LG Optimus 2X Ice Cream Sandwich Rolling Out In Europe!

LG Optimus 2X owners, here is some good news for you. The Korean company has finally got its act together and has started rolling out the Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich update for O2X owners in Europe and other regions of the world. The update comes more than an year after Google unveiled Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich.

LG had released the ICS update for the Korean version of the Optimus 2X quite a few months ago, but took its own sweet time to release the update in Europe. The v30a ICS firmware includes all the goodness introduced by Google in Ice Cream Sandwich, along with smoother performance and LG’s latest launcher.

Optimus 2X owners can update their handset to Android 4.0 right away by using LG’s update tool, but many users have been reporting problem while using the app. For most O2X owners, the app re-installs the v20a firmware instead of upgrading the phone to ICS (v30a).

The Ice Cream Sandwich update marks the end of software support for the Optimus 2X from LG. So if you are expecting that LG might just update your handset to Jelly Bean, I am sorry to break your heart, but its not going to.

The Optimus 2X was the world’s first dual-core smartphone, but the way LG handled the software updates for the handset, it left a very bad taste with all O2X owners.

Via – GSMArena

LG Optimus L9 Launched In India For Rs.23,000

Today, LG finally launched the Android powered Optimus L9 smartphone in India. It is the company’s fourth device in the L-series family of smartphones. This handset was already available for pre-order from the last week in India. The LG Optimus L9 runs on the old Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) Operating System. This handset is designed around five primary aesthetic elements: Modern Square Style, Floating Mass Technology, Seamless Layout, Harmonized Design Contrast and Sensuous Slim Shape.

Mr. Soon Kwon, President South West Asia Region & MD, LG India, said,
“Smartphones today have become an essential part of life. People see it as an extension of themselves. Smartphones have come a long way from where they had started and today’s smartphones are a far cry from their bulky ancestors. LG Optimus L9 has been designed in a way that it can cater to every need of smart consumers who demands a powerhouse of style, performance and efficiency in their smartphones.”

lg optimus l9

LG Optimus L9 features a 4.7 inch IPS display, sporting a resolution of 540 x 960 pixels, 1 GHz dual-core processor, Android 4.0.4 (Ice Cream Sandwich) OS, 5 megapixel rear camera, full HD (1080p) video recording and playback, VGA front-facing camera for video calls, Wi-Fi 801.11 b/g/n, 3G Connectivity and more.

Other features include a 3.5 mm headset jack, 1 GB RAM, 4 GB expandable memory, MicroSD card slot, 32 GB expandable memory, DLNA, Bluetooth 3.0, A-GPS, QMemo, QTranslator, Google Play Store and a 2150 mAh battery. This handset measures 131.9 x 68.2 x 9.1 mm and weighs 125 grams.

LG Optimus L9 comes with new features such as Quick Translator which instantly translates foreign words and phrases into English features and QuickMemo app which offers powerful note-taking capabilities. Another amazing feature of the smartphone makes typing messages significantly easier as the keypad adjusts the key formation based on whether the user is typing with one hand or two. LG Optimus L9 comes with a price tag of Rs.23,000 (approx. $420) in India.

Nexus 4 8GB Sold Out In The U.S Play Store

Google and LG are clearly struggling with the demand for the Nexus 4. The company should have prepared itself after being bombarded with orders when the phone sold-out in just 20 minutes in Europe, Australia, United Kingdom and the United States when it was initially released on 13th November.

The Nexus 4 went back in sale on the U.S Play Store after the Thanksgiving weekend and while it did not really sold-out, the shipping time soon slipped to an insane 7-8 weeks for the 16GB as well as the 8GB variant of the handset.

As if these late shipping times were not enough, Google today finally put the Sold Out/Out of stock’ tag back on the 8GB variant of the Nexus 4 on the Play Store. The 16GB variant of the handset is not doing any better with a shipping time of around 9-10 weeks i.e. not before 2013. There is a very high possibility that the 16GB variant of the Nexus 4 will also go out of stock from the Play Store in the next few days. So, if the extremely long shipping times don’t bother you, head over to the Play Store and order the 16GB Nexus 4 now.

Looking at the way how Google and LG are struggling with the Nexus 4 orders in the United States, I am not too optimistic of the handset coming back in stock in Canada and other regions of the world anytime soon.

