Tag Archives: Samsung

Apple Rejects Samsung Compromise Offer for Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia

As we all know by now, Apple and Samsung are in a patent battle. A week ago, it was  reported  that  Steve Jobs was said to have contacted Samsung in July of 2010, initiating negotiations between the two companies regarding the patent disputes. The effort proved to be unsuccessful, which caused Apple to file mutiple patent lawsuits against Samsung.

At present, Apple is seeking an injunction against Samsung preventing the sale of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia. Samsung  agreed  to delay the device’s launch several times as the injunction was being considered by the court. Last week,  The Wall Street Journal  reported  that  Samsung’s lawyers had proposed a deal to Apple that would allow Samsung to launch its delayed Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia as soon as next week. Samsung’s proposed deal was not disclosed to the court.

Now, Reuters reports that Apple has rejected that offer from Samsung that would have allowed the company to release its Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia.

“It is one we don’t accept and there is no surprise. The main reason we are here is to prevent the launch (of the Galaxy 10.1) and maintain the status quo,” Apple attorney Steven Burley told the Federal Court.

Apple is currently involved in legal disputes against Android handset makers, including Samsung and HTC. Samsung has  fired back  with its own lawsuits, which has caused the two companies to be involved in lawsuits spread across four continents. Apple  has recently won cases against both Samsung and HTC.

Apple iPhone 4S vs. Samsung Galaxy S II–Which Is The Ultimate Smartphone?

Yesterday, Apple announced the highly anticipated successor to the iPhone 4, the iPhone 4S. However, many Apple loyalists were disappointed with the iPhone 4S since the phone did not have any innovative feature. The most disappointing part about the iPhone 4S is that it looks exactly like its predecessor, and is in fact heavier by 4 grams.

Now, that the iPhone 4S has been announced, it is more than obvious that the handset will be stacked against the current top-end Android handset, the Samsung Galaxy S II.

Below is a small comparison of the Samsung Galaxy S 2 and the iPhone 4S.

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Design

Dimension wise, the Samsung Galaxy S II is larger, slimmer and bigger than the iPhone 4S. Compared to the Galaxy S II dimensions of 125.3 x 66.1 x 8.5 mm, the iPhone 4S has dimensions of 115.2 x 58.6 x 9.3 mm. Last year, when Apple announced the iPhone 4, it vowed everyone with how slim the handset was. However, it was disappointing to see its successor having the same dimensions as the previous generation iPhone. The Galaxy S II weighs in at 113gms, while the iPhone 4 weighs 138gms.

While the iPhone 4S is primarily made of glass and metal, the Galaxy S II is made of plastic. Both the handsets are pretty stylish as well. However, out of the two, I would prefer the Samsung Galaxy S II, since at least it can be easily distinguished from the original Galaxy S, unlike the iPhone 4S.

Display

The Samsung Galaxy S II has a 4.3-inch SuperAMOLED Plus display with WVGA(800×480) resolution, while the iPhone 4S has a comparatively tiny 3.5-inch IPS LCD Retina Display’ with an eye-popping resolution of 640×960. Like the iPhone 4, the iPhone 4S trumps the Galaxy S 2 in terms of resolution and pixels. However, I would prefer the Samsung Galax S II just because it has a much bigger display with eye-popping colors and contrast ratios.

Also, it is just a matter of weeks (perhaps, days?) before the next-generation Android handsets trump the iPhone 4S with their 720p HD (1280×720) resolution. The Nexus Prime is reportedly rumored to have a 720p HD resolution. The Samsung Galaxy S II HD LTE already has a 4.65-inch SuperAMOLED display with 720p resolution.

Hardware

The Samsung Galaxy S II sports an Exynos 4210 SoC, which contains a 1.2GHz Cortex-A9 dual-core processor along with an ARM-Mali 400MP GPU. Like the iPad 2, the iPhone 4S is powered by an A5 SoC. The A5 SoC consists of a Cortex-A9 dual core, running at unknown frequency and a powerful PowerVR SGX543MP2 GPU.

