WARNING: Amy Winehouse Death Video Scam Spreading on Facebook

As with the past Facebook Scams , the scammers on are all out to exploit situations to make money and scam people. Quite recently, they took advantage of the Oslo bombings and spread a Fake Oslo Bombing Video Scam. Earlier they had exploited Ryan Dunn’s death and spread a scam about Ryan Dunn’s LAST WORDS EXCLUSIVE Video.

RIP Amy Winehouse

Today, another tragic incident happened with singer Amy Winehouse dying under unknown circumstances. However, death or bombings do not deter these scammers from exploiting people and they have started to spread a new scam on Facebook related to Amy Whitehouse death.

amy_winehouse_facebook_scam

The scam is spreading under multiple guises including;

  • Leaked Video!! Amy Winehouse on Crack hours before death. Amy Winehouse getting high on crack just hours before she died
  • Amy Winehouse Death film Leaked Attention: Real Video. Leaked Video of Miss Amy Winehouse Death – Watch Now!

This is definitely pathetic, however, with over 750 million Facebook users it is a very good opportunity for these scammers to exploit users and make money. I am really fed-up of the lack of management by Facebook because they can easily put in solutions which can stop such things. Earlier last year, managed to put a perfect solution for tackling and stopping scams and spam from spreading by introducing their own short URLs t.co.

Using that facility, they could easily block and control spam URLs and stop users from visiting affected sites. Sadly, the amount of scams spreading on Facebook suggests that Facebook is not doing anything about it.

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Here is an article about Avoiding Facebook Likejacking and Clickjacking scams. We have also compiled a list of Most Actively Spreading Scams on Facebook on Facebook for you to look through and avoid. You might also want to use a security application for protecting you from Facebook scams. As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook.

OMG This Sexy Mom Making Thousands of Dollar Working From Home – Facebook Scam

Looks like I am working overnight today with Facebook Scams. I recently posted about three scams today. The first was a girl having a spider living under her skin video followed by the Oslo bombings video scam and the Ex Girlfriend being violated Facebook Scam. Now I have come across a new scam where a sexy mom is making thousands of dollars working from home.

Sexy Mom Thousand Dollars Facebook Scam

The new scam is going with the text saying "This is so real.. OMG This Sexy Mom Making Thousands of dollar only working from home. Now you can also make lot of money like her".

However, this mom is neither sexy, nor does she make thousands of dollars. The people who make the thousands of dollars are the scammers who basically entice you to click on these links and spread them across to your unsuspecting friends.

Seriously, if it was so easy to make money, why would someone share it with you? Also why would a lingerie clad mom show her assets to you when she was making thousands of dollars anyway?

I am really fed-up of these scams on , but there is no stopping them. They will continue to happen and spread throughout the system. After all, not all of the 750 million users on Facebook are good at spotting it, or are they?

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Here is an article about Avoiding Facebook Likejacking and Clickjacking scams. We have also compiled a list of Most Actively Spreading Scams on Facebook on Facebook for you to look through and avoid. You might also want to use a security application for protecting you from Facebook scams. As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook.

OMG Ex-Girlfriend Revenge Video Scam Spreading on Facebook

In a new trend, a new scam is spreading on in multiple ways. There are different updates related to the same thing and they are similar in nature. I have been writing about Facebook Scam for a while today. Previously, I wrote about the Oslo Blasts Security Camera Blast and the Girl Has a Spider Living Inside her Skin scam.

Ex Girlfriend Revenge Facebook Scam

Now a new scam is spreading very rapidly on Facebook and it is going around in various flavors as given below;

  • [Video] OMG! Watch as he gets REVENGE on his Ex Girlfriend. LOL. She could not walk properly for days!
  • OMGF! See what she done after his Ex girlfriend posted This on here wall. I dare you to watch more than 44 second of this video!
  • [Video] OMGG! This is what Happened to his Ex Girlfriend. LOL. She could not walk properly for days!

There are many more variants of the same scam and it is definitely not looking good because the rate at which it is spreading is alarming at best. We urge you to not click on this Facebook spam links and avoid clickjacking scams so that others are not affected by this.