LG Optimus L9 Up For Pre-Order In India For Rs.19,990

LG Optimus L3, L5 and L7 were the first three L-series smartphones. Back in August, LG introduced yet another mid-range smartphone in the L-series family, the LG Optimus L9. This handset runs on the out-dated Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) Operating System and it comes with some decent specs such as a 4.7 inch display, 1 GHz dual-core processor, 4 GB internal memory and so on.

LG Optimus L7 comes with the QMemo app, which allows the users to capture, save and share their ideas with others using their fingertip or handwriting. Folks living in India will be able to get their hands-on this device in the next few days. Flipkart, the popular online retailer has also started taking the pre-orders of this device. Check out the complete specs below.

lg optimus l9

LG Optimus L9 features a 4.7 inch IPS display, sporting a resolution of 540 x 960 pixels, 1 GHz dual-core processor, Android 4.0.4 (Ice Cream Sandwich) OS, 5 megapixel rear camera, full HD (1080p) video recording and playback, VGA front-facing camera for video calls, Wi-Fi 801.11 b/g/n, 3G Connectivity and more.

Other features include a 3.5 mm headset jack, 1 GB RAM, 4 GB expandable memory, MicroSD card slot, 32 GB expandable memory, DLNA, Bluetooth 3.0, A-GPS, QMemo, QTranslator, Google Play Store and a 2150 mAh battery. This handset measures 131.9 x 68.2 x 9.1 mm and weighs 125 grams.

LG Optimus L9 comes with a price-tag of Rs.19,990 in India. LG might roll out the android 4.1 (Jelly Bean) update for this device in the coming months, but we are not sure why would anyone want to spend 20k on a smartphone with a year-old OS. LG fanboys can head over to this page and pre-order this device.

Nexus 4 LTE Radio Enabled; Works Only In Canada!

Back when Google unveiled the Nexus 4, there was a huge cry over the lack of LTE on the phone. The Nexus 4 very well features an LTE capable radio inside its 9.1mm thick body, but it has been disabled by Google over battery life concerns. Well, an XDA member has managed to enable LTE on the Nexus 4 in all its high-speed glory.

Sadly, the LTE connectivity will only work in Canada on 1700MHz frequency. This means that this trick will not allow Nexus 4 owners in the United States to enjoy LTE on their handset, since this 1700MHz band — known as the AWS in the U.S — is not used by carrier. The method to enable LTE is also pretty easy, and all the user needs to do is key in *#*#4636#*#* in the dialer and change the network mode to LTE.

Below is a video of LTE in action on the Nexus 4 -:

 

So if you own a Nexus 4 and are living in Canada, you can enjoy LTE on all the carriers out there including TELUS and Rogers.

Via – XDA, Engadget

LG Optimus Vu P895 Review

Samsung’s original Note singlehandedly created the segment of smartphones that is commonly referred to as Phablet. These are devices that are larger than most conventional phones, but smaller than tablets. I have never been a big fan of phablets. They are essentially compromise devices – too large to be conveniently used as a phone, yet too small to confer the multimedia benefits of a tablet. I found the original Note to be simply a bloated version of the S2. However, clearly, a large section of the populace didn’t mind the giant screen, as the original Note sold quite well. The recently introduced Note 2 has been doing even better – selling more than three million units in less than a month.

Now, other manufactures are also getting in on the act, and last month, LG introduced its first phablet – the Optimus Vu P895 in India. Soon Kwon – MD of LG India, believes that the Vu has everything that the competition fails to offer. I used the Vu as my primary device for the better half of the past week to find out if it lives up to the promise.

Appearance

LG-Optimus-Vu-Front

Even though LG’s 2012 series of smartphones have been a bit all over the place in terms of overall quality, one thing they have consistently delivered on is design. The Optimus Vu is no exception. It is exceedingly thin (8.5 mm), and feels solidly constructed. There’s a lot of plastic, but it doesn’t feel cheap and flimsy. I have been a fan of LG’s bold rectangular design principle, and the Vu holds onto much of what I liked about the Optimus 4X. The matte finish of the back cover makes the Vu easier to grip, and the sliding door covering the micro-USB port is a nice touch. However, the most striking feature of the Optimus Vu is just wide it is. At 90.4 mm, the Optimus Vu is about a centimeter wider than the Note 2. The extra width means that unless you have a really big hand, you are going to have a hard time gripping the Vu. I found it extremely uncomfortable (almost painful) to hold the Vu during long conversations. Thankfully, in spite of the bulk, the Vu is fairly light, weighing just 168 grams.

