Tag Archives: NoDo

Windows Phone Updates Are Now Completely Opaque

Windows Phone Opaque

Windows Phone behind a frosted glass

After the “NoDo” update mess, the Windows Phone engineering team took a major u-turn and did several things right. They became more transparent by having a blog and a site dedicated to providing the latest status of a certain update by carrier, by phone model, by country/geography. Secondly, they got together with the OEMs and the carriers to do a coordinated deployment of the first major update, Windows Phone 7.5 (codename Mango).

So, why do I say they have become opaque? This afternoon, over at the Windows Blog, Eric Hautala, General Manager of Customer Experience Engineering announced that going forward they are going to discontinue the constant, weekly updates they were putting out on the blog. Instead, they will provide news of updates on the main Windows Phone blog. Also, that this update (and presumably others, going forward) is going to be up to the carriers to request from Microsoft and provide to end users.

The update, available to all carriers that request it, is part of our ongoing maintenance of Windows Phone

What? The carriers have to request the update? Why would they? If they request the update, they’d have to run a long test cycle to validate the update. Then they’d have to roll it out to their users. It takes a lot of engineering effort on the part of the carriers to undertake these tests. Why would they, unless it is a huge issue like a major security vulnerability or if phones are becoming useless (“bricked”)? Absolutely no reason.

Microsoft has to push the carriers (and OEMs) to push the updates to the phones that are impacted. Sometimes not all phones on all carriers are impacted, but instead of relying on the carriers to request the update, Microsoft should be the one pushing the carriers to force the updates to the users. Unfortunately, unlike Apple, which treats you and I as their customers, Microsoft treats the carriers as their customers. That is not to say that the end customer is irrelevant to Microsoft, but clearly, the customers that pay Microsoft are the carriers and the OEMs.

I have mocked Android before, for being extremely slow in updating phones, but in that case at least, Google has admittedly washed their hands off the entire process by making Android free to use. Their argument could very well be that they have no control over the OEMs and therefore, it is futile to push the carriers who may have to do even longer testing because of the large variety of Android phones that are available. In Microsoft’s case though, all OEMs are known because it is a not a free license. The updates could be coordinated, as we saw in the case of “Mango”, among the various OEMs and carriers. That they have made a conscious decision not to mandate the carriers, shows that behind the scenes, something has changed politically which has led to this decision.

I am disappointed at these moves: first, the move to let the carriers request the update, but second and more importantly, the lack of the detailed communication regarding various updates, going forward. So, going forward, it will not only be unclear if you will receive the update, but also, you won’t know how far along your specific carrier is with the update deployment.

I can only imagine that the transparency did not go down well with Microsoft’s partners since it clearly exposed the OEMs (Samsung in particular) and carriers (Telefonica is an example) which were holding up the updates. However, the end user is the one who gets the short end of the stick here – not because they don’t receive the update, most normal customers don’t even care – mostly because their phone experience suffers. In the most recent update, there is an annoying, oft-occurring bug which has been fixed (“disappearing keyboard”). If AT&T does not pick it up and push the update out in the next few weeks, this Windows Phone user will definitely start watching the next iPhone rumors more closely.

AT&T Rolls Out The WP7 NoDo Update For The Samsung Focus

Microsoft started rolling out the NoDo update bringing the much awaited copy & paste feature to all WP7 handsets, at the end of the last month.

However, some carriers decided to delay the release of the NoDo update for WP7 based handsets including AT&T.

Nevertheless, AT&T has finally started rolling out the NoDo update for the Samsung Focus and the LG Quantum. The HTC Surround will get its NoDo update sometime in May, due to some software issues.

Samsung_Focus

Samsung has also taken this opportunity to roll out a firmware update for the Focus. The new firmware update incorporates some useful changes and bug fixes.

The capacitive buttons on the Focus are temporarily disabled, if an app is open and a   user drags his finger from the screen to the buttons. This will definitely be appreciated by all Focus owners, and will help in reducing all those accidental touches. No more going back to the previous screen, while playing Fruit Ninja!

Another nifty change brought by this firmware is the anti-shake setting being enabled by default for the Camera. Most users don’t really bother to check out the camera settings before clicking a snap, and this small change will definitely come in handy for them.

WP7 is a closed OS, still users need to wait for sometime before they can update their handset to the latest version of the OS.   So much for being a closed OS!

