Adobe Closes Flash Player 64-bit for Linux Labs Program

Close on the heels of releasing Flash Player 10.1, Adobe announced the closure of the Labs program of Flash Player 64-bit for Linux. Adobe also set the Flash 64-bit for Linux forums on read-only mode,   effectively quelling any and all means of discussion.

Adobe mentions in their announcement:

We have temporarily closed the Labs program of Flash Player 10 for 64-bit Linux, as we are making significant architectural changes to the 64-bit Linux Flash Player and additional security enhancements. […] We intend to provide more regular update information on our progress as we continue our work on 64-bit versions of Flash Player. Thank you for your continued help and support.

which effectively translates to something like, “hey, we screwed up, we don’t know what we’re doing, but yeah, we’re going to do something”. Not exactly a confidence booster, eh ?

Ubuntu for Tablet PCs Coming Soon

Ubuntu has already been successful on the desktop and netbook PC and is on a prospective roadmap. This growth continues as Ubuntu extends from beyond these conventional platforms and aims to capture the next big thing: tablets PCs.

The iPad drive has already shown us how much people love tablet PCs and Ubuntu sees this as the ripe time to jump into the all new Tablet PC market. With this, Ubuntu will compete with the likes of iOS, Android and Meego.

The only news currently known about this project is that it will have a touchscreen interface and will be based on the Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat.

Ubuntu is the most successful Linux distro amongst regular users who are not too involved in the development front. A Tablet powered by Ubuntu will appeal to all kinds of people ranging from students to journalists.

It will definitely be no match for the business model of the iPad though, with an open source technology powering it, prices of any tablet based on this will automatically come down. This will be a big attraction and might just be the USP of such a tablet.

The tablet is expected to make an appearance sometime next year and will be powered by an ARM processor and a Pixel Qi display.


Fluffy Linux – For Those Who Like Pink, Bunnies And Unicorn

Pink, Bunnies and Unicorns are what you will most probably find in a little girl’s room and certainly not in a Linux distro. But now there is Fluffy Linux with all the pink-ness (if there is such a word), bunnies, unicorn and, of course, fluffiness you can find. Here is a screenshot to make everything clear:

Like Hannah Montana Linux before it, Fluffy Linux is not exactly a completely new linux distribution. It is actually Kubuntu with a customized theme and apps which are modified to make them look “fluffier” and more pink.

Fluffy Linux came into being at this year’s KDE MM + Edu Sprint. It actually started out as a theme for Parley. This is what Herald Sitter, one of the two people behind Fluffy, has to say about Fluffy:

Fluffy will introduce Linux and the idea of Free/Libre Open Source Software to everyone who enjoys a pink,fluffy and good looking desktop.  Fluffy is not about writing letters or doing one’s taxes,  Fluffy is about enjoying Linux and KDE software in the best way possible. It replaces a boring computer with a world of wonders and imagination, where everything seems to be alive and an amazing graphical experience is waiting around every corner.
A world of unicorns and bunnies and fluffyness.

Fluffy Linux is certainly not for me. What do you think?

You can ge more pictures at Herald’s blog.

Linux Powers 91% Of The World’s Top 500 Fastest Supercomputers

The Top 500 Project lists the 500 fastest supercomputers in the world biannually. They have released this year’s list and in terms of the operating system used it is Linux all the way with more than 90% of the supercomputers running on Linux.

It is not surprising that Linux is generally preferred in supercomputers but the percentage (91%) is surprising.

Hers is a  diagrammatic  representation of the data. The larger boxes represents more powerful systems.

You can view this diagram and others like country-wise breakup , manufature-wise breakup etc in an interactive form at

In case you want the actual numerical breakup of the Operating System Family, here it is:

And here is the Operating System breakdown:

Firefox 64-bit Builds, Now Available For Windows, Linux and Mac

Up until now, Firefox lovers using a 64 bit operating system were restricted to using only the builds provided by their operating systems or, the ones they could get off the Mozilla-x86-64 project at This is going to change soon.

Mozilla has started rolling out nightly builds for Firefox on Mac and Linux and will soon start doing the same for Firefox on Windows as well. The 64 bit version is already available for Mac and Linux. The Windows version will arrive soon and the final version of the next release, Firefox 4 will see releases for both x86 and x64.

This can significantly improve the global browser-share of Firefox as people on x64 still keep struggling to get a feature rich and pluggable browser. Though, just a 64-bit build of Firefox would not do the trick as most plugins like the ones for Java and flash are available only for the 32 bit system.

The build is an experimental one and has many unresolved bugs. It can cause loss of data and of you still want to try it out, download it from the Mozilla Public FTP server.

MeeGo 1.0 Core OS For Netbooks And Nokia N900 Released

Today, the folks over at have released the first ever netbook version of the MeeGo OS. Along with netbooks, the core MeeGo OS for the Nokia N900 has also been released. This release is numbered v1.0, and is targeted towards developers for application development. The updates for the MeeGo OS will be rolled out regularly after a time-interval of six months. The next MeeGo OS (v1.1) update will be released in October. It will include support for various touch-based devices like handsets, in-car navigation systems etcetera.


