Tag Archives: Lulzsec

LulzSec Havoc: Change Your Important Passwords Before You Get Hit

The unknown and anonymous group (or single person) LulzSec is creating havoc, not just for companies like Sony, but also for government organizations like CIA and FBI. Most recently, the targets of the group has been common individuals like you and me.

In today’s data dump, LulzSec uploaded 62000 username and passwords for various users. Using this data anyone could login to your email account, , , bank account and more. It is definitely a huge privacy and security issue.

If you go through the Twitter feed of @LulzSec, you will see how the leaked passwords are being used. Some of those updates are really scary, take for example the one below where someone managed to destroy relationships over Facebook using those stolen accounts.

LulzSec Destruction

As you can see from the above screenshot, several users have used those accounts to access Xbox Live, PayPal, Facebook, Twitter, accounts. Some users even withdrew money from PayPal accounts and claimed to ruin relationships. This is definitely sickening.

Gizmodo has written an article to check if your passwords were leaked and find them out, however, don’t sit back happy if you are not one of the people who were not compromised. Regardless of whether or not your data was leaked, take about 15-20 minutes out of your time today and update the passwords for your Facebook, Twitter, Bank accounts and email providers like (, Hotmail, Yahoo) and other important services you use.

Make sure to create a new password for these services and if possible use different passwords on all of them. If you are having trouble with creating strong passwords read our guides on how to create strong passwords and more or use some password creation tools which can help you generate strong passwords

Though you might use hundreds of services, upgrading your passwords for some key services might save you trouble other individuals are going through. As a practice, try and use different passwords for different services and use alternative logins like (login through Twitter or Facebook) wherever you can.

LulzSec Takes Down CIA.gov Website, Forwards Prank Calls to FBI

In a brutal and continuous attack, a hacker group going by the name of LulzSec have been causing havoc in the web world. Earlier this month, LulzSec had taken down high profile sites such as Sony Developer Network and Sony Pictures.

Lulzsec CIA Down

Since then they have hacked several other high profile websites including gaming servers and more. Quite recently, @LulzSec have become quite active on and have been posting details about their exploits and asking users for suggestions for future hack targets.

LulzSec FBI Calls

In a day today, they have managed to bombard the FBI with calls and taken down the CIA website CIA.gov. The group who are behind this are anonymous (not be be confused with the group "Anonymous"), but their exploits are definitely creating quite a flutter within security circles.

This is definitely not the last time we are going to hear about @LulzSec, it is going be a long road ahead…

More updates coming..

LulzSec Breaks Into Sony Developer Network, Leaks Their Source Code

Continuing  their recent streak of break-ins into Sony web properties, the self proclaimed “world’s leaders in high-quality entertainment at your expense” Lulzsec just released a full 54MB archive consisting of Sony Computer Entertainment’s Developer network source code. Lulzsec tweeted their latest accomplishment just under half hour ago.

Sony has been under an ever-increasing spate of attacks and break-ins – the most recent being Sony Brazil, Sony Europe and  Sony Pictures Russia which was one of the most biggest hacks with over a million user names and passwords stolen. With this latest break-in ,16 of Sony’s web properties have been hacked into just under 45 days, giving an average hack rate of an astonishing 2.8 websites hacked per day.

While Lulzsec claims that the archive comprises of the Developer  network source code, a commentator on Hacker News mentions that the archive consists of Website source code rather than the actual PSN code.