LG-Optimus-Vu-Galaxy-S3-One-X
LG Optimus Vu next to a Galaxy SIII and an One X

LG has utilized the extra width to pack in a couple of additional buttons. At the top left there is an additional button that triggers the QuickMemo app. At the bottom, there is an additional capacitive button for launching the new Android task switcher. Both of these are non-essential additions, but are nice to have.

LG-Optimus-Vu-Back

LG could have slimmed down the Vu a bit more by shrinking the rather wide bezels. However, the extra bezel space has eliminated the accidental button press problem that I encountered in the Optimus 4X.

Display

The Vu features a 5’’ HD-IPS LCD screen with a resolution of 1024-by-768 pixels. LG claims that the PC-like 4:3 aspect ratio is ‘perfect for multitasking’. I will take a closer look to see if that claim has any substance in the Software section of this review. The screen is bright and offers good outdoor visibility with excellent viewing angles. It’s not as vibrant as the Note 2’s or One X’s display, but doesn’t appear washed out like some of the other LG displays.

Hardware

The Optimus Vu ships with a Quad-core 1.5 GHz Tegra 3 processor and 1 GB RAM. Performance-wise it’s very similar to the Optimus 4X. It scored 11593 in AnTuTu, 2749 in AnTuTu 3D, and 4411 in Quadrant. These scores mean that the Vu is significantly faster than the original Note, but is handsomely beaten by the likes of Note 2 and Optimus G. In real life, the Optimus Vu’s performance offered little reason for complaint. Whether I was browsing through the gallery, surfing JavaScript intensive websites, or playing Nova 3, the Vu didn’t miss a beat.

The Optimus Vu ships with a 5.5’’ Rubberdium stylus. Vu’s stylus falls somewhere between the original Note’s and the Note 2’s stylus. It’s thicker than most styluses, but not as think as the new S Pen, which can be actually gripped like a pen. Since, the Vu needs to be used with two hands anyway, it’s a smart move to include a stylus. Unfortunately, all the benefits that the stylus could have offered is rendered moot by sheer stupidity. LG has thrown in a stylus, but the phone itself doesn’t have any slot for storing the stylus. Instead, you have to actually carry around the stylus in your pocket. This is of course a major annoyance. I already almost lost the stylus once, and after a couple of days, I simply stopped carrying around the stylus. Samsung on the other hand, not only provides a mechanism to store the stylus, but actually reminds you if you forget to tuck your stylus into the phone before walking away. The second sore point is that the Optimus Vu stylus is not pressure sensitive. The S Pen stylus for the Note 2, on the other hand, can differentiate between 1024 pressure levels. So, the Vu stylus can only be used as a pointing device or for scribbling. Don’t think about drawing or doodling with it. The final and the biggest point of annoyance is that you can actually tap on the capacitive buttons with the stylus. So, while using the stylus, you will have to consistently toggle between using your finger and the stylus. The stylus really seems to be something that LG tucked on to the Vu at the last moment for namesake.

Software

LG-Optimus-Vu-Home-Screen

The Optimus Vu ships with Android 4.0.4, and is slated to get Android 4.1 (Jellybean) in first quarter of next year. No word on whether it will receive Android 4.2 or not. There is the customary LG Optimus UX running on top of stock ICS. While some aspects of the Optimus UX – like its overuse of bright colors – are annoying, there are plenty of thoughtful additions. LG has a TouchWiz like scrollable notification bar, but unlike in TouchWiz, it’s completely customizable. In fact, customizability is one of the strongest points of Optimus UX. For example, everything about the lock screen can be changed including how the clock looks or what shortcuts appear in the dock.

LG-Optimus-Vu-Notification-Quick-Settings

LG’s QuickMemo, which we earlier saw in the 4X and the L-series handsets, has made it to the Vu too. It is essentially an enhanced note taking app that is now accessible through its dedicated physical button. You can annotate presentations, documents, webpages, and just about anything with QuickMemo. You can save your memos for later reference or share them with your contacts.

In addition to QuickMemo, LG has added another note taking app called Notebook. In fact, all QuickMemos go into a single folder inside the Notebook. The Notebook allows you to create elaborate notes with images, drawings, and text. Other bundled apps include a backup tool, a news reader, Polaris office, and a video editor called Video Wiz.

