Display Suppliers’ Production Numbers Support Upcoming Increase In iPad 2 Shipments

iPad 2 docked

Last week, DigiTimes reported  that Apple is looking to ship 12-14 million iPad 2s during the third quarter of 2011, and now a new report backs that prediction up  with claims that Apple’s touch panel suppliers shipped out five million units in June and plan to produce five million more in July.

Five million touch sensors for the iPad 2 will be shipped in July, according to sources with Apple’s supply chain.

Shipments in June were also five million, with TPK Holding and Wintek supplying 1.4-1.6 million units each and the remaining by Cando, Sintek Photronic and Chimei Innolux (CMI), the sources indicated.

Rumors have suggested that Apple has had a tough time meeting customer demand due to the display production. TPK and Wintek used to supply Apple’s suppliers, but since then Apple has added more suppliers to meet its production goals.  In addition, rumor has it that  Apple has said to be buying up 60% of the global supply for touch panels for 2011.

App Store For iPad Now 100,000 Apps Strong

100,000 iPad apps

With the introduction of iPad, Apple also introduced an App Store specifically for iPad-specific apps. A little more than one year after, MacStories reports that  the App Store for iPad now offers over 100,000 iPad-specific applications.

Apple and third-party developers have set a new record: in 453 days since the original iPad came out on April 3, 2010, the App Store has more than 100,000 iPad-exclusive apps available. Either specifically targeting the tablet, or released as universal updates to existing iPhone apps, at the moment of writing this there are 100,161 iPad apps in the Store. How do I know? The App Store app itself on my iPad shows that.

In comparison, none of Apple’s competitors offer  more than a couple hundred tablet-optimized apps. For example, the Motorola Xoom  has been on the market for months, but still only offers a few hundred apps. Even a year after iPad’s launch,  Apple still has a tremendous lead in the tablet market and competitors are still having a hard time catching up.

iOS5 Will Not Allow Downgrades to iOS4

If you are an , or user who has been jailbreaking your device, here is some bad news. The upcoming iOS5 will not allow users to downgrade to an earlier version of the OS out of the box.

Also Read: iOS 5 – Everything You Need to Know About It

A new post by The Dev-Team says that Apple is using a new technology in the iOS5 which will disallow users from downgrading to a lower version of iOS. Jailbreakers have usually had an option to backup their SHSH blobs in case something goes wrong with the update. They could then use the SHSH blob to downgrade their iPhone or iPod Touch to a older version.

It looks like Apple is about to aggressively combat the replay attacksthat have until now allowed users to use iTunes to restore to previous firmware versions using saved SHSH blobs.

Those of you who have been jailbreaking for a while have probably heard us periodically warn you to save your blobsfor each firmware using either Cydia or TinyUmbrella (or even the copy from /tmp during restoremethod for advanced users).  Saving your blobs for a given firmware on your specific device allows you to restore *that* device to *that* firmware even after Apple has stopped signing it.  That’s all about to change.

Starting with the iOS5 beta, the role of the APTicketis changing — it’s being used much like the BBTickethas always been used.  The LLB and iBoot stages of the boot sequence are being refined to depend on the authenticity of the APTicket, which is uniquely generated at each and every restore (in other words, it doesn’t depend merely on your ECID and firmware version…it changes every time you restore, based partly on a random number).  This APTicket authentication will happen at every boot, not just at restore time.  Because only Apple has the crypto keys to properly sign the per-restore APTicket, replayed APTickets are useless.

This will only affect restores starting at iOS5 and onward, and Apple will be able to flip that switch off and on at will (by opening or closing the APTicket signing window for that firmware, like they do for the BBTicket). 

Starting with iOS5, Apple will be using a new technology which they can turn on and off at will. This will limit the device from being restored to an earlier version. However, all is not lost yet since the Dev-Team says that tethered jailbreaks will still be possible and users would be able to downgrade to an earlier version provided they use an older version of iTunes, so don’t delete those old installers yet.

geohot’s limera1n exploit occurs before any of this new checking is done, so tethered jailbreaks will still always be possible for devices where limera1n applies. Also, restoring to pre-5.0 firmwares with saved blobs will still be possible (but you’ll soon start to need to use older iTunes versions for that). Note that iTunes ultimately is *not* the component that matters here..it’s the boot sequence on the device starting with the LLB.

Apple has always been playing games with jailbreakers by watching over them and quickly releasing patches when an exploit is discovered and used for jailbreaking. Apple has also gone out and released unlocked iPhone 4 in the market. This might be aimed at controlling the unlocked iPhone market which is achieved through jailbreaking. With the introduction of iOS5, Apple might be hoping to restrict jailbreaking completely, even though it is legal.

Skype iPad App Coming Soon

It appears that the incredibly popular video chatting application Skype is finally making its way to the iPad. While that news isn’t very surprising, the fact that Skype confirmed it to TUAW is.

