Tag Archives: Google Music

Google Music Introduces Free Song Matching Feature in the US

Google-MusicGoogle Music hasn’t exactly set the world on fire as Google was hoping it would. However, there is no denying that it is a pretty neat service. It’s biggest selling point is perhaps the free digital locker that could store up to 20,000 songs in the cloud. Unfortunately, before you could use the digital locker, you had to manually upload your media library. Even with a conservative estimate of 5 MB per song, we are looking at 100 gigs of data transfer for 20,000 songs. Obviously, this could take a while.

The good news is that starting today, users won’t have to upload their library before being able to access it through the cloud. Thanks to the newly introduced song matching feature, Google will simply cross-reference song signatures before unlocking access to that song in the cloud. Google’s desktop app called Music Manager will take care of syncing songs from your PC to the cloud. This feature was available for European users for over a month, but was enabled for US users only a few hours back.

Google’s competition also boasts of a similar feature; however, Google is the only one to offer it for free. Apple charges $24.99 for iTunes Match services and stores up to 25,000 songs. Amazon’s Cloud Player Premium also charges the same amount, but it can store up to 250,000 songs. Amazon also offers a free version, which is limited to 250 songs.

The Scan and Match service has long been dubbed as a sin tax. Since none of the service providers attempt to validate the source of the music file, it’s assumed that a lot of the tracks in the users library are illegally sourced. Apple and Amazon pay out most of its subscription fee to publishers as a compensation. AllThingsD is reporting that Google also has a deal in place with record labels. However, instead of paying them on a per-user basis, it’s offering a hefty upfront payment.

Ubuntu Unveils Web Music Streaming Service

It’s official, Ubuntu has rolled out a Web Music addition to their Ubuntu One service.

An addition to the Ubuntu One “cloud service” now allows all users with a paid subscription to save, store and stream music directly from a web browser. After logging into your  UbuntuOne  control panel, there is a new tab showing off the features, which include offline listening, access to the vast Ubuntu One Music Store and 20GB of storage, with a monthly subscription. Of course there is also a 30 day free trial for the service should you want to try before you buy.

Previous to today, the service was only available from a mobile device running iOS or Android. A free app, available in both the Apple App Store and the Android Market, provided mobile users with a way to stream and access all the content stored in their cloud. Although users have access to the iTunes Cloud and Google Music on their respective handsets, many use alternatives that provide “personalized  radio” based on recommendations, tag matching and “crowdsourced” content such as Spotify and Pandora. Unfortunately UbuntuOne Web Music does not include this, but playlist creation, queue management and shuffle might be enough for you.


It really does seem as if Ubuntu is laying the framework and infrastructure for eventually providing a mobile operating system or partnering with an OEM for shipping U1 services directly on devices. They have a niche market with Ubuntu installations on many personal computers, they have cross-platform sync through a proven cloud service that allows file storage, contact and note sync, and now completely cross-platform music streaming.

Ubuntu says they will continue building out their One service and 2012 will be a big year. The mobile space has been heating up for a long time, and although there might not be any room for a new platform, providing tightly integrated services could be a real differentiating factor for many OEMs. Hopefully Canonical sees this opportunity and can seize it, truly bringing Ubuntu to the masses.

Download The Latest Google Music and Android Market APK

Early in the morning today, Google rolled out its much awaited Music store for Android users in the United States. The Music store from Google has some nice features, instead of just being another music store from a giant, lilke the ability to share music with your Google+ friends, Free song of the day and Music Hub for Indie artists.

The Google Music store will be available to all Android 2.2+ handset owners living in the United States. Android users need to make sure they have the latest version of the Android Market (v3.3.11), otherwise they need to wait until the market update hits their phone.

Users also need to update the Google Music app from the Android Market, before they can fully enjoy the Music store from the big G. The new version of the Google Music brings an Ice Cream Sandwich like UI (Read: MUCH better), and integration with the Android Market.

Readers can either wait for the update to show up on their handset, or they can alternatively download the latest version of the Android Market and Google Music APK from here and here, respectively.

Google’s Music Store Goes Live; Allows You To Share Your Purchased Tracks With Your Friends

Google has just announced its much rumored and talked about Music store, here at an event in States.

The Google Music service from the giant will be available for its Android users to enjoy directly from the Android Market. All major labels including Universal, EMI and Sony along with many Indie artists are on-board, except for Warner Music group.

All the music will be hosted on the cloud at 320Kbps MP3 file format, without any DRM. Users also get a 90-second preview of the song, before purchasing it. Google Music will also offer its users access to some exclusive tracks from many popular artists like Coldplay, Pear Jam and Rolling Stones. Busta Rhymes will be releasing his new album exclusively on Google Music.

The most interesting part about Google Music is its Song Sharing feature. After purchasing a particular song or album from the Google Music store, users can share that song or album with their friends via Google+. Your friends will get to listen to the full song or album which you shared only once. Like earlier rumored, there will also be a free song of the day thing on store, similar to Amazon’s App Store.

The service will be available for all Android 2.2+ handset owners in the United States, only! Google did not mention anything about bringing the service to any other region of the world.

Google Music App APK From Android Ice Cream Sandwich Leaks Online!

