been confirmed” and asks users to “share” the message on their Facebook Timeline and warn their friends about it.

… CRITELLI*, KELLY HARGROVE, ALSO IF SOMEBODY CALLED *KELLY HARGROVE* ADDS YOU, DON’T ACCEPT… IT IS A VIRUS. TELL EVERYBODY, BECAUSE IF SOMEBODY ON YOUR LIST ADDS THEM, YOU GET THE VIRUS TOO. **COPY AND PASTE AND PLEASE RE POST* THIS HAS BEEN CONFIRMED BY FACEBOOK AND SNOPES Raquel Critelli is in fact Kelly Hargrove’s account .. it was just confirmed …it is a hacker account.!!! Pass this on people, spread the warnings please !!!!!!!! repost to your family and friends

Do Not Add as Friend - Facebook Virus Hoax

There are several version of the message with different names. These messages are completely false and there are no such viruses named after these users. Your computer will not be infected by any virus by accepting a friend request or adding a user to your friends list. Messages like these have been spreading from the last three years and in order to make difference in the appearances of the message, spammers make subtle changes like the name and alter a few other details.

Although the message states that the information has been “confirmed”, it however does not reveal who confirmed it or on what basis the information was confirmed. This clearly shows that the message is a fake. There is no point in creating any awareness and users should avoid spreading messages like this.

Some versions of the message state that the information has been confirmed by Facebook and other organizations like, Symantec, McAfee or Snopes. However, there is no such confirmation available by these companies. Not even Facebook!

Before you “share” a message like this, make sure you do a quick search on Google to check whether the information is true or not. Reputed blogs will make a note about it whether the information is correct or simply a fake.

Now that you’ve known that the message is a fake, make a good deed by letting your friends know about it by sharing this post with them. Also, make sure that you inform the original poster of the message that the message is simply a hoax.

We always keep our readers updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. So, make sure you’ve bookmarked our Techie Buzz Facebook Scams page. Alternatively, you can follow our dedicated scams page on Facebook – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

OMG Check Out This, Jumping Crab Video Facebook Scam

A new video scam called "OMG Check Out This Jumping Crab", similar to the check out my home video scam is spreading on . The scam is dangerous because it downloads a virus/malware to your computer.

The Facebook scam is spreading with the following message:

OMG! CHECK OUT THIS? Jumping Crab learn more about jumpingbaby

Of late, I have seen this scam spread with several different messages. However, it looks like the people behind the scam are similar because they are targeting people and asking them to install a "DivX Plugin" and a " premium plugin". DO NOT Install anything because it is a malware/virus.

Jumping Crab Scam

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

No, Facebook Will Not Require Social Security Number for Log In

Lately, there has been a hoax message spreading across the social networking site Facebook, indicating that the site is planning to add a new security feature where users will have to enter their Social Security Number (SSN) in order to successfully log in to the site.

Here’s the message that has been spreading across the network –

Facebook will Require Social Security Number for Member Log In. [LINK] Today, Facebook announced a new procedure to address the recent wave of spam that has plagued the website. Starting April 2nd, users will be required to enter their social security numbers to log in to their Facebook accounts.

There is no such announcement made by Facebook, and it is pointless to integrate such a feature on the site. Social Security number is issued to U.S. citizens, both permanent and permanent resident, under section 205(c)(2) of the Social Security Act. Facebook has over 850 million users worldwide and the procedure would simply not work in anyway.

The hoax message originated from the site – FreeWoodPost.com with the following statement –

The new member log in format will be both safe and efficient for our users who fear having their Facebook identity stolen. The requirement for users to enter their social security numbers during log in, will completely take away the element of spam from unauthorized access. With cooperation from the United States government, we have compiled a database to verify that each person’s social security is accurate. Also, the last four digits of each users social will be displayed in their info section of their profile. Further upgrades to security are currently being planned, and will be announced as more information is given.

Social Security Number Log in - Facebook Hoax

Users on Facebook have taken this hoax message seriously, and are spreading the same on their Timelines and updating their friends about the hoax by sharing the post link. The site – freewoodpost.com has the following line in one of the posts – “Remember, our tagline is “News That’s Almost Reliable”… a purely satirical and humorous “news” website,” which clearly indicates that articles published on the site are generally cooked up and nothing is true about it.

The site invites contributors to write for their blog and mentions that they’re only looking for articles that are “outrageous political humor that is indirect and satirical.”

Thus, please make sure that you avoid “sharing” such false messages on Facebook. A quick search on Google will provide you with details whether the information you’re sharing is true or simply a hoax.

We always keep our readers updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. So, make sure you’ve bookmarked our Techie Buzz Facebook Scams page. Alternatively, you can follow our dedicated scams page on Facebook – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.