Via WPCentral

Windows Phone 7 ‘NoDo’ Update Is Ready

The long awaited update for Windows Phone 7 is finally ready and will slowly be trickling out to handsets during the week. NoDo’ is the internal name (supposedly in jest of Google’s Donutmoniker) for the update and it brings along the much anticipated copy and paste feature, improved Marketplace searching and better Facebook contact integration. Although this update was first estimated to be available early February, Microsoft delayed to ensure compatibility and functionality for all handsets. Recent updates for Windows Phone 7 handsets were met with some troubles for Samsung devices and again were subsequently held off from public accessibility.

Microsoft has updated their Windows Phone 7 update history page to include the updates slated for March. The version numbering is bumped from 7.0.7008.0 to 7.0.7390.0 and a consumer-friendly changelog is present. In addition to core usability updates many other changes have been made, such as

    • Faster apps and games. Nobody likes to wait. That’s why we’ve whittled down the time it takes for apps and games to start up and resume. It’s all part of our focus on getting you to the things you love, easier and faster.

    • Other Marketplace improvements. We’ve improved the stability of Marketplace while you download apps.

    • Wi-Fi improvements. We now display your phone’s Media Access Control (MAC) address in Settings. (You might need this info if you try to connect to a Wi-Fi network that uses MAC address filtering.

    • Outlook improvements. We’ve improved the experience of viewing iPhone photo attachments you receive from a non-Exchange-based email account (such as a Google Mail, Hotmail, or Yahoo! Mail account), using the Global Address List (GAL) when connecting to Exchange Server 2003 using Exchange ActiveSync, and working with email display names that contain brackets (for example, "David Alexander [Contoso]").

    • Messaging improvements. We’ve improved the experience of receiving Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) messages if your phone uses a PIN-locked SIM.

    • Camera improvements. We’ve improved the stability of switching between camera and video modes.

    • Audio improvements. We’ve improved the experience of using a Bluetooth headset to make calls when you’re playing music or videos.

    • Other performance improvements. This month’s update also includes software from several phone manufacturers that improves the performance of specific models. Naturally, if you don’t have one of the affected models, we won’t install this portion of the update on your phone.

Since Windows Phone 7 lacks the integrated carrier customizations that many other platforms allow, Microsoft should have an easy time rolling out updates to all handsets in a timely fashion. Hopefully the days of market and localization-based update pushing are over and this can usher in a fast, seamless and user-friendly method of updating smartphones. Unfortunately, it does appear that you will need to connect your device to a computer in order to update through the Zune suite no OTA at this time.

HTC HD7 WP7 ‘NoDo’ Update Leaks!

Yesterday, we reported that the WP7 NoDo update for the HTC Mozart leaked on the Internet. Today, a new RUU/ROM containing the NoDo update for the HD7 has surfaced over at XDA-Developers forum.

Microsoft will be releasing the NoDo update for all the WP7 handsets in the next couple of weeks. The NoDo update for WP7 will bring with it copy and paste functionality along with some other new features. The apps and games loading time have also been drastically reduced.

HTC_HD7

The ROM is apparently the final build, which will soon be officially released by Microsoft. The ROM is meant only for unbranded, generic HD7 handsets. Users who have a carrier branded version, can flash this ROM by converting their microSD card into a gold card.

HD7 owners who flashed this ROM reported improved overall performance and some sound improvements as well. HTC HD7 owners, who are interested in flashing the leaked ROM/RUU on their phone, can download it from here.

HTC Mozart Gets Copy And Paste, Unofficially!

When Microsoft launched its next generation mobile OS WP7, the company was criticized for leaving out many basic features like copy-paste, USB mount storage support etc.

In February at MWC, Microsoft announced that WP7 will get multi-tasking and copy-paste and a host of new features by the end of 2011. The company stated that the copy-paste feature will be coming to all WP7 handsets by March via the NoDo update.

HTC_Mozart

Now, March has just begun and some folks over at XDA-Developers have found a leaked ROM for the HTC Mozart. The ROM looks like an official one and brings copy and paste functionality along with speed improvements to the handset. The WP7 build included in this ROM is 7355-89.

Mozart owners should keep in mind that flashing this ROM on their handset will wipe it clean from all data. The ROM is a generic one, so all carrier branding will be removed as well. Brave Mozart owners who flashed this ROM on their handset are reporting that they are pretty happy with it.

The Mozart is the first WP7 handset to get copy and paste functionality, unofficially at least! Hopefully, Microsoft will release the NoDo update for all WP7 handsets within the next couple of weeks.

Via PocketNow