LG-Optimus-Vu-Notebook-Handwriting

One aspect of the Vu where LG has put in a lot of thought and effort is the keyboard. The keyboard has four distinct modes – a classic feature phone layout (that I am sure no one will use), QWERTY layout for tap typing, QWERTY layout for Swype style shape writing, and a handwriting recognition mode. Normally, typing with single hand is impossible on the Vu. However, the keyboard has a special singlehanded typing mode that can be triggered via convenient gestures. When in this mode, the keyboard automatically shrinks and sticks to one edge of the screen (left or right). Although, I found the stylus to be pretty unusable in its current form, I did give handwriting recognition a fair spin and came away impressed. It was able to pick up my shabby handwriting with surprising amount of accuracy. Not only is the recognition engine accurate, but also quite fast. It’s a pity that the stylus is so unusable. The only complaint that I have is that most keyboard settings are buried several levels deep in the Android interface.

LG-Optimus-Vu-Keyboard-Modes

LG claims that the 4:3 interface is best for multitasking. After taking the Vu for a spin, I can’t say that I am convinced. LG might be onto something, but the Vu’s software fails to drive that point home. In fact, the Note 2 with its multi-window multi-tasking is a lot more productive. Even, QSlide from Optimus G with added support for streaming videos, would have been quite handy. However, with the standard interface, I don’t see how the Vu is better suited for multitasking than any of the other current generation smartphones. In fact, the 4:3 aspect ratio has a negative impact on the multimedia experience, since almost all video content is in widescreen aspect ratios. Some apps like Subway Surfer also have a problem with the Vu’s resolution and need to be scaled. The only aspect where the Vu really benefits from its resolution is web browsing in portrait mode.

LG-Optimus-Vu-Width

Multimedia

LG Optimus Vu P895 ships with an 8 megapixel camera, which may not be the best mobile camera in the market, but produces good quality images and acceptable videos. Its weakest point is low light capture, where it performs significantly worse than the S3. However, under proper lighting conditions, the Vu takes well balanced, detailed images. The algorithm that LG is using is really smart and manages to get the settings bang on in most cases. In keeping with Optimus UX’s focus on customizability, the camera interface is also adjustable. The usual features including panorama, HDR, and burst modes are present. The Vu lacks an option for macro-focusing. However, don’t let that fool you into thinking that the Vu can’t take close up pics. The auto-mode is really good at figuring out when you want to use macro mode. The camera app’s biggest draw is ‘Time Catch Shot’, which we first saw in the Optimus 4X. When you enable this feature, the Vu captures five shots in a quick succession, including shots from moments before you clicked on the shoot button, from which you can select and keep the best shot. With Time Catch, even if you are too late or too early with the shoot button, you can still capture the moment you wanted. Another gimmicky feature called Cheese shot captures the pic when you say ‘cheese’.

LG-Optimus-Vu-Camera-Sample-Landscape
LG Optimus Vu Camera Sample: Landscape
LG-Optimus-Vu-Camera-Sample-HDR
LG Optimus Vu Camera Sample: HDR
LG-Optimus-Vu-Camera-Sample-Macro
LG Optimus Vu Camera Sample: Macro

The Vu shoots videos at 1080p with 30 frames per second. LG has thrown in a couple of interesting video effects. You can remove the video background and instead use a disco, sunset, or space background. You can also pick a video from your own library to use as a background. Be warned though, in order for this feature to work, your background needs to be stationary and the phone needs to be extremely stable. You also have bunch of face wrap options for playing with your friends.

The video player in Vu boasts of all the excellent enhancements we saw in the Optimus 4X. They are –

  • Fingertip seek, which shows a YouTube like preview of the frame you are about to jump to while seeking.
  • Speed controller, which allows you to slow down or speed up the video on the fly.
  • Split-Screen view, which allows you to quickly browse through your library.
  • Pinch-to-zoom, which allows you to zoom into any video you are watching. While this is not something that you will use regularly, it is a nice to have enhancement.

Others

LG Optimus Vu features a number of connectivity options including NFC, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct, DLNA, and Bluetooth 4.0. Like Sony, LG includes a couple of NFC Tags called Tag+, which can be used to automatically change your phone’s settings to a preset mode. These tags can be configured with the companion Android app.

The Optimus Vu includes a 2080 mAh non-user replaceable battery. This can be a real headache, given that the Vu doesn’t really last all that long. I only got about nine hours with moderate usage on 3G. This is unacceptable for a phablet, since its strong point is supposed to be watching videos and surfing the web. The Note 2 on the other hand comes with a 3100 mAh battery.

LG has also opted to not include an expandable memory slot. However, this is unlikely to be a major problem for most users, given that Vu ships with 32 GB of internal storage.

