Tutorial: Use Word 2013 to Edit Your Blog

Office 2013 sports some pretty nifty features. One them is the ability to edit your blog directly using Word 2013. In this tutorial, I will show you how you can create a short blog post, insert embedded video, and save it as a draft on your WordPress website. Let’s get Started!

Word 2013 Splash Screen

When you first open Word 2013, you are presented with some gorgeous templates to help you get started. Pictured below, you can see that I am choosing the template called “Blog post”.

Blog Template
Select the Blog Template to get started.

The first time you open the “Blog post” template, it will ask you information about your blog’s URL, as well as username and password. Once you get that out of the way, you can start typing as I have below. Notice that I have typed “A Day at the Races” in the title section of the blog post. Below that you can see that I am typing about an experience I had with my son that weekend. You will also notice that some of the text is underlined in blue. This denotes that I have made that text a hyperlink. All I had to do was highlight the text and click the button at the top that looks like a little globe and is labeled “Hyperlink”. Things were moving along pretty smoothly until I decided I wanted to use this great new feature that Word 2013 is touting, which is the ability to embed videos. However, when I clicked the “Insert” tab, it was nowhere to be found, hence the giant red question mark I put in the picture.

Missing Embed
Notice we’re missing the embed video button.

Well, I decided to do a little digging. It hadn’t been that long ago that I did a tutorial on how to add buttons to the quick access toolbar in 2010, and fortunately Word 2013 sports that bar as well. If you look at the picture below, you will see where I clicked the downward pointing arrow on the quick access toolbar. I then selected “More Commands” from the bottom of the menu.

Quick Access Toolbar
Add Commands to Quick Access Toolbar

Next, I knew that I wanted to insert a video. By default, the “Popular Commands” category is chosen in the selection area. I clicked the dropdown arrow and chose the “Insert Tab” category because I suspected this is where I would find the insert video command I was looking for.

Insert Tab
Insert Tab

Under the “Insert Tab” heading was listed the option “Online Video”. I selected that video, clicked the “Add” button to move it to the right column of the dialog box. Lastly, I clicked OK at the bottom.

Now, I was in business. Circled in the picture below, you can see the “Online Video” button on the quick access toolbar. I clicked that and it opened the dialog box you see below. I simply had to copy the embed code from my YouTube video and paste it into the box to the right of the field that says “From a Video Embed Code”. You will also see circled in red to the right, the button that you need to click to insert the video.

Embed Video
Embed Video

Pictured below, you can now see I have my YouTube video embedded in the body of my blog post. To the right of that, you see a little box that says “Layout Options”. This is where you make the video box bigger and configure how it aligns with the text.

Layout Options
Layout Options

The last thing I want to do is save this post as a draft on my main blog so I can see how well it transfers over. I click on the “Blog Post” tab, then under the “Publish” button I click the downward pointing arrow, and select “Publish as Draft”. The reason I am doing it as a draft is so I can make final edits on my blog host.

Save As Draft
Save as Draft

If you look in the image below, you can see where my post was successfully published to my WordPress blog. Well, almost everything successfully published. Unfortunately, I found a nice little bug in this feature. The video didn’t actually transfer. For some reason, during the act of publishing, my video was converted into a PNG file. So basically, it’s now just a picture. This may explain why the insert video link was missing in the blog template to begin with, but I feel like this is a big flop if Microsoft didn’t consider the fact that some would want to publish videos to their blogs. Be mindful however, that the video works great embedded in the Word document. It just didn’t carry over.

WordPress Screenshot

I sent a note to Microsoft regarding the bug, but have yet to hear back. I will be sure to update if I do hear from Microsoft. You can notify Microsoft of bugs in any of the Office 2013 Consumer Preview apps by clicking the frown face in the upper right corner of the programs. Honestly, I like the ability that Microsoft Word 2013 gives me in the blog template. Unfortunately, it’s not perfect.

Office 2013 Review

Microsoft recently announced the newest addition to its family of office products called Office 2013. At the moment, it is being made available as a “Consumer Preview” and can be downloaded for free (see: Office 2013 screenshot tour). I took a shot at downloading the preview and would like to share my thoughts on it so far.

