Tag Archives: Kubuntu

Rekonq Getting Extensions Support



It seems like the being picked as the default browser for the upcoming Kubuntu Maverick Meerkat has really boosted the development of Rekonq, the KDE web-browser based on Webkit. The browser, which has till now been just about functional, is getting extensions support.

KDE developer Nikhil Marathe is currently working on bringing extensions to Rekonq. The good thing about  this is that the Rekonq  extensions  are based on Google Chrome’s  extension  API. This means that once completed, you will be able to use Google Chrome extensions in Rekonq.

In another Rekonq related news, Rekonq is getting its first beta release on 25 May as Rekonq 0.5. The extensions will not be there in the beta though. If you are using Ubuntu Lucid Lynx, Rekonq 0.4 is already present in the repository. You can try it out with the command:

sudo apt-get install rekonq

[via Markus’ Little Blog ]

Rekonq To Be The Default Web Browser In Kubuntu 10.10

With the Ubuntu Developer Summit going on, we are constantly receiving reports of new changes and feature addition for Maverick.

The latest news that caught my attention is that Rekonq is going to be the default browser in Kubuntu 10.10.

Rekonq is a KDE web browser based off of Nokia’s QtDemoBrowser, which is what  the Arora web browser is based on. Rekonq’s focus is to provide a  QtWebKit-based web browser with superior KDE integration. Its aim is to  embrace KDE technologies to have a fully-featured KDE web browser.
Features:
  • Tabbed browsing
  • Uses KDE download system for downloading files
  • Shares bookmarks with Konqueror
  • Supports proxies and anonymous browsing
  • Can inspect web pages

Although many might not have heard of Rekonq, its is quite a solid browser with a lot of potential. I did a HTML5 compatibility test about a month back and was quite surprised to find that it outperformed even Firefox and Opera. However, what bothers me is that it is not as polished as I would like it to be. Hopefully by the time for the release of Kubuntu 10.10, it will be sufficiently polished.

If you want to try out Rekonq, open the terminal and execute the command given below:

sudo apt-get install rekong

Global Menu Comes To KDE SC

In the Ubuntu Developers Summit, Aurelien Gateau presented a project that he has been working on for the next Kubuntu release i.e. Kubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat. He introduced a Global Menu for KDE SC following the announcement of Global Menu for GNOME that Mark Shuttleworth made earlier. However, the feature is being developed for KDE SC 3.x and has not been ported to KDE SC 4.x yet.

The Global Menu implementation uses D-Bus, which means that GTK+ applications running in KDE will also have its menu bar in the Global Menu. As Shuttleworth pointed out when he introduced the Global Menu earlier, this is mainly aimed at  Netbook users to maximize the vertical pixel usage at the expense of horizontal space.

Here is a video to demonstrate the Global Menu:

[via agateau.wordpress.com]

Screenshot Preview of Kubuntu Netbook Remix

kubuntu-icon I recently tried the newest version of the Kubuntu Netbook Remix (KNR). As you may already know, the newest versions of Ubunutu 10.4 LTS (Lucid Lynx) and Kubuntu were recently released.

I’ve always been a bigger fan of the Gnome desktop in Ubuntu, but I still like to check out the KDE versions in Kubuntu, just to see what’s new. This release of the Kubuntu Netbook Remix, is really a great operating system for netbook users. I’ll show you what it looks like below.