Conclusion

As I mentioned in the beginning, I am not a big fan of phablets, and the Vu did nothing to change that. However, if I keep my preferences aside, then I must admit that the Vu is an interesting device. It certainly has a lot going for itself. It’s fast, well designed, sports a good camera and a feature-packed video player. It also makes a few mistakes. Unfortunately for LG, the Vu’s oversights are really big, and they end up hurting what would have otherwise been an excellent product.

I tried really hard to understand why LG would go for a 4:3 screen, but failed to come up with anything concrete. My takeaway is that with this odd proportion, LG has sacrificed too much to gain too little. The next slipup is with the Stylus. In fact, LG gets the stylus so wrong that you should pretty much ignore it all together. You are unlikely to be using it a lot. And, even if you want to use it, you will probably lose it very quickly. My final grudge is with the battery. If you are going to make the battery non user replaceable, you better make sure that it has enough juice to last a day.

When I began to use the Vu, I really liked the device. Yes, it was too big, but it had a nice display, was really smooth and fast, had a nice speaker, and took great snaps. Unfortunately, the poor battery subconsciously affected how I used the Vu. I started watching YouTube less frequently as I was afraid that I would run out of battery before I reached home. This is a real pity, because the Vu had a lot of promise. It’s sensibly priced and can currently be picked up for Rs. 30,000. Yes, it costs the same as Samsung’s previous generation Note. And, that’s the biggest redeeming factor for the Vu. On the whole, the Vu fails to live up to Mr. Kwon’s promise. It simply can’t compete against the Note 2. However, it’s also significantly cheaper. If you want the best phablet that money can buy, you should get the Note 2. However, if you want something cheaper, take a long and hard look at both the Note and the Vu. If you can live with Vu’s odd proportion, and don’t mind carrying your charger around, it might make sense for you to go for the Vu instead of the Note. It’s hardware is a generation ahead of the Note. Otherwise, the Vu might end up frustrating you.

Pre-Order Google Nexus 4 in India for Rs. 23,490

LG India’s head of mobile product planning Amit Gujral had earlier revealed that LG will introduce the Nexus 4 in the country by the end of November. Since then, LG Electronics India has remained tight lipped about its plans regarding the new Nexus smartphone. However, thanks to an eBay, the Nexus 4 is already available for pre-order in India.

Nexus 4 is Google’s newest flagship, which was manufactured in partnership with LG. It runs on vanilla Android 4.2 (Jelly Bean), is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon(TM) S4 Pro quad-core processor, and flaunts a 4.7″ WXGA IPS display with 1280 x 768 pixel resolution (320 ppi).

Buy-Nexus-4-India

Ebay seller cart2india2010 is accepting pre-orders on unlocked Nexus 4 handsets in India. The seller will be importing Nexus 4 handsets, which have been presumably purchased through Google Play store in the US. The Nexus 4 is available through Google for $299 for the 8 GB model, and $349 for the 16 GB model. However, in several European countries, LG is selling the handset for €599 (about $762). Since, Google Play store is not available in India, it’s most likely that only LG will be selling the Nexus 4. If that happens, we expect the price of to be in the range of Rs. 35,000 to Rs. 40,000 depending upon the model you chose.

Ebay’s cart2india2010 offers a tempting alternative through its imported handsets. The current pre-order price is Rs. 23,490 for the 8 GB model and Rs. 27,490 for the 16 GB model. Unless, Google comes in and subsidizes its latest flagship, Indians are unlikely to get it for anywhere near the price that cart2india2010 is offering. However, since cart2india2010 will only begin shipping the devices after December 10, it might make sense to wait till the end of November for the official announcement.

[ Pre-order Google Nexus 4 ]

LG Smart World Hacked, User Information Leaked

A hacker going by the Twitter handle @Ur0b0r0x has breached LG Smart World, and leaked email addresses and password hashes of 11,316 users [Please see update below]. Smart World is LG’s official app store, providing apps for smart TVs, smartphones, and home appliances. The same hacker had earlier hacked 32 websites belonging to the Government of Columbia.

LG-Smart-World-Hacked

The hacked data dump has already been indexed by OZ Data Centa. If you want to find out if your info has been leaked, head over to ozdc.net and search for your email address. According to OZDC, the leaked information contains 11203 valid emails, out of which, 284 had already been compromised by some other data breach incident. Thankfully, LG was not storing passwords in plain text. However, I am not sure exactly what hashing algorithm it was using. If your account has been affected, immediately change your password on Smart World as well as all other websites on which you were using the same password.