Ease of Download and Installation

I found the download and installation process to be extremely easy. Pictured below, you can see what the Consumer Preview website looks like when you go to download it. All you have to do is click sign up and it will take you through the steps. Office 2013 is all designed around the Microsoft ID so you will have to use an existing login like your Hotmail account, or create a new one to get the download. Keep in mind that only users with Windows 7 and Windows 8 can download Office 2013. The installation was really quick. I was up and using Word in less than 10 minutes.

Office 2013

 

User Interface

The user interface is visually stunning. I give them credit for not veering too far away from the ribbon interface that we’re all used to, but they did incorporate the Metro UI look which will be the standard in all of Microsoft’s Windows 8 products. Pictured below, you can see what the Excel 2013 window looks like. If you look in the top right corner you will see your online Microsoft profile, an ever present reminder that with Office 2013 you are always connected. You can also put Office 2013 in “Touch Mode” to optimize it for use with tablets and touch screen PC’s.

Excel User Interface

Features and Functionality

I have a decent PC, but it certainly isn’t cutting edge. I am running a Windows 7 OS with an Intel i5 processor. That being said, I find Office 2013 to be extremely responsive. For instance, when I clicked Microsoft Publisher 2013, it took 3 seconds to be up and running on my screen. That was the first time too! Whatever they did to take the bloat out of the startup experience, it’s a good thing.

As far as features go, there are a few new ones worth mentioning, and I think they are good additions to the Office family. The first one I will mention is Microsoft Word’s ability to open and edit PDF files. This works very well. If you look at the screenshot below, you will see that my PDF resume shows up as an available document in the Word dialog box. I was able to open and edit a PDF with ease. It was as smooth as silk.

Word Opens PDF

Excel 2013 sports a new feature called “Flash Fill” which I think is really useful. If you look below, you can see an example where someone wanted to split first and last names. In column B they began typing a first name then hit ctrl+E and the “Flash Fill” Feature knows the pattern that you want all of the first names from column A. This is a very useful feature and will save time.

Excel Flash Fill

The last thing I want to mention is the availability of the cloud. All of your files can follow you around if you take advantage of Microsoft’s Skydrive with Office 2013. You can use Office 2013 with up to 5 different devices. This also means that you can access all your files from those devices by saving them to you Skydrive. It really shows up just like any other folder would in your Office programs. Saving to it is a breeze.

Bottom Line

Everything that I have seen of Microsoft Office 2013 so far is a 5 star rating in my opinion. However, because they have only made this available to Windows 7 and 8 users, I am rating it with 4 stars. I am sure there may be technical reasons behind this decision, but I suspect that it is mostly a financial one. Office 2013 is worth the look and if you’re still using 2003, then I would definitely recommend it for the features and the speed. Keep checking back with us because I will be adding tutorials very soon so you can see more of the great features this new Office 2013 provides. You may also want to read some of the other great articles which go into more detail about the new features of Office 2013 at http://techie-buzz.com/tag/office-2013/.

Office 2013 Preview Screenshot Tour

Microsoft just announced the consumer preview of Office 2013/Office 365 (Download Office 2013 Consumer Preview) which includes a new metro interface and also several other interesting new features and changes which you can read about in our Office 2013 features post.

While Office 2013 is designed keeping and the new Metro UI, that Microsoft has been using for most of its products, in mind, it will also work on and . However, if you are someone like me,  you might now like the Metro interface on Windows 7.

I was able to download the Office 2013 preview and use it for an hour or so. Office 2013 preview has Word 2013, PowerPoint 2013, Excel 2013, Outlook 2013, OneNote 2013, Access 2013 and Publisher 2013 included in the bundle. While not much has changed since the earlier announcement of Office 15, here is a screenshot tour of the new Office 2013.

New Splash Screens

All Office 2013 products sport a new splash screen which goes follows the standards of the Metro UI.

PowerPoint 2013 Splash Screen Outlook 2013 Splash Screen

OneNote 2013 Splash Screen Excel 2013 Splash Screen

Word 2013 Splash Screen

Download Office 2013 Consumer Preview

Steve Ballmer is currently announcing the Office 2013 consumer preview live, however, the links to download the consumer preview of Office 2013 links are already available online.

