Court Order Denies Samsung Preview of iPad 3 and iPhone 5

The lawsuits war between Apple and Samsung has been going on for a long time. Apple first filed suit against Samsung in April, claiming that the Samsung Galaxy line too closely imitated the look and feel of its iOS devices. Samsung then fired back at Apple, filing 10 different patent infringement claims against Apple over the iPhone and the iPad.

Samsung Apple LawsuitIn May, Samsung’s lawyers demanded that they wanted to see Apple’s future products because devices like the Droid Charge and Galaxy Tab 10.1 ¬†will presumably be in the market at the same time as the iPhone 5 and iPad 3, and they want to evaluate any possible similarities so they can prepare for further potential legal action from Apple. The request came after the court ordered Samsung to show prototypes of its new, already-announced devices to Apple.

As expected, the U.S. Circuit judge yesterday denied Samsung’s request to preview iPad 3 and iPhone 5. In her 11 page order, Judge Lucy Koh tried to explain in detail the reasons for which Samsung’s request was rejected.

The Court concludes that Samsung has not shown good cause to justify expedited discovery of Apple’s future products, packaging, and packaging inserts. Samsung’s motion to compel is therefore DENIED. As noted above, the Court nonetheless believes that Samsung should be entitled to parity in discovery directed at Apple’s potential ¬†preliminary injunction motion. If Samsung had requested reasonable discovery along the lines discussed at the hearing on Apple’s motion for expedited discovery, the Court would have granted the request. However, as Samsung has not requested such discovery in this motion, the Court ¬†cannot order it. In any case, it appears that Apple may be willing to provide such discovery without the need for Court intervention

Judge also noted that, Samsung’s claim of prejudice was undermined to some extent by evidence that Samsung has already released images and samples of its forthcoming products to the media and members of the public.” iPad 3 and iPhone 5 on the other hand are only rumours based on media reports and given iPad 2 was launched earlier this year, there is very little chance of Apple releasing iPad 3 anytime soon.

Everything was not good for Apple though. A part of judge’s order hinted that Apple may not get an injunction against Samsung unless it provides the iPhone 5 or the iPad 3 to the court for evaluation. It means, Samsung can continue to sell its mobile devices in the U.S. and is not under any pressure to reach a settlement in this case.

You can read the full order here:

Court Order Denying Motion Re iPhone 5 iPad 3

Samsung Galaxy S L (I9003) Android 2.3 Gingerbread Firmware Leaks

This month, a lot of firmware for different Galaxy branded handsets have leaked on the Internet, thanks to the folks over at SamFirmware.

Now, the SamFirmware guys have done it again, and managed to get their hands on a bunch of Android 2.3.3 firmware for the Samsung Galaxy S L. Apparently, one of the leaked firmware is based on Android 2.3.4, but sadly does not come with a video chat compatible version of Google Talk.

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The Samsung Galaxy S L is a toned down version of the Galaxy S, with an 4-inch S-LCD screen, an OMAP processor, PowerVR SGX530GPU, 512MB of RAM and 4GB of on-board storage. The handset is only available in select regions of the world including India and Russia. It is a pretty popular handset, and is one of the best mid-range Android handset available at the moment.

Now, Samsung Galaxy S L (I9003) owners, who flashed the firmware on their handset, are reporting an improved system performance and stability, along with a noticeable increase in battery life.

Galaxy S L owners, who are interested in flashing this ROM on their handset, should head over to this link to download the firmware.

Samsung Galaxy S II Review–SLIM, SEXY and FAST!

The Motorola Droid was the most popular Android phone in 2009. The Droid along with Verizon’s DROID campaign played a very major role in Android’s popularity. In 2010, the Samsung Galaxy S was the de-facto Android handset. The phone sold in excess of 10 million handsets within 7 months of its launch. The handset helped Android in gaining market share outside the U.S.

When Samsung announced the Galaxy S II at MWC this year, the expectations from the handset were pretty high. Everyone hoped that Samsung had solved the issues which plagued the original Galaxy S poor GPS performance and the lag issue.

The Samsung Galaxy S II has a huge task on its shoulder, meet the popularity of its original brother and also emerge the top-dog in this dual core race with HTC Sensation and LG Optimus 2X.

Read our review to find out whether the Samsung Galaxy S II lives up to the expectations or not.