While the CPU on the Galaxy S II trumps the iPhone 4S in terms of raw processing power, the tables turn when it comes to GPU. The PowerVR SGX543MP2 GPU is way ahead of the ARM Mali-400MP GPU in terms of performance.

OS

While the Samsung Galaxy S II runs on Android 2.3 Gingerbread, with Samsung’s proprietary TouchWIZ 4.0 UI on top of it. The iPhone 4S runs on iOS5, which includes a completely revamped notification center, iMessage, new camera app, and many other changes.

Compared to iOS5, the Android 2.3 Gingerbread OS on the Samsung Galaxy S II looks pretty stale. Hopefully, things will change when Google announces the next major version of Android this month Ice Cream Sandwich.

Camera

Both the Samsung Galaxy S II and the iPhone 4S have an 8MP camera with an LED flash. While the Samsung Galaxy S II camera has an aperture size of 2.65, the iPhone 4S camera has an aperture size of 2.4. The iPhone 4S has a custom ISP designed by Apple, thanks to which it has features like Face recognition, Hybrid IR filter and auto-white balance. From the camera samples released by Apple, it looks like the iPhone 4S is capable of taking better photos compared to the Samsung Galaxy S II. There is not much difference between the picture quality though. However, in low-light conditions, the iPhone 4S totally trumps the Samsung Galaxy S II pictures.

Both the handsets are also capable of recording videos in Full HD (1080p) resolution at 30FPS. The most interesting feature of the iPhone 4S is that it sports real-time video image stabilization, along with real-time temporal noise reduction. Thanks to these features, the iPhone 4S records much better videos than the Galaxy S II. This does not mean that the Samsung Galaxy S II camera is bad. It still has one of the best cameras among the Android handsets.

The Verdict

This is perhaps for the first time, that a product announcement from Apple has led to a disappointment. The iPhone 4S while has evolutionary hardware, still sports a very small screen compared to the competition from its Droid counterparts. Also, it looks exactly like its predecessor, which is not a good thing. Had the iPhone 4S been released at WWDC 2011, it would not have been such a disappointment. But, 14 months after the iPhone 4, the iPhone 4S is nothing but a disappointment.

So, who is the ultimate winner? While this is a fairly sensitive and personal issue, I would like to leave this decision on our readers. Drop on your comments, and let us know who the ultimate winner is.

Samsung Releases A New Teaser Video of the Nexus Prime

Last night, Apple unveiled the next-generation iPhone 4S. While externally, the iPhone 4S looks the same, internally it sports an A5 SoC, better camera and is a world phone. Nevertheless, many people have been disappointed by the new iPhone.

Now, all eyes are set on the upcoming Samsung-Google Nexus Prime event. Today, Samsung has released a new video of their upcoming Unpacked event, which also gives us a sneak peek into the upcoming Nexus handset.

Below is the video :

From the above video, the Prime looks like one sexy, thin and curvaceous handset. The small jut which you at the back of the handset see in the video, is of the camera. The three dots which one sees on the handset, are apparently the connector for the docking station.

This video from Samsung is definitely going to raise the curiosity and anticipation for the next Nexus handset, to an all time high.

The Nexus Prime is rumored to sport a massive 4.65-inch display with a staggering 720p (1280×720) resolution. The handset will also run on the latest version of Android, which is Ice Cream Sandwich.

Samsung Proposes Deal with Apple for Galaxy Tab Launch in Australia

Apple vs Samsung

As we all know by now, Apple and Samsung are in a patent battle. Yesterday, it was reported that  Steve Jobs was said to have contacted Samsung in July of 2010, initiating negotiations between the two companies regarding the patent disputes. The effort proved to be unsuccessful, which caused Apple to file mutiple patent lawsuits against Samsung.

At present, Apple is seeking an injunction against Samsung preventing the sale of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia. Samsung  agreed  to delay the device’s launch several times as the injunction is being considered by the court. Today, The Wall Street Journal reports that  Samsung’s lawyers have proposed a deal to Apple that would allow Samsung to launch its delayed Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia as soon as next week. According to the report, the  terms of Samsung’s proposed deal was not disclosed to the court.

