Tag Archives: OpenGL

Chromium Introduces GPU Rendering, Makes Chrome Better at Rendering Heavy Pages

Recently, a lot of work is being done to introduce GPU rendering into Google Chrome. New additions into web technologies like WebGL and 3D CSS has brought up a need for the web browser to be more CPU intensive. Most definitely, this is undesirable and Google Chrome is taking the right step in offloading the responsibility of rendering these components to the GPU. This will considerably improve the performance and responsiveness of Google Chrome.
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Google Chrome will feature a new GPU process in future versions that will manage all graphics related responsibilities. The GPU process will take in all graphics rendering tasks from the renderer process and send it to OpenGL or Direct3D. This access was not available to the renderer process earlier and neither is it now. However, the GPU process in question is allowed to run in a sandbox and have access to these graphics components of the OS.

This feature will be available for color conversion and scaling of videos. This will lighten the overburdened renderer process and give Google Chrome a smooth performance.

The idea of GPU rendering has just been implemented and the Chromium team wants to develop and advance more in this matter.

(Source)

Khronos Group Releases OpenGL 4.1 with claims of it being better than Direct3D 11

Back in March, when Khronos released OpenGL 4.0, it was a hit and was presumed to be a DirectX 11 killer. I covered the release of OpenGL 4.0 and wrote,

This new version of OpenGL introduces a better support for GPU and an advanced tessalation, which breaks a model into smaller patches or surfaces for better handling and rendering. The OpenGL standard, when adapted to the version 4.0, is presumed to match the qualities of that of DirectX 11, which is the current dominant API for Windows graphics.

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With the release of OpenGL 4.1, Khronos claims that it has surpassed the features of Microsoft’s Direct 3D. OpenGL 4.1 has better error handling and debugging. OpenGL 4.0 needed the Shader program to be compiled at runtime each time a program runs. This can cause significant initialization delay. However, with OpenGL 4.1, the compiled code can be cached for later reuse. The same improvements are present in WebGL, which will make for improved security in web browsing. The debugging features can help developers trace the behavior of any exploit. Further, Microsoft currently does not have any alternative to WebGL and this can make it the standalone champion in this field. (Source)

OpenGL 4.0: Competes With DirectX 11

Khronos, the group behind OpenGL has announced a new version of OpenGL, namely the OpenGL 4.0.
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OpenGL 4.0 aims at simplifying advanced graphics programming through a suite of libraries and APIs.

OpenGL (Open Graphics Library) is a standard specification defining a cross-language, cross-platform API for writing applications that produce 2D and 3D computer graphics. The interface consists of over 250 different function calls which can be used to draw complex three-dimensional scenes from simple primitives.

[Quote Via: Wikipedia ]

This new version of OpenGL introduces a better support for GPU and an advanced tessalation, which breaks a model into smaller patches or surfaces for better handling and rendering. The OpenGL standard, when adapted to the version 4.0, is presumed to match the qualities of that of DirectX 11 which is the current dominant API for Windows graphics.

Another interesting fact is that OpenGL is compatible with another technology called OpenCL which is used to trade off some of the computational load from the CPU to the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU).

Another fork of OpenGL, the OpenGL ES bring similar capabilities for handheld devices. This marks the presence of OpenGL over various platforms. The new OpenGL 4.0 is quite promising in its features and will change the losing scenario of OpenGL.

The announcement of this release was made at the Game Developer Conference on Thursday.

[Via: CNET ]
[Image via: hisdigital ]