Office 2013 will be customized heavily to work with Windows 8 but will also work on other Windows versions. Office 2013 will also be touch screen friendly and will provide you with features like pinch and zoom among others. Office 2013 will allow users to use a stylus to create content, take notes and access other features, while also allowing you to create hand-written emails.

Office 2013 will be included on ARM-based Windows 8 devices including Microsoft Surface. Additionally, Office 2013 will also tightly integrate with SkyDrive and save your documents in the cloud by default. It will also have social features and integrate with Yammer, which Microsoft recently purchased.

More features of Microsoft are available on this page. We will be doing a detailed review and analysis of today’s announcement as well as a feature description of Office 2013.

Microsoft has opened up the downloads for the consumer preview of Office 2013 and can be downloaded from http://www.microsoft.com/office/preview/en. Please note that you will have to sign in using your Hotmail account before you can download the consumer preview of Office 2013/Office 365 Home Preview.

Update: New Features in Office 2013

Microsoft Announcement Will Be Streamed Online

Microsoft will be making an announcement later today at 12PM Pacific/12ET about some new product(s). The announcement will be made by Steve Ballmer which would mean that Microsoft is bound to announce something major.

Microsoft Press Event Ballmer

As rumors suggest, the announcement could be related to the newer version of Office; Office 15 which Microsoft has been working on for a while. Microsoft is also set to release to consumers later this year, so it makes sense that they would also release a refresh for Office along with the new OS.

Office 15 will sport the new Metro look which has become the signature for Microsoft products of late and will more likely than not be ported to every future Microsoft product.

If you are interested in watching Steve Ballmer’s announcement live, you can do so by visiting the live webcast at http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/news/ which will be available in Chinese, English, French, German, Italian, Korean, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. You can start viewing the live stream at http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/news/presskits/office/liveevent.aspx

Read More:

We’ll be posting more news about the event as it happens. So stay tuned for future updates right here.

New Microsoft Office Logo Surfaces

Apple’s WWDC announcements weren’t the only fun things in consumer tech today. Before Tim Cook took stage, Damaster writing for LiveSide leaked the new logo for Microsoft Office. Since everything in Microsoft’s world is going Metro, the Office logo is getting the same treatment. Like the Windows 8 logo, the new Office logo will face the left and is quite different from the previous logo—a straightened single square, instead of intertwined four, with a tapering edge.

Damaster also confirmed the Metro UI for Office Web Apps to complement the new Hotmail UI. If Hotmail and Office Web Apps are being Metro-fied, we should expect SkyDrive getting a new interface. A few screenshots to compare the Metro UI as it has progressed:

Word Office 15 Technical Preview (courtesy Paul Thurrott)

Word in Office 15 Beta (courtesy Paul Thurrott)

Word in Office Web Apps

We will keep you updated about the Office 15 Beta release and what’s in it.

Office 15: Upcoming Features We Know

 

At the Windows 8 Consumer Preview launch event, Microsoft talked about their next Office version, codenamed Office 15. Steven Sinofsky gave us a preview of the product and while the company isn’t talking about the product just yet, a limited test trial is underway. Tom Warren at The Verge has gathered a lot of information about the upcoming Office suite and here’s a list of features we know so far:

  • Bundled Metro versions of Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and OneNote on WOA (Windows on ARM) devices
  • Touch Mode for the Office suite
  • Reading Mode in Word (with Resume Reading function that bookmarks where you were last time on the document)
  • Object Zoom (click to zoom into images, charts etc.)
  • Expand and Collapse (hide contents of a paragraph)
  • Insert pictures from Facebook, Flickr
  • Embed and view videos from within Word
  • Open and read PDF like Word files (at least that’s what I understand from Tom’s post)
  • Weather bar in Outlook
  • Broadcast Word documents online (like PowerPoint presentations in Office 2010)
  • Quick Analysis Lens for visualizing data
  • Flash Fill to work with spreadsheets formatting
  • Better Excel and PowerPoint love-making while working with charts
  • Peeks—quick look at schedule, tasks, and contacts
  • Auto updating and viewing of Visio and Excel files within a OneNote notebook
To some these might appear as inconsequential additions, but features like the weather bar, better collaboration, enhancements in working with media, and the touch interface are additions that the Office suite needs. Bundling Office 15 with WOA is probably the single best decision made by Microsoft to sell their tablets.