It wasn’t clear what benefit Apple would gain from any agreement, as details of the proposed deal were not discussed in full in front of the court. But Apple’s attorney, Stephen Burley, conceded there was some potential benefit from an agreement on the matter. “(Samsung’s) inconvenience would be diminished and we would be comforted” by such a deal, he said.

Justice Annabelle Bennett said that the proposed deal wouldn’t give Samsung the satisfaction of a final answer to the dispute, but Mr. Catterns said it would at least allow the company to sell its new tablet computer ahead of the crucial Christmas sales period.

Apple is currently involved in legal disputes against Android handset makers, including Samsung and HTC. Samsung has  fired back  with its own lawsuits, which has caused the two companies to be involved in lawsuits spread across four continents. Apple  has recently won cases against both Samsung and HTC.

Honestly, if you ask me, Samsung isn’t copying  Apple at all. Nope, not at all.

Steve Jobs Contacted Samsung in 2010 to Resolve Apple Patent Dispute

Apple vs. Samsung

As we all know by now, Apple and Samsung are in a patent battle. According to a new report from Bloomberg today, reveals that Steve Jobs was said to have contacted Samsung in July of 2010, initiating negotiations between the two companies, Apple attorneys told an Australian court this week. However, Jobs was no longer involved once the actual talks over Samsung’s Galaxy S smartphone began.

This effort proved to be unsuccessful, which caused Apple to file mutiple patent lawsuits against Samsung. Since April, Apple has accused Samsung of copying the look and feel of the iPhone and iPad. Samsung fired back with its own lawsuits, which caused the two companies to be involved in lawsuits that spread across four continents.  Apple is seeking an injunction against Samsung preventing the sale of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia. Samsung agreed to delay the device’s launch several times as the injunction is being considered by the court.

“Samsung is an important supplier with whom we have a deep relationship,” Apple patent attorney, Richard Lutton, reportedly said in court on Thursday. “We wanted to give them a chance to do the right thing.”

Clearly, Samsung isn’t copying Apple.

Google and Samsung to Launch the Nexus Prime and Android Ice Cream Sandwich on October 11

Samsung and Google have started inviting tech blogs to a special “Samsung Mobile Unpacked 2011 – Google Episode” event. The event will be held on October 11 at 11.30 AM, and it’s very likely that the next rumored Google Android flagship device — the Nexus Prime — will be unveiled at this event, along with the next version of Android — Ice Cream Sandwich.

Here’s an image of the invite, via Techcrunch

Samsung Google Ice Cream Sandwich Event

The Nexus Prime will be the first smartphone running Android Ice Cream Sandwich and will be the best phone yet, in terms of specifications. It is rumored to have a 1.5 GHz dual core processor, a 4.65 inch touchscreen display and will support 4G connectivity.

Ice Cream Sandwich aims to unify the smartphone and tablet versions of Android. It also hopes to address the very pertinent problem of fragmentation.

Apple recently announced that it will be launching a new iPhone on October 4. Amazon launched its new Kindle Fire tablet just yesterday.

Hopefully, we should see an Ice Cream Sandwich update for major devices rolling out soon after the official launch. I can’t wait to install it on my Samsung Galaxy S 2.

For now, check out this video of a Nexus S running Ice Cream Sandwich by Engadget.

Sony Ericsson Supports ‘FreeXperia’ Developers By Giving Them 20 Handsets and More!

Last year, Sony Ericsson was criticized heavily for releasing a sub-par high-end Android phone, the X10. To add to their woes, the company took ages to update the handset to Android 2.1 Éclair, and decided not to upgrade the handset to Android 2.2 FroYo. For developers, the locked boot loader on SE’s handsets made things tough for them.

However, since the beginning of this year the company has changed for good. The 2011 range of Xperia handsets have decent specs, and most important ran the latest version of Android Gingerbread. The company has also been providing timely software updates to its Xperia handsets, with every new software update adding new features. The company also released a boot loader unlocking tool for its handsets, and wrote a guide on how to build a Linux kernel, showing their support to the developers and their work.