Specs of Samsung Galaxy S II :

  • 4.27-inch Super-AMOLED+ screen with WVGA (800×480) resolution
  • 1.2GHz Dual-core Exynos 4210 processor
  • ARM-Mali 400 GPU
  • 1GB RAM, 16GB/32GB on-board storage
  • 8MP camera with Auto-Focus, LED Flash
  • 2MP Front Facing Camera
  • Dual-band Wi-Fi b/g/n, Bluetooth 3.0 HS, Wi-Fi Direct, HSDPA/HSUPA, USB O-T-G, MHL port, Accelerometer, Gyroscope, GPS with A-GPS, Proximity Sensor

Build Quality and Screen

Right out of the box, Galaxy S II will surprise you with its extremely light weight, slim waistline and the big screen. The handset weighs only 113gms, and is one of the slimmest Android handsets, measuring only 8.49mm.

The phone is constructed with plastic, like the original Galaxy S. However, the handset feels a hell lot better when held in hand, when compared to the original Galaxy S. Samsung also re-designed the back cover on the Galaxy S II so as to make it pleasant to hold and scratch proof. However, the back cover is extremely thin. However, I am pleased to say that the back cover won’t break so easily, even if you twist it.

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The top of the handset sports a 3.5mm audio jack, while the bottom houses the MHL or microUSB port. The microUSB port on the Galaxy S II can output videos at 1080p, when an MHL adapter is plugged in. The power button is situated on the right side, while the volume button is on the left side of the phone.

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Unlike most other Android handsets, the Samsung Galaxy S II sports only 3 buttons Menu, Home and Back, in the same order. Like its predecessor, the Menu and Back buttons are capacitive while the Home button is a physical one.

The build quality of the Galaxy S II is a HUGE improvement over the Galaxy S. The phone might not have a premium look or feel to it, but neither does it have a cheap build quality feeling.

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The handset sports a 4.27-inch Super-AMOLED+ screen with WVGA (800×480) resolution. Even though the SGS II sports a bigger screen than the Galaxy S (4-inch), it has a much sharper screen. This is because the Super-AMOLED+ screen has twice the sub-pixels, when compared to the Super-AMOLED screen on SGS.

The original Super-AMOLED screen has a PenTile Matrix display, while the Super-AMOLED+ screen has a RBG pixel arrangement. This is a major reason why the Galaxy S II has a bigger display than its predecessor. Excluding all the geeky part, the SAMOLED+ screen on the SGS II is absolutely brilliant. The contrast, viewing angles, and brightness are all top-notch. Sunlight legibility is decent as well.

Samsung Captivate Android 2.3.3 Gingerbread Firmware Leaks

Samsung released the Android 2.2 FroYo update for the Galaxy S in October, last year. However, it was only at the beginning of this year that the Samsung Galaxy S variants in the U.S got the Android 2.2 Froyo update.

Recently, Sammy started rolling out the Android 2.3 Gingerbread update for the Galaxy S and other Galaxy branded devices over the different regions of the world. However, Samsung did not mention anything whether the various Galaxy S variants in the U.S will get the Gingerbread love or not.

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Now, the folks over at SamFirmware have managed to get their hands on not one, but two, Android 2.3.3 Gingerbread based firmware for the AT&T version of the Galaxy S the Samsung Captivate. One firmware (I897UCKF1) carries the build date of June 8th, while the second one (I897UCKE3) has a recent build date of June 26.

The carriers in the U.S. are evil about rolling out Android updates. They play a major role in delaying Android updates of various handsets, and if they do, load it up with lots of bloat ware. While this firmware leak confirms that the Captivate will get the Gingerbread update, don’t expect the update to land anytime soon.

Mugen Batteries Review For The Samsung Galaxy S And HTC Desire Z

Poor Battery life is one of the major issues with most of the Android phones out there. Previously, I wrote about an app called Juice Defender which helps in increasing the battery life of Android phones. However, tweaks and apps alone cannot make up for low capacity batteries in Android phones, especially from HTC.

Under heavy usage most of the Android phones will hardly last a day. Due to this, many hardcore Android handset owners buy a third party higher battery for their handset. These third party batteries come in two flavors one without an extended back cover and another one with a back cover, which usually adds a couple of inches thickness to the phone.

Mugen Battery is one popular third party high capacity battery manufacturer. The company has high capacity batteries available for nearly all Android, WP7 and Symbian handsets.

Recently, I got trial units of Mugen battery for the Samsung Galaxy S and the HTC Desire Z.