The scam uses the same methods as earlier Facebook video scams and entices a user to click on the link and then directs them to a site where they are asked to fill out surveys before they can view a video. In the end, the user fills up the survey and makes money for the scammers and then dupes the users by not showing any video at all.

With more than 750 million users, Facebook is ripe for pickings and the scammers stand to make a decent amount of money even if they fool 1% of the Facebook users.

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Here is an article about Avoiding Facebook Likejacking and Clickjacking scams. We have also compiled a list of Most Actively Spreading Scams on Facebook on Facebook for you to look through and avoid. You might also want to use a security application for protecting you from Facebook scams. As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook.

[Video] OSLO Security Camera Captures Blast! Facebook Scam

Earlier today, a bomb went off in OSLO killing several innocent people and injuring many. The blasts were carried out by terrorists, but it looks like scammers are out to fool people and make use of the tragic incident as a background.

OSLO Security Camera Blast Facebook Scam

A new Facebook Scam is doing the rounds of Facebook where people are sharing updates saying “[Video] OSLO Security Camera Captures Blast!”. There is no such video available on the internet and the the users are just scamming people and having them click on the links and making money for themselves.

Earlier this month, scammers used the Casey Anthony case and spread scam saying; Leaked Video of Casey Anthony Confessing to Lawyer! Facebook Scam. They also took advantage of Ryan Dunn’s death and spread a scam Ryan Dunn’s LAST WORDS EXCLUSIVE Video.

Additionally, earlier this year, scammers also took advantage of the Osama Bin Laden killing and spread scams like Osama Dead Censored Video Leaked Wikileaks Video, Osama Bin Death Video among other things. The scammers have also not left celebrities like Justin Bieber and Miley Cyrus by spreading scams like OMG Can’t Believe Justin Beiber Did This To A Girl and Warning: Miley Cyrus Sick Video.

Overall, the scammers take advantage of people and their curiosity and spread their scams during a big event or disaster. They don’t care about the sufferings, all they care about is to fool you and make money.

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Here is an article about Avoiding Facebook Likejacking and Clickjacking scams. We have also compiled a list of Most Actively Spreading Scams on Facebook on Facebook for you to look through and avoid. You might also want to use a security application for protecting you from Facebook scams. As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook.

Girl Has a Spider Living Inside of Her Skin! Facebook Scam

A new is rapidly spreading on where users are sharing a video on their timeline with the message "OMG. this is really gross GlRL HAS A SPlDER LlVlNG lNSlDE OF HER SKlN".

OMG Girl Spider in Skin Facebook Spam

The following update is written in all capital letters and has replaced the word "I" with an "L". The video also warns users that it has Mature Content. However, don’t fall for it, since it is nothing but Facebook Spam. The scam is similar to earlier scams like the OMFG: A Girl Raped by Her Teacher in the Classroom and Brother Rapes and Kills His Sister scam.

It tries to generate curiosity in users and then redirects them to a site where they are asked to fill out surveys before they can watch the video. As a user, you might fill out the survey and make money for the scammer, but there will be no video to view in the end.

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Here is an article about Avoiding Facebook Likejacking and Clickjacking scams. We have also compiled a list of Most Actively Spreading Scams on Facebook on Facebook for you to look through and avoid.  You might also want to use a security application for protecting you from Facebook scams. As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook.

Anonymous & LulzSec Tell FBI To Go Fish

Over the past couple of days the FBI has been making arrests in and around New York City with regards to the PayPal breach carried out by Anonymous back in December 2010. Over 14 people were arrested on Tuesday and several more searches are underway.

Back in December 2010, Anonymous had attacked PayPal because they had stopped or closed down accounts of . The shutdown was done because of the leak of classified U.S. documents by Wikileaks. After the PayPal breach, Anonymous continued destructing several other websites including those of MasterCard and Visa.

Also Read: Editorial: LulzSec, AntiSec and Why the Internet is a Sadder Place Now

The FBI had been on trail of suspects since a long time, but they final managed to make some arrests after almost 8 months. However, the arrests have hardly shaken Anonymous and the recently notorious LulzSec, who have grown in popularity over the past few months and had also recently attacked Rupert Murdoch’s newspapers because of the phone hacking scandal.