Loading it onto the netbook was an easy task for me. I simply downloaded the 776mb ISO file from the download page. Then I burned it to a 2Gb SD Flash card using Unetbootin.

kubuntu-download

Here are the screenshots:

1. The Newspaper Page

This page is revealed when you click the Newspaper’ button on the top task bar. The image below is actually a screenshot of the last version of Kubuntu. Somehow, I totally missed seeing this page when I gave it my test run. As you can see, it has a task list, calendar, weather report, sticky notes and image viewer.

kubuntu-screenshot-newspaper

2. The home screen

This first screen shows you the major categories of applications and settings. At first, I had no idea why there was an Installicon at the very top, all by itself. Later I found out that this section at the top is the favoritessection. You can add your favorite apps to this section by clicking on the little star you see when you hover over an application’s launch icon.

kubuntu-screenshot1

3. The Office’ applications

Everything you need for your mobile office is included. I use the Open Office apps almost exclusively when I’m at home or on the road. Who needs the big dollar MS Office Suite when you can get the same functions for free?

kubuntu-screenshot2

4. Education software

I can’t tell you much about the applications in the educational section. I’ve never used them.

kubuntu-screenshot3

5. Games!

That’s my favorite section and I was happy to see my favorite game, Mahjongg. You might recognize some of the others as your favorites.

kubuntu-screenshot4

6. Graphics

A good selection of image viewers and editors. I think they need to put Gimp back in though.

kubuntu-screenshot5

7. Internet applications

There are tons of internet apps here. Browsers, Email, and a Blog editor are the main ones I’ve used. I was surprised to find that Firefox was not installed. However, they have a nice little launcher here that made it simple to install.

kubuntu-screenshot6

8. Multimedia apps

I have never used any of these three apps. However, I’m told that Amarok is an awesome music manager.

kubuntu-screenshot7

9. System tools

Everything you need to tweak your system is here.

kubuntu-screenshot8

10. Utilities

Several handy and must have’ utilities are included here.

kubuntu-screenshot9

11. Application switching (method 1)

The first way I found to switch the application displayed, was to click on the apps runningbutton on the top taskbar. It gives you a nice overview of the apps currently running. Just click on the one you want to use.

kubuntu-screenshot11

12. Application switching (method 2)

The second method to switch running apps, is to use the ALT + Tab keys. This takes you into the awesome looking 3d task preview. It will certainly get some attention when someone is looking over your shoulder.

kubuntu-screenshot10

Summary:

I enjoyed the few minutes I spent trying out Kubuntu Netbook Remix. I was amazed at how well it ran on the very limited resources that my netbook has. The KNR team has really put together a big winner here. However, it’s not enough to steal me away from the UNR (Ubuntu Netbook Remix) that I love even more.

What’s New In Kubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

Ubuntu 10.04 was released two days back and has been getting a lot of attention due to its new branding, theme etc. On the same day, KDE SC based Ubuntu derivative,  Kubuntu 10.04 was also released.

Here are the new features that made it to Kubuntu 10.04:

New Branding

Just like the new branding that Ubuntu got, Kubuntu also has a new branding for Lucid Lynx. It now has a new logo and icon which are now part of the updated Plymouth boot splash screen.

KDE Software Compilation 4.4

Kubuntu 10.04 comes with the new KDE Software Complilation 4.4. KDE SC 4.4 provides many new features like improved Nepomuk Semantic Search, tabbed windows etc.

Better Firefox Integration

In Kubuntu 10.04, Firefox is integrated more closely. Firefox now respects the KDE settings on the default applications to handle certain file-types etc. It also uses the native KDE file dialog.

Amarok 2.3

Kubuntu 10.04 comes with the latest version of Amarok i.e Amarok 2.3. Amarok 2.3 brings new features like equalizer, new toolbar etc.

Kubuntu Netboot Remix

The Kubuntu Netboot Remix  is now officially available with Kubuntu 10.04. It uses KDE SC 4.4 plamsa-netbook interface.

You can download Kubuntu 10.04 from here or read the official release note here.

New Kubuntu Logo Design Revealed, “K” still missing

Yesterday when we reported about the new plymouth theme for Kubuntu, we mentioned that the Kubuntu logo is still being developed and that the logo used in the plymouth theme will be replaced by the new theme once it is finished.

