Nokia Belle FP2 Software Update For Nokia 808 PureView Now Available

The Nokia 808 PureView is without a doubt the best camera phone out there. The handset is ages ahead of its competition in terms of camera performance, and it will easily take Samsung, HTC or even Apple nearly 4 to 5 years to catch up with the handset’s camera performance.

Starting from today, Nokia has started rolling out a new software update for the 808 PureView that will further improve the imaging experience on the handset.

Below is the full change-log of the update -:

  • Gallery Grid view when you have the phone in landscape
  • Access to more functions when you open your images from the Gallery widget on your home screen – swipe through other images, zoom, share, edit, and send images faster.
  • More information about your images, such as image resolution, ISO value, white balance setting, and file size,  and the location. When you are connected online, one click will show you on Nokia Maps where the photo was taken.
  • Select and delete multiple photos in Gallery Grid
  • New reset button in Creative mode to change all the settings back to default with a single touch
  • New and significantly faster on-screen keyboard
  • Updated browser (v8.3) with enhanced HTML5 support
  • Nokia Car Mode – easy access to your phone’s key features when you’re driving.

Nokia will also be rolling out the Belle Feature Pack 2 software update for the Nokia 603, 700 and the 701 that will include Nokia Car Mode, enhanced web browser and certain other improvements. However, the imaging and gallery enhancements are only for the 808 PureView.

Nokia Confirms PureView Technology Is Headed To Windows Phone

Last week, during the Mobile World Congress, Nokia announced the PureView 808; a phone whose prime selling point was a camera packing — wait for it — a 41MP camera sensor. Now of course, megapixels aren’t everything; they are only one ingredient in the mixture that results in a great camera that takes great photos, and an 8MP phone is perfectly capable of taking better photos than a 41MP phone.

However, there’s more to PureView than the megapixels, and you can read all about that here. It is definitely cool that they packed such a large megapixel count in a phone.

Moving on, however, something that’s unfortunate about this cool technology is that it was implemented on a phone that runs the Symbian OS. No need to fear, however; Nokia have officially confirmed that PureView is headed to Windows Phone — a real OS — sometime in the near future. Jo Harlow, Nokia’s Senior VP of Smartphones recently told Finnish newspaper Aamulethi when asked about when we can expect Nokia Windows Phone handsets to pack PureView, “I can’t say precisely when, but it will not take very long.” This is a rough translation of course; the original answer is in Finnish.

Perhaps we can expect the inevitable new lineup of Nokia devices that run Windows Phone Apollo to pack PureView.

The Technology Behind Nokia’s 808 PureView 41 Megapixel Sensor

As many of you no doubt know by now, Nokia has unveiled a new cameraphone which resolves up to 5 megapixels. The catch here is that the sensor can capture up to 41 megapixels of data. This is no doubt the largest sensor ever made on a consumer camera phone (or indeed, any camera phone ever), but what prompted the team that worked on this phone to put such a large sensor on it?


In a word, the answer is ‘zoom’. To implement optical zoom and keep a thin and light form factor on the phone was proving to be extremely difficult and well nigh impossible:-

We had been working for a long time (on) optical zooms and had learned the hard way how difficult it is to achieve good performance in smartphones. Their structure is very complex and hard to manufacture.

The answer came to Nokia, like all those genius answers of yore, in the dead of night. What if they could implement a large sensor on a phone, zoom digitally, and throw away the unneeded pixels (by a process called ‘oversampling’) to make an impressively high res image? The rest (about five years of work) is history, so to speak, as AllThingsD says:-

One of the key advantages is it lets you zoom in three or four times in either photos or video and still have a sharp image. The picture of the camera, here, for example, is taken from the same wide shot of the camera and its sensors. In videos, the technology allows one to zoom in close while still maintaining an HD resolution.

Another plus is that the camera uses so called “oversampling” to shrink the image while still making use of the information in the large number of pixels. Nokia said it can create a better 5-megapixel image by using the data in the seven extra pixels to inform which single pixel it uses.

Some sample pictures have been released by Nokia. While they do not hold a candle to the most basic dSLR in the market in terms of picture quality, they definitely beat the hell out of much of the competition.