For the Samsung Galaxy S, Mugen offers two batteries one with a 1650mAh capacity, and another one with a whopping 3200mAh capacity and an extended back cover. Similarly, for the Desire Z, Mugen offers an 1800mAh battery along with a 3600mAh battery and an extended back door.

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First up, the review of both the Mugen batteries available for the Samsung Galaxy S.

The 1650mAh battery from Mugen only has a slightly higher capacity from the OEM Galaxy S battery. I tried the battery with several different ROMs including CM7 and the stock ROM, and managed to squeeze out couple of hours worth of extra battery life compared to the stock/OEM battery. With the stock 1500mAh battery from Samsung, I get around 11 hours of battery life on 3G without Juice Defender.

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The second 3200mAh battery from Mugen for the Galaxy S is the real show-stopper though. The extended back cover with the 3200mAh battery does make the Galaxy S noticeably thick, and heavy. However, the build quality and texture of the Mugen back cover is also better than the stock back cover from Samsung. It also helps in improving the grip on the SGS.

With this battery, I managed to get more than 2 days of continuous usage or heavy usage. With more than 4 hours of voice calls, a couple of hours of Tank Hero and Tilt Arena, and an hour of browsing on 3G, the battery lasted me 2 days 10 hours before dying.

The 1650mAh battery is a great buy for anyone who is looking for a spare or a replacement battery for his Galaxy S, without increasing the bulk of the phone.The 3200mAh battery is an easy recommendation to any Galaxy S owner who travels frequently, and is rarely around a power source.

Now, here is the review of the Mugen batteries for the HTC Desire Z.

The 1800mAh battery for the Desire Z from Mugen is a pretty big improvement over the stock 1300mAh battery, capacity wise. With the stock battery, the Desire Z lasts me around 14 hours on 3G with some heavy gaming and tweeting with 1 Gmail, Facebook and Twitter account syncing in the background. With the 1800mAh battery from Mugen, I was able to squeeze around 21 hours of battery life on more or less the same usage as stated before.

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An increase in battery life by a whopping 7 hours, without replacing the battery cover is a huge improvement. I wonder if Mugen can fit in an 1800mAh battery, why does HTC ship a measly 1300mAh battery with the Desire Z.

The 3600mAh battery along with the extended back cover, when installed gives the Desire Z a very weird look. Unlike, the Galaxy S, the extended back cover on the Desire Z only covers a part of the handset. This is not a fault of the Mugen though. The Desire Z was never made with an extra-thick battery door in mind. The Mugen battery door is made up of plastic, unlike the original metal back plate found on the Z.

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Now, like its lesser capacity sibling, this 3600mAh battery packs some serious punch. The Desire Z lasted a staggering 3 days and 5 hours, with still 10% of charge left. I used the phone for around 6+ hours of music via earphones, nearly an hour of Internet browsing on a mix of 3G and Wi-Fi, lots of tweeting with 1 Gmail, Facebook and Twitter account syncing in the background.

Readers should keep in mind that battery life will vary depending on their usage, but even then they can easily squeeze out more than 40+ hours of battery life from the 3600mAh battery.

I can easily recommend both the Mugen batteries 1800mAh and 3600mAh for the Desire Z. The former costs $44.95, while the latter costs a whopping $96.95.

At the end of this review, I can easily say that Mugen Battery is the best third party battery available for your precious phone. Not only do they increase the battery life substantially, they are also available in different sizes according to a users need.

Google Nexus S Now Available In India For Just Rs.19,999

Google announced its first Android Gingerbread powered device, the Samsung Google Nexus S in December. This handset is the successor of the original Nexus One and it is one of the best Android smartphone. Back in April, Samsung launched the much-awaited Nexus S in India with a price tag of Rs.29,950. But, after the launch of Samsung Galaxy S II in India, the price of the Google Nexus S have been dropped to a great extent.

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Google Nexus S features a 4 inch Super Clear LCD display with 800 x 480 pixels resolution, 1 GHz application processor, Android 2.3.4 (Gingerbread) OS, Wi-Fi, USB 2.0, Bluetooth 2.1 with EDR, 3G connectivity, 5 megapixel camera with Auto Focus, VGA front camera, HD (720p) video recording, NFC (Near Field Communication) Capability, A-GPS, 16 GB internal memory, 512MB RAM, Accelerometer, Digital compass, Proximity and Light Sensor, Android Market and a 1500 mAh battery.