After a video of the upcoming Skype iPad App leaked out earlier today, the Apple bloggers began digging and speculating on what it meant. Some rightly questions the legitimacy of the the video, while others began questioning the team at Skype. TUAW got ahold of Rick Osterloh, the VP of Consumer Product Design at Skype, to ask him about the pending app.

According to the post, the feature list for the Skype iPad app is pretty complete when compared to the PC/Mac app, with a few exceptions. The most notable missing feature is file sharing, which reportedly wasn’t feasible to implement at this time.

It has been speculated since the announcement of the iPad 2, with its built in cameras, that Skype would release an app designed specifically for the tablet. If the video is legitimate, then what they have at this point it absolutely stunning.

Skype iPad App Coming Soon

There is no official word on a release date for the app, but we will certainly post when that information becomes available. As of now, the rumors are that Apple is due to approve the Skype app anytime. Expect to see it in the App Store very soon.

iPad Accounts for 89% of Worldwide Web Traffic, 97% of US

Non-computer Share May '11A new report by comScore, details a  new metric for tracking web traffic by device and connection type. According to the report, iPad was responsible for 89% of worldwide tablet traffic in May, continuing to dominate the market it defined last year.

The iPad is currently the dominant tablet device across all geographies, contributing more than 89 percent of tablet traffic across all markets. The iPad’s contribution to total non-computer device traffic is highest in Canada (33.5 percent). Brazil has the second highest non-computer device share of traffic coming from the iPad at 31.8 percent, although non-computer devices account for less than 1 percent of total traffic in the country. In Singapore, where non-computer devices comprise nearly 6 percent of total traffic, the iPad accounts for 26.2 percent of this traffic.

The calculations show that the iPad accounted nearly 97% of non-computer traffic share  in the United States, and Android taking nearly all of the rest of the market.

In addition, comScore reports that  53% of non-computer device traffic comes from Apple devices: 23.5% from iPhone, 21.8% from iPad, and 7.8% from iPod touch. Android comes in second place with  over 36% of the market. Lately, a lot of Android tablets have begun to flood the tablet market but none have been able to break Apple’s dominance on the market.

Hacker Pleads Guilty In AT&T iPad Breach


WSJ reports that Daniel Spliter has pleaded guilty  to two felony charges related to the publishing of 120,000 AT&T customers’ email addresses on Gawker.com. In addition, one other member from the hacking group “Goatse Security”, Andrew Auernheimer, was charged as well.

A computer hacker admitted Thursday to writing code that was used to breach AT&T Inc.’s servers last year and gather email addresses and other personal information of about 120,000 users of Apple Inc.’s iPad.

Daniel Spitler, 26 years old, a computer hacker from San Francisco, pleaded guilty to identity theft and conspiracy to gain unauthorized access to computers.

The breach occurred last June. The hackers discovered a  security hole on AT&T’s website that allowed users to plug in a SIM card identifier called an ICC-ID, and were able to receive back the email address associated with that SIM card. More than 114,000 email were disclosed.

Court Order Denies Samsung Preview of iPad 3 and iPhone 5

The lawsuits war between Apple and Samsung has been going on for a long time. Apple first filed suit against Samsung in April, claiming that the Samsung Galaxy line too closely imitated the look and feel of its iOS devices. Samsung then fired back at Apple, filing 10 different patent infringement claims against Apple over the iPhone and the iPad.

Samsung Apple LawsuitIn May, Samsung’s lawyers demanded that they wanted to see Apple’s future products because devices like the Droid Charge and Galaxy Tab 10.1  will presumably be in the market at the same time as the iPhone 5 and iPad 3, and they want to evaluate any possible similarities so they can prepare for further potential legal action from Apple. The request came after the court ordered Samsung to show prototypes of its new, already-announced devices to Apple.

As expected, the U.S. Circuit judge yesterday denied Samsung’s request to preview iPad 3 and iPhone 5. In her 11 page order, Judge Lucy Koh tried to explain in detail the reasons for which Samsung’s request was rejected.

The Court concludes that Samsung has not shown good cause to justify expedited discovery of Apple’s future products, packaging, and packaging inserts. Samsung’s motion to compel is therefore DENIED. As noted above, the Court nonetheless believes that Samsung should be entitled to parity in discovery directed at Apple’s potential  preliminary injunction motion. If Samsung had requested reasonable discovery along the lines discussed at the hearing on Apple’s motion for expedited discovery, the Court would have granted the request. However, as Samsung has not requested such discovery in this motion, the Court  cannot order it. In any case, it appears that Apple may be willing to provide such discovery without the need for Court intervention

Judge also noted that, Samsung’s claim of prejudice was undermined to some extent by evidence that Samsung has already released images and samples of its forthcoming products to the media and members of the public.” iPad 3 and iPhone 5 on the other hand are only rumours based on media reports and given iPad 2 was launched earlier this year, there is very little chance of Apple releasing iPad 3 anytime soon.