In a open letter to the FBI, Anonymous and LulzSec have basically asked the FBI to F*** Off. The response came after the deputy assistant FBI director Steven Chabinsky gave the following statement to NPR;

"We want to send a message that chaos on the Internet is unacceptable,  [even if] hackers can be believed to have social causes, it’s entirely  unacceptable to break into websites and commit unlawful acts."

The hacktivists replied to this message by arguing that Governments are lying to their citizens and trying to keep them into control and curtailing their freedom. Along with that, Corporations and lobbyists are conspiring with the Governments while collecting billions in funds for federal contracts.

They have also clearly stated that the "governments and corporations are their enemy" and they will continue to fight them. Additionally, Anonymous and LulzSec seem to have no fear in this world anymore and are claiming to be unstoppable;

We are not scared any more. Your threats to arrest us are meaningless to us as you cannot arrest an idea. Any attempt to do so will make your citizens more angry until they will roar in one gigantic choir. It is our mission to help these people and there is nothing – absolutely nothing – you can possibly to do make us stop.

This is definitely a direct attack on the FBI and their security and will ensure a cat-and-mouse game between the government and the hacktivists. It is definitely not the end and the authorities will have to fight a painful battle on the internet against people they might never be able to catch.

Also Read: LulzSec Takes Down CIA.gov Website, Forwards Prank Calls to FBI

The drama is yet to unfold. The next few months or years will show how this will pan out and who will win the battle. In the meantime, you can read the entire Anonymous & Lulz Security Statement below:

Hello thar FBI and international law authorities,

We recently stumbled across the following article with amazement and a certain amount of amusement:

http://www.npr.org/2011/07/20/138555799/fbi-arrests-alleged-anonymous-hackers

The statements made by deputy assistant FBI director Steve Chabinsky in this article clearly seem to be directed at Anonymous and Lulz Security, and we are happy to provide you with a response.

You state:

  "We want to send a message that chaos on the Internet is unacceptable,   [even if] hackers can be believed to have social causes, it’s entirely   unacceptable to break into websites and commit unlawful acts."

Now let us be clear here, Mr. Chabinsky, while we understand that you and your colleagues may find breaking into websites unacceptable, let us tell you what WE find unacceptable:

* Governments lying to their citizens and inducing fear and terror to keep them in control by dismantling their freedom piece by piece.

* Corporations aiding and conspiring with said governments while taking advantage at the same time by collecting billions of funds for federal contracts we all know they can’t fulfil.

* Lobby conglomerates who only follow their agenda to push the profits higher, while at the same time being deeply involved in governments around the world with the only goal to infiltrate and corrupt them enough so the status quo will never change.

These governments and corporations are our enemy. And we will continue to fight them, with all methods we have at our disposal, and that certainly includes breaking into their websites and exposing their lies.

We are not scared any more. Your threats to arrest us are meaningless to  us as you cannot arrest an idea. Any attempt to do so will make your citizens more angry until they will roar in one gigantic choir. It is our mission to help these people and there is nothing – absolutely nothing – you can possibly to do make us stop.

  "The Internet has become so important to so many people that we have to ensure that the World Wide Web does not become the Wild Wild West."

Let me ask you, good sir, when was the Internet not the Wild Wild West? Do you really believe you were in control of it at any point? You were not.

That does not mean that everyone behaves like an outlaw. You see, most people do not behave like bandits if they have no reason to. We become bandits on the Internet because you have forced our hand. The Anonymous bitchslap rings
through your ears like hacktivism movements of the 90s. We’re back – and we’re not going anywhere. Expect us.

Redditor Receives Phishing Email, Hacks the Scammer, and Reports Him

While surfing through Reddit this morning, I stumbled across an interesting submission from a Redditor going by the username “Tomble”. Apparently, Tomble received a standard PayPal phishing mail demanding personal information for “verification purposes”. However, unlike most of us, who would simply report it as a phishing attempt and be done with it, Tomble decided to do some snooping around.

Tomble noticed that the domain name had a structure similar to “http://www.example.net/~joe”, which indicated that the username for that domain’s control panel as well as ftp account was probably ‘joe’. He then decided to try his luck by assuming that the ftp address will be similar to the domain name. His guess turned out to be correct. He still didn’t know the ftp password. However, the domain indicated that this particular webspace was provided by an ISP. Hoping against hope that the webmaster hadn’t changed the default password, which is often just ‘password’, he entered ‘password’ as the ftp password. Amazingly, it worked, and Tomble managed to break into the server.