Office 15 Has A Touch Mode Toggle

One of the biggest questions surrounding Office 15 right now has to do with just how touch-friendly it will be on ARM devices. We know they aren’t producing a proper Windows 8 Metro App; Microsoft confirmed in an official Building Windows 8 blog post that this is the case, and that we will instead receive a mode of sorts that is “significantly architected” for touch.

ZDNet’s Mary-Jo Foley received a screenshot from a source — likely the same one that supplied The Verge with those Office 15 Technical Preview screenshots — revealing a button that seems to toggle a “touch mode”. According to Mary-Jo’s source, clicking the button in the build as of right now does nothing. It is, of course, an early build, so it’s likely that the touch mode still needs more time in the oven.

That being said, since we don’t know what it does exactly, it’s still hard to determine just how touch-friendly this mode will be. Perhaps, despite not having a proper Metro app, legacy Office will still pack a touch-friendly UI in its pockets, ready to perform metamorphosis on command. I think it’s safe to assume that this mode will be automatically enabled on a Windows on ARM device.

According to MJF’s sources, Microsoft hopes to RTM Office 15 by late 2012. Come the time around the beta, we can likely expect to get a better glimpse of the touch alter-ego in Office 15.

New Office 15 Technical Preview Screenshots Surface

In reaching the Technical Preview stage of development — during which a build is fed to third-party OEMs and partners for evaluation purposes — information leaks are imminent. Tom Warren over at The Verge managed to get his hands on screenshots of the Technical Preview build, giving us an early glimpse of what the software giant is planning for what is now its greatest source of operating income.

Thus far, there aren’t any colossal, noteworthy changes. Understandable, considering that we’re still at an early stage of development where UI changes or features are fairly sparse. One noteworthy change to Office 15 is that now, the ribbon is hidden by default. It’s still there, and can be brought back from hiding by clicking on a “pin” icon, but it’s an interesting design choice. Perhaps they did so to provide the user with more screen estate for the document they’re working on; the ribbon is somewhat hefty.

One new Office 15 feature is the ability to broadcast documents online. Expanding on the “Broadcast Slide Show” feature in Powerpoint 2010, this functionality has been brought to the other Office applications. Basically, you broadcast documents by sharing them online through Windows Live.

UI-wise, by far the biggest change is with Outlook. There, a dash of Metro can be found, as there’s a navigation bar at the bottom that allows you to switch between “Mail, Calendar, People, and Tasks”.

Ultimately, we’ll have to wait until the first beta rolls around to see any noteworthy changes. I’m curious to see what Microsoft are doing to “architect” Office for touch on Windows on ARM. To see the full gallery of Office 15 screenshots, head on over to Tom’s post.

Microsoft’s Business Division Overtakes Windows as Company’s Primary Cash Cow; Why No Office Metro App?

On yesterday’s Business Insider chart of the day, an interesting trend was pointed out: Microsoft’s Business Division has once again overtaken Windows as the main source of Microsoft’s operating income.

As Business Insider noted in a previous opinion piece, Microsoft should work to cultivate this income source even more by releasing versions of Office on iOS and Android devices. It’s worth noting though that, despite the fair chance of profitability that exists on the aforementioned platforms, it would be unfortunate to see Microsoft launching proper iOS and Android versions of Office without developing a proper Windows 8 Metro suite.

Revisiting Sinofsky’s colossal, roughly 8,600 word post on Windows on ARM (WOA), Office was touched on and even briefly shown off. It was in this post where Microsoft confirmed that, on Windows 8, the next version of Office will remain a legacy app. It will, however, be “significantly architected” for touch. Without delving into the reasons as to why it’s impossible for any application that’s built for the legacy desktop can be optimized for touch, the bigger point here is that a team within Microsoft isn’t even embracing Metro and Windows 8.

There’s no excuse for not creating a proper Metro app. Whatever the reason behind it is, it looks bad. People will speculate that the Office team wanted to hedge their bets with Windows 8 by not investing too much resources in it, and the last thing that something as risky as Windows 8 needs is an absence of faith from what is, as of now, Microsoft’s largest source of operating income.

It was quite accurately described in the original BI post that the relationship between Windows and Office is symbiotic. Office is betraying the relationship here.