In the Kubuntu meeting yesterday night, the Kubuntu Council has approved the design for the new Kubuntu logo. The logo clearly follows the design of the new Ubuntu logo and has the same font. Here is the new Kubuntu logo:

As you can see very clearly, the logo is unfinished. This is because the new font that came with the new Ubuntu branding is still not complete and is still missing many letters including “K” yet.

Meanwhile another Kubuntu member, David Wonderly, has touched-up the official design and added the Kubuntu-Blue color and some glow-effect to come up with a wonderful design.

The new Kubuntu logo is expected to be shipped with the second beta which is scheduled to be released on 8th April.

What do you think about the new design? Do you like it? Let us know through the comment.

Kubuntu 10.04 and Lubuntu 10.04 Gets New Plymouth Theme

When Canonical’s “Self-Appointed Benevolent  Dictator for Life”, Mark Shuttleworth, announced the new branding of Ubuntu, many asked him if there is going to be new  branding  for other Ubuntu-derivatives like Kubuntu. Shuttleworth replied that there will be new brandings and that the designers at Canonical are working on that.

Now, a part of the new branding for Kubuntu 10.04 and Lubuntu 10.04 has  emerged  with the release of the new plymouth themes for both of them. Sadly, the new theme has not come in  Xubuntu 10.04 yet.

The new plymouth themes in both Kubuntu and Lubuntu are identical in design to that of Ubuntu. The only difference is the logo and the color.

Here are the new plymouth themes for Kubuntu and Lubuntu:

Kubuntu 10.04 Plymouth Theme
Lubuntu 10.04 Plymouth Theme

The Kubuntu plymouth theme is not final. As part of the new branding, new logos are being designed for Kubuntu. When the new logos are available, the logo that is used in the plymouth theme right now will be replaced by the new logo.

The some decisions of the Canonical design team regarding the Ubuntu branding did not go down very well with certain sections of the Ubuntu community. When the news of the new Kubuntu branding emerged, certain  sections of the community has already started raising concerns if the design team will make those same decisions for Kubuntu as well.

Installing KDE 4.4 in Ubuntu, openSUSE, Fedora And ArchLinux

Few days ago, the KDE team had announced the release of KDE 4.4. We, at Techie-Buzz had taken you on a screenshot tour of KDE 4.4. Now, if that has piqued your interest to explore KDE 4.4, let’s have a look on how you can install KDE 4.4 on some popular Linux distributions.

KDE 4.4

Installing KDE 4.4 in openSUSE

openSUSE’s 1-click install and openSUSE build system makes it one of the easiest methods of installing KDE 4.4 ( or for that matter, any software). Head over to KDE 4 page of openSUSE wiki, and select the 1-click install link on the version of openSUSE that you have. For those extra lazy ones out there ( I’m one of those ;) ) here are the links:

Installing KDE 4.4 in Ubuntu/Kubuntu

To install KDE 4.4 in Kubuntu, first add the PPA by opening the Terminal and typing

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:kubuntu-ppa

If you’re using Ubuntu, add the backports PPA

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:kubuntu-ppa/backports

Next, update the repositories to reflect the newly added PPA by typing

sudo apt-get update

Finally, if you’re using Kubuntu, perform the update to KDE 4.4 by typing

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

If you’re using Ubuntu, then install the kubuntu-desktop package to install KDE 4.4

sudo apt-get install kubuntu-desktop

Installing KDE 4.4 in ArchLinux

ArchLinux users can install/update to KDE 4.4 using pacman – the awesome package manager.

Installing KDE:

pacman -Sy kde

Upgrading to KDE 4.4:

pacman -Syu

Installing KDE 4.4 in Fedora 12

Fedora users will have to add repo file provided by KDE Packaging project to proceed with the installation. Download the repo file, save it in /etc/yum.repos.d directory.

Next, launch KPackageKit, head over to settings and enable kde and kde-testing repository. Once this is done, launch the terminal, switch over to root by typing

su root

Then, proceed with update by typing

yum groupupdate kde-desktop

Enjoy your KDE 4.4 install!