The website actually belonged to some clueless gentleman who probably had nothing to do with the scammer. The scammer probably managed to break into the server in the same way Tomble did, and planted a few PHP scripts to collect PayPal authentication information.

Tomble found all of this information stored in a single text file. So far, three gullible PayPal users had fallen for this scam. He immediately notified the concerned ISP. However, he didn’t receive any immediate response. On the other hand, two more users had fallen victim within the next thirty minutes.

Tomble now decided to intervene. He made a few modifications to the phishing website (see screenshot below). All of the victims, with the exception of one guy from Thailand, had left their phone numbers for verification purposes. Tomble emailed the Thai guy, and called up the other four with the following helpful suggestion.

Hi, my name’s Tomble, this might sound weird but I received a scam email pretending to be from PayPal this morning. I was able to follow it back and discovered your contact information there. You should contact your bank and let them know your credit card has been compromised, so they can protect you from fraudulent charges.

Scammer-Gets-Scammed

While one of the victims was initially suspicious, all of them eventually realized that Tomble was one of the good guys. In one case, he had to leave a message with the wife of the victim, who will probably find himself in some minor domestic trouble due to his gullibility.

It’s unfortunate that even today people are falling for phishing scams and Nigerian scams. Significantly, all of the victims were between the ages 39 and 60. While the younger ‘cyber-generation’ is by and large aware of the threats they face online, many from the older generations still need to be educated. Do you bit today, and educate your parents and grandparents about online security. As our fine Australian friend, Tomble, has shown, a little effort can go a long way.

Find out if Your Account Was Compromised and Leaked in Recent Hacks

For the past month or so, a group called Lulzsec has been causing havoc on the internet. They have been hacking servers and leaking usernames and passwords on the internet.

Should I Change My Password

Earlier today, Groupon India was hacked too, however, it is not known as to who was behind the hack. As a user, it is definitely difficult to find out if your account has been compromised or not. However, a new website called "Should I change My Password" is allowing users to search the database of leaked accounts to see if your account has been compromised.

Also Read: Editorial: LulzSec, AntiSec and Why the Internet is a Sadder Place Now

All you need to do is to enter the email address for your account and click on the "Check it!" button. It will then search the database that have been released by hackers to the public and see if your email address exists in it.

I would want to further add that regardless of whether your email was leaked or not, update your password immediately. It takes only few minutes and you can easily create strong passwords or use tools to generate strong passwords.

(via LH)

Get Free 2000 Facebook Credits totally FREE Facebook Scam

It’s a lovely Sunday out here in the real world, but the online world is full of shenanigans. While drooling over what my friends are doing on Facebook, I came across something which I love to do, that something is nothing but my love for advising people about technology.

Earlier today, the self proclaimed hackers LulzSec decided to hang their boots (Read: Editorial: LulzSec, AntiSec and Why the Internet is a Sadder Place Now). However, scammers are still far off from doing that.

A new Facebook Scam is underway where an app is promising that you can get 2000 Facebook Credits for free (remember the Free Cityville coins Scam?). Facebook Credits are virtual currency on Facebook which can be used to buy virtual goods on Facebook for games like Farmville and more. These credits are not free and can be acquired by paying for them.

Facebook Credits

Facebook Credits can be purchased by visiting your Account tab and then selecting the Payments tab. You can buy 50 credits for $5 and so on. Now a new scam is doing the rounds of Facebook where the app says that they will give you 2000 Facebook Credits for free. If you were to purchase 2000 credits on Facebook, you would have to pay $200. Now the offer from the scammer is definitely pretty enticing considering that you would be saving $200 upfront.

Pretty neat right? Well no, the offer is a big scam. After all, giving $200 to each of Facebook’s 700 million users would cost a whooping $14 billion. The people claim that they would do it only for the first 1000 visitors, but what the heck, I want my pie. and I know more than 1000 users want it too.

Now who in their sane mind would want to spill out that kind of money for free? A lunatic right? Well you are wrong, it is a Facebook scammer.