Everything was not good for Apple though. A part of judge’s order hinted that Apple may not get an injunction against Samsung unless it provides the iPhone 5 or the iPad 3 to the court for evaluation. It means, Samsung can continue to sell its mobile devices in the U.S. and is not under any pressure to reach a settlement in this case.

You can read the full order here:

Court Order Denying Motion Re iPhone 5 iPad 3

NYPost.com Blocks Users Who Try To Access Site Via Safari On iPad

NYPost iPad app message

The New York Post has started to block iPad users who access their site via Safari.app. Now when you access their site via Safari.app on iPad, a message tells you to download their iPad app. In my opinion, this is a response to the new feature Apple introduced in iOS 5; “Safari Reader“. Safari Reader eliminates ads and offers the user a clean reading experience, and possibly costing ad revenue for news corporations. Also, if you try and access their site in Opera for iPad or Skyfire the site isn’t blocked.

Thanks for coming! NYPOST.com editorial content is now only accessible on the iPad through the New York Post App. If you are a current New York Post App subscriber, please visit the App Store and download the latest version to access NYPOST.com through the INDEX. If you are not a current New York Post App user and would like to subscribe, please download from theApp Store. Thank you.

The rates for subscription are $6.99 per month,  $39.99 for six months or $79.99 for the year. Unfortunately, there’s no way to purchase single-issues. In addition, NYPost has received lots of negative feedback for their decision. Hopefully other  news corporations don’t follow their game plan.


Another “i”, Another Dispute. Apple Sued by Publisher over iBooks Trademark

It’s just another trademark dispute Apple faces. This time it is publisher John T. Colby who filed a case against Apple for the use of the name “iBooks”.

The suit was filed by J.T. Colby and Co. in U.S. Southern District Court for New York. It indicates that Colby purchased assets of various entities in 2006 and 2007 from Byron Preiss, a New York Publisher who had published more than 1,000 books under the “ibooks” brand starting in 1999. The “ibooks” imprint was named “America’s fastest growing small publisher” by Publishers Weekly in 2004.

Colby believes that Apple using the name iBooks will devalue his products that use the same term. He claims that the use of the term infringes on his ability to use the ‘ibooks’ and ‘ipicturebook’ trademarks.

Apple’s use of the mark ‘iBooks’ to denote the electronic library that can be accessed via its iPad tablet computer and its iPhone is likely to overwhelm the good will of plaintiffs’ ‘ibooks’ and ‘ipicturebooks’ marks and render them virtually worthless,


United States Patent and Trademark Office (USTPO) search reveals that Apple has a trademark of its own for iBooks (75182820), relating to “computer (hardware and) software used to support and create interactive, user-modifiable electronic booksfrom back in 1996. Apple had launched the first iBook laptop in July 1999 and was replaced by the MacBook in 2006.

This could get tricky. Both parties calim to have a trademark for the same term, “iBooks”. Apple, however, has declined to comment on this.

Last week, Apple was sued over the iCloud trademark by a phoenix-based voice over IP company called iCloud Communications.

Watch out Apple, Facebook is Gearing Up to Launch Its Mobile App Store

Back when Facebook announced its Open Graph Protocol, I wrote that Mark Zuckerberg is a helluva ambitious bloke. He doesn’t want Facebook to be just another website we use every day, he wants Facebook to become an integral and essential part of our daily lives. Open Graph enabled Facebook to weave itself into the fabric of the web, and collect huge amounts of data on our preferences and interests.

FacebookNow, if TechCrunch is to be believed, Facebook is working on a new platform aimed squarely at mobile users. The new platform, codenamed Project Spartan, will leverage HTML5 and other web technologies to deliver mobile applications and games. The initial target will be iOS devices (iPhones and iPads running Mobile Safari). However, given that it will essentially be a HTML5 based platform, it shouldn’t be too hard to extend Project Spartan to Android and other mobile platforms.

According to the report, there are about 80 outside developers currently working with Facebook on Project Spartan. Facebook will essentially act as a wrapper around these apps, and support sharing options and monetary transactions (through Facebook Credits). The app developers are expected to roll in their applications within the next couple of weeks, in preparation for the impending launch of Facebook’s app store.

Mobile app stores are blossoming and even the little known ones like Opera Mobile Store are pulling in hundreds of thousands of downloads per day. Given its huge user base and cross-platform presence, Facebook obviously believes that this is another segment it can compete in. While browser based apps have the advantage of being cross-platform, the lack of system level access (access to APIs) will also make them restricted in many ways. Facebook’s app store won’t be able to outperform or eliminate Apple’s App Store and Android’s Market. However, it doesn’t need do. Even if it succeeds in grabbing a decent percentage of users, Project Spartan will be a lucrative platform that will steal a significant amount of revenue from the likes of Apple. And of course, it will give Facebook foothold in another segment that initially seemed to have little to do with the social network.