Today, in a bid to support help the developers more, the company has decided to assist the FreeXperiagroup of developers. The FreeXperia’ group of developers have played a major role in bringing CyanogenMod 7 to all Xperia handsets. However, the CM7 ROM for all Xperia handsets have one major issue the camera does not work properly. This is because Sony uses some proprietary drivers for their camera module, making things tough for developers to reverse engineer them.

Now, Sony Ericsson has decided to help the FreeXperia’ team of developers on many issues, including the camera, where they will be providing debugged and rebuilt library binaries to them. SE will also be supporting the devs. by providing them with approximately 20 devices.

Earlier this year, Samsung also supported the Team Hacksung’ developers by providing them with a Samsung Galaxy S II. However, while the developers have been successful in porting CM7 to the device, there are still some major issues to be resolved, including Bluetooth audio (A2DP). Hopefully, Samsung will learn something from Sony Ericsson and help the Team Hacksung developers with the Bluetooth Audio issue.

Samsung Galaxy S II Mugen 3200mAh Battery Review

A few months ago, I had reviewed the Mugen Battery for the Samsung Galaxy S and the HTC Desire Z. I was thoroughly impressed by the batteries, and have been recommending them ever since to my friends. When the Samsung Galaxy S II was launched in India, it was all but natural for me to go and get the latest and the best Android smartphone around.

The Galaxy S II really does not have any serious drawbacks, and is SLIM, SEXY and FAST! I had no major issues with the battery life of the Galaxy S II, but I was eagerly waiting for the folks behind Mugen to release the extended batteries for the SGS2. It was just a matter of time before Mugen released two new extended batteries for the Galaxy S II, with a capacity of 1700mAh and 3200mAh respectively. I was pretty disappointed with the 1700mAh battery since it only offered a 50mAh boost in the capacity compared to the stock battery. The performance difference between the stock and the Mugen 1700mAh battery was going to be barely noticeable.

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It was pretty much logical that the 3200mAh battery was going to offer stellar performance since it offered nearly double the capacity of the stock battery. The only real drawback of this extended battery is that it requires an extended backcover, and adds noticeable thickness to the phone. My main purpose of this review was to find out whether the extra bulge added by the extended battery is manageable or not. When I reviewed the Mugen extended battery for the HTC Desire Z, the extra thickness and weight added to an already thick and heavy phone, making things tough. It was quite a task to manage such a thick and heavy Desire Z.

So after using the Mugen 3200mAh battery for the Samsung Galaxy S II for nearly 3 to 4 weeks, here are my thoughts about it.

Performance

I have absolutely no doubt in my mind about the performance of the Mugen 3200mAh battery. The battery may add noticeable thickness to the phone, but its well worth a trade-off. After switching to the Mugen battery, I started playing more games, watching more videos and listening to music on my Samsung Galaxy S II, without the fear of the phone’s battery lasting me only a day. In fact, even after a day of extremely heavy usage, the phone still has enough battery left to last me at least another 12 hours of light usage.

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On stock battery
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On Mugen 3200mAh battery

Yes, I am using a leaked Android 2.3.4 firmware along with a custom kernel on my SGS2, which definitely has brought about a noticeable improvement in battery life. Make no mistake about the performance of the Mugen 3200mAh battery for the Galaxy S II. It will in no way disappoint you.

Thickness vs. Performance

While the Mugen 3200mAh battery does improve the battery life, it also adds noticeable thickness to the phone. Thankfully, the Samsung Galaxy S II is one of the slimmest (8.49mm) Android handsets around, and even after installing the 3200mAh, it remains fairly portable. This is, unlike other thick handsets, like the HTC Thunderbolt, where using an extended battery makes the already thick phone, a brick!

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Now, the main question which most Mugen buyers ask themselves before buying their battery Is the improvement in battery life worth a trade-off for a thick phone? According to me, yes it is! The improvement in battery life thanks to the Mugen battery is tremendous, and is just too good to miss. For me, the extra bulk added by the battery is manageable, and I don’t have any issues in using the Mugen battery on a day-to-day basis. The bulk does make the beautiful SGS2 look ugly though.