Even though the Nexus Prime and Ice Cream Sandwich are not being announced on October 11, a lot of pictures and a video of the handset and the upcoming OS leaked today.

Now, making the day even better are the guys behind Android Police. They have somehow (I wonder how?!?) have managed to get their hands on a lost Nexus Prime on Verizon’s network. They have been playing around with the phone, and have managed to extract some of the upcoming ICS goodies for us Gingerbread users.

First they posted about the new Google+ app coming with ICS, and now they have posted a short walkthrough of the new music app coming in the next Android version. In fact, they have even uploaded the APK for us general Droid users to download and try.

UI wise, there are not many changes in Google Music 4.0.1. The whole UI looks the same as v3, except it has some tweaks which make it much more usable and visually pleasing. The bad news is that new build of Google Music does not seem to work with Google’s cloud based music service.

Interested Android users can head over to Android Police to find more screenshots and download link of the Google Music APK.

Facebook To Launch Music Service

Facebook has partnered with Spotify and is planning to launch a music service. The service will allow Facebook users to listen songs with friends at the same time. It is expected to launch in two weeks time.

Spotify

The integrated service is currently going through testing phase. Once launched, Facebook users will see a Spotify icon appear on the left side of their newsfeed, along with the usual icons. By clicking on the Spotify icon, the service will be installed on the users’ desktop and will grant access to millions of songs in Spotify’s library.

The service is currently unnamed. It may be called as “Facebook Music” and will be available only in those countries where Spotify is supported. Bad news for folks in US.

Spotify is already integrated with Facebook Connect, allowing users to see what their Facebook friends are listening to and share playlists and recommend songs. It is said that the new service will allow users listen to music with friends at the same time.

If Facebook launches this service, Spotify will eventually increase its user-base and the service could possibly be a competitor to Google Music.

(via Forbes )

Google Music Invite – Scam

Google Music, a platform that allows users to upload their music collection to an online personal library from where they can listen and download it to a device that is connected to the Internet.

Google Music Beta

Google Music is currently in Beta and the service is available on a limited, invite-only basis in the U.S. only. There are scammers who are offering “free Google Music Beta invite” which you should probably avoid clicking such links.

Mashable inquired with a Google representative.

Any person or website claiming to be giving awayGoogle Music invites is lying, a fact we’ve just confirmed with Google representatives. Because of the way invites are handed out, they’re linked to specific Google Accounts. In other words, one person can’t request an invite and pass it on; the invite has to be requested and accepted by the same Google Account.

Just be sure that you don’t fall for this trap. If you come across links for Google Music invites, don’t click them. Don’t bother sharing them on social networking sites or anywhere else. If you’re a US resident, then the only way you can request for an invite is from http://music.google.com/about/

Google Music, Books And Movies Services Goes Live!

Google has just announced three new media related services at the Google I/O Google Books, Google Movies and Google Music.

Users can purchase any book from the Google market, and read it on any Google Books compatible device.

Android users can rent movies for 1.99$ for up to 30 days. After renting a movie and watching it for some time, users have 24 hours to watch the whole movie. Users can stream movies, in HD quality; to any device they wish to including Google TV, Android Honeycomb tablets etc.

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Honeycomb based tablets will get a special app dedicated to Google Movies, with the Android 3.1 Honeycomb update. The service is also available for Android 2.2+ based handsets. Google has also added two new sections to the Android Market Books and Movies.

The Google Music service also went live, after months of speculation. The Music site is already up, and sadly the service is invitation based only. The Google Music service will allow users to stream their whole music library to their Android tablet or handset, via a Google Music app for Windows/Mac. Basically, once a user adds his music library to the Google Music app, his whole library is uploaded to the cloud.

Users can add up to 20,000 songs as well! The service will remain free, until it is in beta. Sadly, the service is only for people residing in the U.S.

Google has also released a new music app for the Android 2.2+ handsets, which can be downloaded from the Android market.

How To Get Invites For Google Music Beta

Earlier Today, Google launched Google Music at Google I/O 2011. The new music service will seamlessly integrate with mobiles and Android tablets.

google_music_beta_invites

Sadly, the service will be limited to US only for the initial period and there is no information on when it will be rolled out to other countries. Google Music is a service which gives you access to your personal music collection without the need to use wires or sync. You can add your music collection to Google music and access it from the web or any other compatible Android device.

If you are interested in trying out the new service, you can request a beta invite for the service by visiting http://music.google.com. You can learn more about Google Music by visiting this page.

Google Music Page Goes Live; Available Only In The U.S.

Google I/O is going to kick-start in just half an hour from now, and the Google Music page is already live!

It was very well known that Google will be launching Google Music’, a cloud based music storage and player for all Android Gingerbread based phones and Honeycomb based tablets. As with any Google product, the service is in Beta right now.

Also, the service is in Invite only mode for now. So, readers interested in Google Music need to request for an invitation first. The Google Music page also states that the service is free only for a limited time.

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However, the biggest issue with Google Music is that it is only available to the people living in the United States. I seriously did not expect this from Google. There is a world outside the United States, and they also deserve their share of cloud based music player.

The Google Music is the second cloud based music player to pop-up on the Internet, after Amazon unveiled its cloud based music player a couple of months ago.