Facebook Credits Scam

If you do fall for the scam and click on the link, you might see a page similar to the screenshot above. The website in question is not hosted on Facebook itself, but it disguises itself to look like that. The website asks you to perform few steps in order to get 2000 free credits. One of the task involves sharing the page in question with a message like;

Get your FREE 2000 FACEBOOK CREDITS! NO SCAM NO surveys NO  waste of time no task its totally FREE this promo is available for the  first 1000 persons only… CHECK IT OUT ENJOY..i got mine and it works  get yours here [site redacted]

Additionally, you will have to like the site. While you are performing the above steps, the site pretends to be checking the status of your actions. Well, it will keep doing that no matter what you do. Finally, after you have shared the scam with your friends (and probably managed to entice them too) you can click on the button to claim your "FREE 2000 Facebook Credits".

Facebook Credits Scam Content Locked

When you click that button shouldn’t you be getting your so called FREE 2000 Facebook Credits? Well, you should, but you are redirected to a site which will tell you that the content is locked and "you are just one step away from unlocking the content of the site by performing another action". Wait, didn’t you already do that? Well, there you go. Now you have to either customize your Facebook profile or figure out "How Smart Are You Really?" Wait, isn’t this question ironic?

Once you perform the steps to cross the final hurdle, all you are left is with NOTHING. The spammer on the other hand just managed to make a few bucks by fooling you into taking a survey or performing a task? Phew, all in a day’s work.

As I have repeated numerous times in the past, please do not get fooled by these freebies. They will waste your time and make money for those spammers who will then continue to devise new tactics to continue fooling you.

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams. We also have a list of actively spreading scams on Facebook for you to look through and avoid.

MyPageKeeper Promises to Protect You from Facebook Scams

Facebook scams are beginning to become a real nuisance. Most of them don’t do much real damage, other than causing some embarrassment, but that doesn’t mean that they aren’t annoying. Most scams simply blast the same message that fooled you to all your friends, which helps them in going viral. Some of them might also ask you to fill surveys that profit the scammer. However, only a very few try to distribute malware or spread phishing campaigns.

What makes these scams so effective is the fact that they are fairly hard to spot. Most people implicitly trust anything posted on their wall by their friends. Moreover, it is often hard for people to resist clicking on links promising leaked videos of Bin Laden’s death or the last words of a recently dead celebrity. Facebook scams prey on people’s gullibility and curiosity to get the better of them.

A new Facebook app called MyPageKeeper promises to protect you from Facebook scams. It does so by monitoring your news feed, wall posts, and installed apps. It doesn’t say exactly how it detects a piece of content as spam, but it’s most likely that MyPageKeeper is simply database driven.

MyPageKeeper

Two Ph.D. students in computer science at the Bourns College of Engineering teamed up with StopTheHacker, a web protection service founded in 2009 by Anirban Banerjee, who received his Ph.D. in 2008 from UC Riverside, and Michalis Faloutsos, a professor of computer science and engineering at the university, to create MyPageKeeper.

“Facebook is the new web,said Rahman. It provides a fertile ground to spread malware, since users trust links and posts that are seemingly from their friends. Hackers have realized this, and they have started using it to distribute malware and conduct identity theft.

MyPageKeeper is free to use, and getting started is as simple as installing the Facebook application. It’s designed to work automatically, and proactively. Once you enable it, you don’t need to tinker with it further. However, if you like to tinker with things, then there are a few options that you can tweak. You can specify how aggressive you want MyPageKeeper to be. Obviously, being more aggressive runs the risk of generating more false positives. You can also change how you want the app to notify you about malicious content spotted in your profile.

MyPageKeeper-Settings

Faloutsos, who has studied web security for 15 years, believes web security is following the same trajectory as desktop security. Ten years back, people weren’t serious about desktop security, but now almost everyone has an antimalware product installed on their system. Today, most people don’t realize the importance of staying cautious on the web, but in the coming years, Faloutsos believes that everyone will realize the importance of web security. People are educated about e-mail spam,says Faloutsos. But, now there is an implicit trust, almost validation, when someone sees a post from a friend on Facebook.

You can install this Facebook application from MyPageKeeper.org.

[Hat tip to @sreeyesh for recommending this app]