Linux Mint 8 Fluxbox Community Edition | Linux Mint 8 KDE64 Community Edition

Linux Mint 8, codenamed “Helena” , had two more additions to the family : Linux Mint 8 Fluxbox Community Edition and Linux Mint 8 KDE64 Community Edition.

Linux Mint is an Ubuntu based Linux distribution with integrated media codecs and a sleek user-friendly look. Over the years it has evolved to be a complete Distribution within itself, complete with a custom desktop menu, unique configuration tools, a web-based package installation interface and a number of different editions.

Linux Mint 8 KDE64 Community Edition

Linux Mint 8 KDE Edition has been available for over a week now and is based on Kubuntu 9.10.

Linux Mint 8 KDE64 Community Edition has all the features of the KDE Edition like KDE 4.3 with improved performance and stability, Software and Update Manager improvements and default applications like Songbird, Tucan and Minitube.

This KDE64 version is identical to KDE Edition but compiled for 64 bit processors (Intel Core 2 Duo, Intel Core 2 Quad, AMD Athlon X2 64 and all x86-64 compliant processors).

Linux Mint 8 Fluxbox Community Edition

This release has been built with the emphasis on a lightweight and yet fully functional desktop centered on the Fluxbox window manager.

Linux Mint 8 Fluxbox Community Edition is easily configurable to run on lower-spec hardware with the tools needed for doing so readily available. It is based on Fluxbox 1.1.1 and other than improvements in the Software and Update Manager, it also has changes in the Menu whereby the “System Tools” submenu has been broken down into smaller, less intrusive submenus.

With the addition of KDE, Fluxbox as well as 64-bit editions, it turns out that Linux Mint is turning out to be a more than “just another Ubuntu fork”. Let’s hope other Linux Distributions try to provide the user experience that the Linux Mint guys have managed to accomplish.

Linux Mint 8 Fluxbox Community Edition can be downloaded from here and Linux Mint 8 KDE64 Community Edition can be downloaded from here.

For Linux users in India, you can save your bandwidth and directly buy the Linux Mint 8 Live CDs from here.

Kernel Vulnerabilities Detected In Recent Ubuntu Distributions

Canonical has released a security notice announcing the presence of kernel vulnerabilities in recent Ubuntu distributions. The vulnerability affects Ubuntu 6.06, 8.04, 8.10, 9.04 and 9.10 versions, but not Ubuntu 7.04 or Ubuntu 7.10 versions. The security notice mentions that corresponding versions of other desktop environment based distributions of the Ubuntu family, Kubuntu, Edubuntu and Xubuntu are also affected. As part of the advisory, Canonical has recommended an immediate update of the kernel to versions mentioned below:

  • Ubuntu 6.06 update to linux-image-2.6.15-55.82
  • Ubuntu 8.04 update to linux-image-2.6.24-27.65
  • Ubuntu 8.10 update to linux-image-2.6.28-17.45
  • Ubuntu 9.04 update to linux-image-2.6.28-18.59
  • Ubuntu 9.10 update to linux-image-2.6.31-19.56

The vulnerabilities which affects various modules would cause amongst others, remote user being about to crash the system, gain root privileges and local attacker being able to consume all network traffic leading to denial of service.

The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures(CVEs) which are referenced for the above security bulletin are:

  • CVE-2009-4020
  • CVE-2009-4021
  • CVE-2009-4031
  • CVE-2009-4138
  • CVE-2009-4141
  • CVE-2009-4308
  • CVE-2009-4536
  • CVE-2009-4538
  • CVE-2010-0003
  • CVE-2010-0006
  • CVE-2010-0007
  • CVE-2010-0291

The details of each of these CVEs can be obtained at Secunia Advisories.

Users of the above mentioned distributions are recommended to update their kernel images to to above mentioned versions. Please note that a reboot will be required following the update. Canonical also mentions that all third-party kernel modules will most likely require recompilation and reinstall following the update to the kernel.