and Hacked to Protest Against SOPA by UGNazi Group

It looks like the SOPA war is getting bigger with another new group called UGNazi stepping in and hacking sites which support SOPA. The group has currently hacked and to protest SOPA and are going to hack more sites in retaliation.

All the three sites are currently redirecting to a site called which was created yesterday. It is not clear as to whether this is a new group or another form of Anonymous who have been taking down websites like that of FBI, CIA and more to retaliate government control and shutdown of sites like Megaupload.

Also Read: An Interview with an OpDarknet Anon

Over the past few days, Megaupload was shut down by FBI and several other file sharing websites pulled the trigger on themselves with FileSonic stopping downloads, blocking the U.S. users and several other file sharing websites shutting operations.

The UGNazi group had earlier hacked website and is against the SOPA from USA and ACTA bill from Europe which are draconian piracy bills in their current form.

We understand that these websites will enevitably (sic) take back their website.
We don’t steal users data, only here to make them aware.
From SOPA/PIPA, to ACTA to just pissing us off…there is always a reason

It is unclear if the group is associated with Anonymous, but it looks like their motives are same. SOPA, PIPA and now ACTA have definitely stirred quite a few users on the internet and we will definitely keep seeing more such attacks in the future.

Story developing….

Anonymous Strikes, Releases Confidential Documents Belonging to FBI Contractor ManTech International

Anonymous, working together with LulzSec and other hackers, has struck again. As a part of its Operation Antisec, Anonymous has released close to 400 megabytes of documents belonging to FBI contractor ManTech International. Ironically enough, ManTech proudly claims to specialize in tackling some of the most challenging cyber security problems facing our nation.

In the recent past, Anonymous and LulzSec have been actively targeted by law enforcement agencies around the world. FBI alone arrested 16 suspected Anonymous members earlier this month. In response, Anonymous has continued to strike high profile targets such as defense contractor Booz Allen Hamilton and NATO.

The documents leaked by Anonymous include everything from photographs to income statements and strategic plans. Last year FBI had outsourced its cyber security responsibilities to ManTech for $100 million. However, it’s not the sole federal agency that is served by ManTech. National Security Agency, U.S. Navy, Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Defense Intelligence Agency are some of the other esteemed clients of ManTech. In fact, an overwhelming proportion of the leaked documents pertain to NATO. ManTech was also possibly chosen because of its involvement in the planned smear campaign against WikiLeaks (dubbed Operation MetalGear), along with HBGary.

ManTech’s Official Response

It’s unclear exactly how much the recent spate of arrests has hurt Anonymous. Earlier this week, UK Police claimed to arrest Topiary, one of the major forces behind LulzSec. However, recent reports suggest that the law enforcement agencies might have been carefully and intentionally mislead into arresting the wrong person. However, one thing that is clear is that Anonymous doesn’t have any intention of giving up.

#Antisec Release

Anonymous & LulzSec Tell FBI To Go Fish

Over the past couple of days the FBI has been making arrests in and around New York City with regards to the PayPal breach carried out by Anonymous back in December 2010. Over 14 people were arrested on Tuesday and several more searches are underway.

Back in December 2010, Anonymous had attacked PayPal because they had stopped or closed down accounts of . The shutdown was done because of the leak of classified U.S. documents by Wikileaks. After the PayPal breach, Anonymous continued destructing several other websites including those of MasterCard and Visa.

Also Read: Editorial: LulzSec, AntiSec and Why the Internet is a Sadder Place Now

The FBI had been on trail of suspects since a long time, but they final managed to make some arrests after almost 8 months. However, the arrests have hardly shaken Anonymous and the recently notorious LulzSec, who have grown in popularity over the past few months and had also recently attacked Rupert Murdoch’s newspapers because of the phone hacking scandal.

In a open letter to the FBI, Anonymous and LulzSec have basically asked the FBI to F*** Off. The response came after the deputy assistant FBI director Steven Chabinsky gave the following statement to NPR;

"We want to send a message that chaos on the Internet is unacceptable,  [even if] hackers can be believed to have social causes, it’s entirely  unacceptable to break into websites and commit unlawful acts."

The hacktivists replied to this message by arguing that Governments are lying to their citizens and trying to keep them into control and curtailing their freedom. Along with that, Corporations and lobbyists are conspiring with the Governments while collecting billions in funds for federal contracts.

They have also clearly stated that the "governments and corporations are their enemy" and they will continue to fight them. Additionally, Anonymous and LulzSec seem to have no fear in this world anymore and are claiming to be unstoppable;

We are not scared any more. Your threats to arrest us are meaningless to us as you cannot arrest an idea. Any attempt to do so will make your citizens more angry until they will roar in one gigantic choir. It is our mission to help these people and there is nothing – absolutely nothing – you can possibly to do make us stop.