Until there is some significant advancement in the world of battery technology, Mugen extended batteries are your and your phones’ best friend!

Interested readers can buy Mugen batteries for their handset from here.

Samsung Finally Gets in Bed with Microsoft; Signs Patent Deal

Microsoft, which is on track to make billions from patent licensing deals with Android device manufacturers, signed its biggest patent deal with Samsung today.

According to the terms of the cross-licensing deal, Microsoft will get royalty revenue for every Android smartphone or tablet that Samsung sells. Considering that Samsung is the largest Android device manufacturer, this will mean some serious cash for Microsoft.

Microsoft’s General Counsel stated:

“Together with the license agreement signed last year with HTC, today’s agreement with Samsung means that the top two Android handset manufacturers in the United States have now acquired licenses to Microsoft’s patent portfolio. These two companies together accounted for more than half of all Android phones sold in the U.S. over the past year. That leaves Motorola Mobility, with which Microsoft is currently in litigation, as the only major Android smartphone manufacturer in the U.S. without a license.”

The exact licensing fee hasn’t been revealed, but it should be around $10.

The way things are going, it seems very likely that Microsoft will continue to make much more money off Android than it will by selling Windows Phone 7 licenses. It now has deals with Samsung, HTC, Acer, Onkyo, Velocity Micro, ViewSonic and some more.

With the cross-licensing deal, Samsung may also get access to some patents which it can use to defend itself against Apple’s lawsuits.

This leads us to wonder if Google’s Motorola acquisition was worth anything at all. Almost all of its device partners have already signed deals with Microsoft.

Tizen Rises from the Ashes of MeeGo; Backed by Intel and Samsung

The smartphone landscape has seen a lot of disruption ever since Apple launched the iPhone in 2007. Most of the existing platforms, like Symbian, Blackberry, Windows Mobile etc., have either been killed or have been rendered useless. Google launched Android and went from a zero market share to being the market leader in a couple of years. Microsoft seems to have adapted well and launched Windows Phone 7, the successor of Windows Mobile.

Nokia’s Maemo and Intel’s Moblin, which were hardly seeing any traction, combined to form MeeGo, backed by both the companies. When Nokia embraced Windows Phone 7 in a bid to revive itself, Intel tried to save MeeGo. However, there wasn’t much it could have done to save it from its eventual fate – being dead-pooled.

Today, Intel has merged MeeGo (which was almost in a zombie state) with LiMo, another dying platform, to form Tizen. LiMo will host the project and Intel will support its development along with Samsung. If you’re wondering what the hell Samsung is doing with Tizen, when it has Bada to look after, don’t worry, you’re not alone. Everyone is wondering the same thing.

Reports indicate that Tizen will be launched in Q1 2012, with some devices by Intel and Samsung hitting the market by Q2 2012. I doubt Tizen will be able to attract any developers at all. Who would want to develop apps for such a whimsical platform that could be merged with some other platform after a few months, or even die?

Here’s the official announcement: Welcome to Tizen!

Today we are happy to welcome you to Tizen, a new open source project that is the home of the Tizen software platform, a mobile and device operating system based on Linux and other popular upstream projects. Tizen will support multiple device categories, such as smartphones, tablets, smart TVs, netbooks, and in-vehicle infotainment devices. The Linux Foundation will host the project, where Tizen development will be completely open and led by a technical steering team composed of Intel and Samsung.

The Tizen application programming interfaces are based on HTML5 and other web standards, and we anticipate that the vast majority of Tizen application development will be based on these emerging standards. These APIs will cover various platform capabilities, such as messaging, multimedia, camera, network, and social media. For those who use native code in their applications, the Tizen SDK will include a native development kit. We will open the entire Tizen software stack, from the core OS up through the core applications and polished user interfaces.

We expect the first release of Tizen and its SDK in the first quarter of 2012.