Nothing on the internet is truly secure. Data and privacy breaches are often inevitable. However, you can avoid being burned by being prepared for the worst case scenario. Some of the elementary precautions are:

  • Using distinct, non-guessable, and non-dictionary word passwords. You can use a password manager like Lastpass to manage your various accounts.
  • Enabling two-step authentication on services like Gmail that supported it.
  • Using a truly secure secret question for password reset options.

Update: LG spokeperson reached out to us stating that LG has been unable to verify a breach. “Äs far as we know, no private or sensitive information has been accessed”, he added.

LG Launches 84-inch Ultra High Definition 3D TV in India

LG Electronics India launched its new 84-inch 3D TV in the country at the Stuff Gadget Show being held in Mumbai. The gigantic SmartTV flaunts a 4K resolution (3840 x 2160), and sports the same bunch of cutting edge features that has made LG a leader in the 3D space.

LG-84-inch-3D-TV-1

LG is not the first to release a 4K TV; however, it is the world’s first to offer an 84 inch 3D television with a 4K display resolution. The enhanced resolution means that pixels are barely discernable even when viewed from a close distance. LG’s latest offering sports all of the swanky new features we saw in the previously released 2012 range of LG 3D TVs. This includes dual-play, smartshare plus, 2D to 3D conversion, and magic remote. Check out our previous coverage for a more in-depth look at each of these features.

LG-84-inch-3D-TV-Glasses

LG utilizes polarized passive glasses for its 3D technology. This has enabled it to overcome one of the biggest pain points of 3D – picture quality. Even with the glasses, color reproduction and contrast is excellent. During my brief hands-on time, I didn’t notice any significant display artifacts. Viewing angles were also pretty good. In brief, when it comes to picture quality, LG’s 3D TV offers very little room for complaint. However, 3D viewing on the larger screen did appear to be more stressful for the eyes.

LG-84-inch-3D-TV-India

The biggest problem with an 84-inch 4k display is not something that LG can control – the lack of source material. HD content is rare, but Ultra HD is almost impossible to get. As far as I know, DTH service providers in India only offer 720p or 1080p streams. Presumably, LG will leverage the dual-core processor powering its 84-inch monster to upscale the content. However, I couldn’t test how well this works, since LG was not demoing any live television streams. One also has to wonder how well a 720p or 1080p 3D content will look on a display this big. However, these are the prices one has to pay for staying on the cutting-edge, and this beast from LG is certainly cutting-edge.

LG 84LM9600 will be available in select stores in the metros, and is being released with a MRP of Rs. 17,00,000. However, I am told that you should be able to pick it up for something in the range of fourteen to fifteen lakhs.

Google And LG Unveil The Nexus 4 – No LTE and Only 16GB Storage With A Killer Price Tag

Google may have had to cancel its Android event in New York today due to Hurricane Sandy, but that did not stop the company from officially announcing the next Nexus handset – the LG Nexus 4.

The Nexus 4 is the first Nexus branded handset to be made by LG and is a beast in every sense. The handset has leaked numerous times over the last few weeks, and the press release from Google just confirms it.

Inside the 9.1mm thin body of the Nexus 4 is a quad-core Krait processor from Qualcomm clocked at 1.5GHz, 2GB of RAM, a 8MP camera in the back, 1.3MP in the front, 4.7-inch WXGA (1280 x 768) resolution, 8 or 16GB of internal memory, NFC and wireless charging. A beefy non-removable 2100mAh battery gives the handset a talk time of 15.3 hours.

“LG is proud and excited to play this role in helping build the latest Nexus smart-phone,” said Dr. Jong-seok Park, President and CEO of LG Electronics Mobile Com-munications Company. “Users will be delighted by the perfectly balanced combination of form and function with the latest generation of Android.”

The handset will come with Android 4.2 Jelly Bean on-board that brings with it certain new features including enhanced security, quick settings in the notification bar and more.

The Nexus 4 will be sold unlocked and is compatible with GSM/HSPA+ networks on more than 200 different network providers. The handset will be available for purchase on Google Play from November 13th in the U.S, United States, UK, Canada, Germany, France, Spain and Australia. Asia, Europe and other major regions of the world should get the handset sometime towards the end of November.

The price tag of the LG Nexus 4 is what that makes it interesting. Google will be selling the unlocked Nexus 4 for only $299 for the 8GB variant, while the 16GB variant will cost only $349. A T-Mobile variant of the Nexus 4 will also be available soon for $199 on a two-year contract.