The powerful Nexus S is currently available in India for just Rs.19,999 (approx. $450). You heard it right! The Nexus S can now be purchased for nearly Rs.10,000 cheaper. This is one of the best Android smartphone, currently available in India. If you are planning to buy a new Android smartphone, then you should definitely check out the amazing Nexus S. To purchase this handset, head over to Flipkart or LetsBuy.

Apple iPad 3 Coming This Christmas with 6x Better Resolution Than iPad 2

According to a report from Reuters, Apple has scheduled to launch iPad 3 in Q4 of this year. iPad 3 is expected to have a surprisingly impressive 6x the resolution of the current iPad 2.

It does sounds interesting and makes you think “wow”, but I guess that’s quite a high increase in resolution and as a matter of fact that display will be way too expensive and completely unnecessary.

Apple iPad Launch

There have been rumors earlier that focused on Apple’s iPad 3 display. Some claim that the next-generation table could have 3D screen. It is also rumored that Apple was plans on Samsung’s AMOLED panels for the iPad 3.

Samsung Galaxy S Android 2.3.4 Gingerbread Update Leaks

Samsung started rolling out the Android 2.3.3 Gingerbread update for the European Galaxy S handsets, during the middle of this month. The Gingerbread roll-out is not even complete all over the world, and the Android 2.3.4 firmware for the handset has leaked.

The folks over at SamFirmware.com have managed to get their hands on the leaked Android 2.3.4 firmware (XXJVP) for the Samsung Galaxy S, which carries a June 3 build date. The Android 2.3.4 update for the Nexus S brought video calling via Google Talk, and better battery consumption along with some bug fixes.

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Sadly, the leaked Android 2.3.4 Galaxy S firmware does not include the latest Google Talk version, which means video chatting via the front cam is a no-go. The update also fixes the high battery drain caused by the Android System process in Android 2.3.3.

However, SGS owners who flashed the firmware on their handset report that the phone’s performance is blazing fast now. The phone averages around 1800 points in the Quadrant benchmark on the leaked firmware.

Hopefully, Samsung will officially release the Android 2.3.4 firmware for the Galaxy S soon, with the latest version of Google Talk with video chat support.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 I/O Edition Android 3.1 Honeycomb Update Rolling Out Now

Samsung has started rolling out the Android 3.1 Honeycomb update for the Galaxy Tab 10.1 I/O edition tablets. Samsung and Google gave these tablets as gifts to each of the Google I/O attendees.

The Android 3.1 Honeycomb update for the Tab 10.1 brings some much needed performance and stability improvements. The update also brings new features like USB host functionality, unlimited number of apps in the multi-tasking pane, inline HTML5 playback and the ability to resize widgets.

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The update also adds the Google Books app, and removes some apps like the Amazon, Kindle, Samsung Apps, Music Hub and WeatherBug. Galaxy Tab 10.1 I/O edition owners, who have rooted their device, need not worry as the update preserves your root access.

Users who have not got the OTA update notification, can manually pull the update from Samsung’s server by going to About Tablet> Software Updates option. Users also need to create a Samsung account, before they can download and install the OTA update. Tab owners should make sure that they have not encrypted the data on their device, before installing the update.

The Galaxy Tab 10.1 I/O edition is also slated to receive an update in the future, which will replace the stock Android installation on the device with TouchWIZ 4.0.

Samsung Sends CyanogenMod Developers Galaxy S II; Shows Its Support To Developers!

The Samsung Galaxy S had a relatively easy method to root, and did not feature an encrypted boot loader. Still, the phone never got quality ROMs based on AOSP. It was only a year after its release, that the phone got official support from the CyanogenMod team.

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However, like Sony Ericsson and HTC, Samsung knows that they should get developers to support their phone. So, while HTC was encrypting boot loader on their latest handsets (EVO 3D, Sensation), the Galaxy S II boot loader was unprotected. Later on, Samsung also released the Galaxy S II source in less than a week of its launch.

Unlike the Galaxy S, SGS II was much better, cleaner, and the kernel’s source code did not feature any proprietary code. Now, in a bid to further support developers and custom ROMs for the Galaxy S II, Samsung has gone ahead and sent a few developers a Galaxy S II.

The developers @atinm, @codeworkx, @dumdidum and @unhelpful were the main mastermind behind brining CM7 to the Galaxy S. By gifting these developers a SGS II, Samsung surely is helping them in porting CM7 to the handset.

Kudos to Samsung for supporting these developers, who are working on bringing CM7 to the Galaxy S II.