The core MeeGo OS for netbooks only supports netbooks running on the Intel Atom processors. The MeeGo API for developers, which includes Qt v4.6, has also been released. The MeeGo SDK has also been released. As of now, the SDK is meant only for netbooks. An early-developer version will be released in June, which will include support for touch-based devices.

The core MeeGo OS for netbook and the Nokia N900 can be downloaded here.

Clementine Music Player – Amarok for Windows and Mac

music-player-oldies [Windows, Mac, Linux] If you know your way around the world of Linux, you’ve probably heard of Amarok, the music player for Linux operating systems. Now there’s Clementine, a version of Amarok for Windows, Macintosh and Linux. Here’s a list of the features:

• Search and play your local music library
• Listen to internet radio from and SomaFM
• Load M3U and XSPF playlists
• Edit tags on MP3 and OGG files, organize your music
• Download missing album cover art from
• Cross-platform – works on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux
• Native desktop notifications on Linux (libnotify) and Mac OS X (Growl)
• Supports MPRIS on Linux, or remote control using the command-line

I tried out the Windows version of Clementine recently and I found that it’s a pretty good music player and library organizer. Here are a few screenshots for you to look over.





Although Amarok is well developed and pretty much bug-free, Clementine isn’t there yet. Most of the features seemed to work fine. However, the online radio player feature for playing never did work for me. That’s too bad because that was the only real reason I tried it out. I was not able to check out the SomaFM player since I don’t have an account with that service.

I will definitely keep an eye on this open source project. I’m sure they’ll get the bugs out of it eventually. In the mean time, I don’t have any use for it.

Download page for Clementine

Techie Buzz Verdict:

I always try to use open source software when it’s available and does a good job. Clementine shows a lot of promise, but it still has a long way to go to compete with the many older and more mature music players. I can’t recommend it at this time.

Techie Buzz Rating: 2/5 (Below Average)

Sheldon Cooper: Ubuntu User

The Big Bang Theory has become my top favorite series from the time it started. The Big Bang Theory starring a group of four friends, all of whom have unusual habits has been a hit with the student and the geek culture.

The humor is something that only geeks get and that makes them feel special and exclusive.

Well, if you are a Linux fan and you have not noticed, Sheldon Cooper, the self-proclaimed genius and truest nerd on The Big Bang Theory has been seen using Ubuntu.

See for yourself in this video.

(Via: Seilo @ Geeky Ogre)

Seagate To Launch 3TB Hard Disks By Year End

Seagate one of the world’s most popular Hard disk manufacturer has confirmed that they are working on a 3 TB drive. According to Seagate, they will be “announcing a 3TB drive later this year.” As of now, 2TB is the highest storage capacity available in a single hard disk drive. The launch of 3TB drives will push the prices of the 2TB drives down, which will help increase their sale.


The shift to 3TB drives will not be smooth though. LBA or Logical Block Addressing standard is not capable of addressing capacities in excess of 2.1 TB. Seagate says that users need to upgrade their system’s BIOS, update the drivers in order to use the 3TB drives. Seagate also said that Windows XP will fail to see the 3 TB drive, and if it does manage to identify the drive, it will not see the full 3TB of space. Users need to use the 64-bit version of Windows Vista or Windows 7 to make full use of the 3 TB of space. In addition, modifiedversion of Linux will be able to see the full 3TB of space.

Seagate’s Senior Product Manager Barbara Craig also said, There’s also a GUID partition table (GPT) that needs to be implemented, for the master boot record.

Seagate did not mention anything about the prices of these upcoming 3TB drives.


Linux Kernel 2.6.34 Released

Linus Torvalds has announced the release of the Linux Kernel version 2.6.34 on Sunday this week. This new kernel has come after months of development and Linus made the release announcement at the unofficial Linux Kernel Mailing List He wrote,

Nothing very interesting here, which is just how I like it. Various random
fixes all over, nothing really stands out. Pretty much all of it is one-
or few-liners, I think the biggest patch in the last week was fixing some
semantics for the new SR-IOV VF netlink interface. And even that wasn't
a _big_ patch by any means.

So 2.6.34 is out, and the merge window is thus officially open.

The new Linux Kernel, version 2.6.34 has a new LogFS file-system file system, a faster networking support on KVM virtualization, updates on Btrfs file-system and many other GPU driver updates.

A complete list of changes can be found here.

Now that Kernel 2.6.34 is out,  developers  are focusing on bug fixes and the next kernel 2.6.35. Plans for the next kernel include improved support for ATI graphics and Intel H.264 video acceleration.

Linus Torvalds has decided to take some rest for a day or two now that a new milestone is reached. Though, it is not long before he gets back to work in full form. A list of bugs has already appeared on the release post which will surely give him the Monday morning blues.

(Via: Phoronix)