This is definitely a direct attack on the FBI and their security and will ensure a cat-and-mouse game between the government and the hacktivists. It is definitely not the end and the authorities will have to fight a painful battle on the internet against people they might never be able to catch.

Also Read: LulzSec Takes Down Website, Forwards Prank Calls to FBI

The drama is yet to unfold. The next few months or years will show how this will pan out and who will win the battle. In the meantime, you can read the entire Anonymous & Lulz Security Statement below:

Hello thar FBI and international law authorities,

We recently stumbled across the following article with amazement and a certain amount of amusement:

The statements made by deputy assistant FBI director Steve Chabinsky in this article clearly seem to be directed at Anonymous and Lulz Security, and we are happy to provide you with a response.

You state:

  "We want to send a message that chaos on the Internet is unacceptable,   [even if] hackers can be believed to have social causes, it’s entirely   unacceptable to break into websites and commit unlawful acts."

Now let us be clear here, Mr. Chabinsky, while we understand that you and your colleagues may find breaking into websites unacceptable, let us tell you what WE find unacceptable:

* Governments lying to their citizens and inducing fear and terror to keep them in control by dismantling their freedom piece by piece.

* Corporations aiding and conspiring with said governments while taking advantage at the same time by collecting billions of funds for federal contracts we all know they can’t fulfil.

* Lobby conglomerates who only follow their agenda to push the profits higher, while at the same time being deeply involved in governments around the world with the only goal to infiltrate and corrupt them enough so the status quo will never change.

These governments and corporations are our enemy. And we will continue to fight them, with all methods we have at our disposal, and that certainly includes breaking into their websites and exposing their lies.

We are not scared any more. Your threats to arrest us are meaningless to  us as you cannot arrest an idea. Any attempt to do so will make your citizens more angry until they will roar in one gigantic choir. It is our mission to help these people and there is nothing – absolutely nothing – you can possibly to do make us stop.

  "The Internet has become so important to so many people that we have to ensure that the World Wide Web does not become the Wild Wild West."

Let me ask you, good sir, when was the Internet not the Wild Wild West? Do you really believe you were in control of it at any point? You were not.

That does not mean that everyone behaves like an outlaw. You see, most people do not behave like bandits if they have no reason to. We become bandits on the Internet because you have forced our hand. The Anonymous bitchslap rings
through your ears like hacktivism movements of the 90s. We’re back – and we’re not going anywhere. Expect us.

Editorial: LulzSec, AntiSec and Why the Internet is a Sadder Place Now

About thirteen hours prior to the writing of this piece, a very special surprise bootywas dropped by the infamous hackergroup LulzSec, over Twitter. The 50 Days of Lulzstatement and the accompanying torrent link with their last bountiful booty of 812,000 emails, AOL and AT&T internal dataand some other random information hacked off several servers, signified the end of the six-man self-appointed hacktivist group.


Their almost poetic farewell message was all about saying how much they cared about the very people they chose to disrupt, and how the world is a better place now since they have shown how a common man can spread anarchy so easily (emphasis added):-

We are Lulz Security, and this is our final release, as today marks something meaningful to us.

For the past 50 days we’ve been disrupting and exposing corporations, governments, often the general population itself, and quite possibly everything in between, just because we could. All to selflessly entertain others – vanity, fame, recognition, all of these things are shadowed by our desire for that which we all love. The raw, uninterrupted, chaotic thrill of entertainment and anarchy. It’s what we all crave, even the seemingly lifeless politicians and emotionless, middle-aged self-titled failures. You are not failures. You have not blown away. You can get what you want and you are worth having it, believe in yourself.

While we are responsible for everything that The Lulz Boat is, we are not tied to this identity permanently. Behind this jolly visage of rainbows and top hats, we are people. People with a preference for music, a preference for food; we have varying taste in clothes and television, we are just like you.

Together, united, we can stomp down our common oppressors and imbue ourselves with the power and freedom we deserve.

So with those last thoughts, it’s time to say bon voyage. Our planned 50 day cruise has expired, and we must now sail into the distance…

Extremely magnanimous of these fellows, is it not? These fine gentlemen showed us that a small bunch of people could bring the world down to its knees, all through open exploits and SQL vulnerabilities that anyone can search for from the comforts of their establishments.


I would have tapped my hat respectfully at LulzSec if I did not know more about the entire debacle of the past fifty days.

Actually, no, I would not have tapped my hat respectfully at LulzSec at all. If I did, my name would be OddJob and I would be throwing my hat at them. Why? Because LulzSec was never a hackergroup it was a group that used to search for known exploits online, and then use them to take down, deface and otherwise maim a server or a company. In the event that there was no known exploit, they would rely on Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks using the Low Orbit Ion Cannon (LOIC) to take down a website. All of this in the name of lulzand, later, antisec/wikileaks movement.