Tag Archives: RIAA

4Chan Takes Down RIAA, MPAA In A Pre-Meditated Attack

4Chan the notorious board who go beyond anime images have brought down the piracy watchdogs of the music and media industry in a pre-meditated DDoS attack, which might definitely be a big blot on these two powerful agencies.

RIAA 4Chan

Piracy is hard to tackle, but the music industry has RIAA and MPAA who track torrents and other downloads by placing "moles" in the downloads that are then used to track illegal downloaders and then sue the hell out of them.

However, in an about turn the members of the notorious 4Chan board have struck at both the MPAA and RIAA, systematically taking down both of their websites through a DDoS attack started out by Anon of infamous 4Chan /b/ group.

The RIAA attack which was pre-meditated and openly published was even more devastating for the agency since they already had prior info on the attack and couldn’t do anything about it. Currently the RIAA websites are too slow to open and sometimes even fail to load.

So is the 4Chan group really targeting RIAA and MPAA for them coming after illegal users, or is this a show off of the powerful Internet democracy where everyone has a right to speak what they want to?

No statement yet from RIAA or MPAA, but it might not be a surprise if they decide to sue millions of Anon users for the DDoS attacks Winking smile. This is probably the 4th high profile attack by 4Chan, with Gawker Media and Verizon being their other recent victims.

(Source: TechCrunch)

RIAA Spent More Than $16 Million in 2008 To Recover Only $0.391 Million

RIAA-Sucks If there is one thing that RIAA is famous for, it is suing people. Unfortunately for RIAA, their sue-happy policy doesn’t seem to be paying off. The Recording Industry vs. The People blog has uncovered that RIAA managed to recover only $391,000, after spending more than $16,000,000 in 2008 on litigations.

The statistics look even more dismal if you consider the three year period between 2006 and 2008. During this period RIAA spent more than $64 million and managed to recover only $1.3 million.

It’s ironic how a trust whose primary purpose is to look after the interest of artists is wasting money on litigations. The only ones benefiting from RIAA’s actions are the law firms. RIAA paid Holmes Roberts & Owen more than $9.3 million, Jenner & Block more than $7 million and Cravath Swain & Moore $1.25 million.

Well done RIAA!

When People And Websites Failed, the RIAA Starts Picking on File Sharing Software

It seems like the RIAA is running out of options and is looking for some quick and easy win in its bid to catch file sharers. It has given up attempts to force ISP’s into giving up their list of users. According to new plans, it is going after the heart of file sharing.

The latest victim of LimeWire is not any file sharing website or any student from any university. It is a software product. The charge the RIAA is pressing against LimeWire is in the range of a billion dollars. As  wired.com says, it truly seems as if the RIAA is seeking to annihilate the company behind LimeWire with that hefty an amount.

The RIAA has already made the court believe that LimeWire is causing immense amount of file sharing and the company has not taken preventive measure against this.

Just a few weeks ago, Zeeshan Zaidi the COO of LimeWire wanted to cut a deal with the RIAA to help record labels sell music on their p2p network but the idea did not impress the RIAA enough.

If this is the case, we can clearly see the future of software like uTorrent and Bittorrent. It is only time before the RIAA gets to them with another accusation and a fresh extortion amount.

(Source)

The Pirate Bay is Back With A Bang

Just yesterday, The Pirate Bay was shut down by pulling down it’s routing server. Though today, The Pirate Bay is back and as expected, they have an awesome reply to the shutdown. This time, the hosting has been changed to the Swedish Pirate Party.

the-pirate-bay

The official Pirate Bay blog has written a post giving some hilarious update on this situation.

PLZ LEARN: TPB CANT BE SHUT DOWN

LOL!

AS U MITE HAS READ OR NOTICD, PEEPS ONCE AGAIN R TRYIN 2 SHUT US DOWN. DIS WILL NOT SUCCED, LOL. OURS RLY NICE  WEBHOST WUZ THREATEND WIF RLY HUGE FINE,  SO WE DECIDD 2 MOOV TEH SIET SO DAT THEY DIDNT GOT INTO TROUBLE, LOL. TEH DECISHUN 2 MOOV WUZ TAKEN BY US, TEH PIRATE BAY, LOL.

TEH PIRATE BAY IZ AN UNSINKABLE SHIP. IT WILL SAIL TEH INTERWEBS 4 AS LONG AS WE WANTS IT 2. REMEMBR DAT, K THX.

TPB, ONLY IN IT 4 TEH LULZ SINCE 2003

You do not even need to see closely to notice whats written in those bold in-between letters. There is a message for the The RIAA in it.

US Government Agrees, Piracy Stats Are Bloated

We all are aware of the MPAA and    RIAA crackdown on file sharers and torrent seeders over the last two years.  Well now that the crackdown is getting cold, recent studies have shown that it was all overrated. Most of the piracy claims and stats were overrated. The Government Accountability Office of the US government has checked and declared that it is

difficult, if not impossible, to quantify the economy-wide impacts

of software and music piracy. This study has been conducted over a year and a 32-page report has been released in PDF format.

There was a factor of a “Substitution Rate” in earlier estimates of piracy. According to it, every lost sale was considered as a piracy. So basically, just the fact that you did not buy the software and  inquired  about it added to the piracy figures. It did not matter if you really bought a pirated copy after that, or just switched to a free alternative.

MPAA went further to manipulate stats to show that college student accounted for 44% of piracy when the actual figure was close to 15%. Though, later they covered up by calling it a human error. Now, we all know it was a human error though not so much of a humane error!

An interesting citation from the released PDF say that file sharing can actually help in sales and promotion. It appears at  Techdirt and  says,

Consumers may use pirated goods to ‘sample’ music, movies, software, or electronic games before purchasing legitimate copies,” the GAO continued. “(This) may lead to increased sales of legitimate goods.