View Google Images Faster with clickGOOGLEview Chrome Extension

clickGOOGLEview-install-icon I think it’s safe to say that most people use Google Image Search when it’s time to look for images they want. There are many other image search engines, such as Imagery, Yahoo Image Search, Ask Images Search, MSN Live Image Search, AltaVista Image Search, but Google Image Search is the most widely known.

I haven’t seen very many complaints about the way Google Image Search works, but any trick I can use to find images there is always welcome. Now I’ll tell you about the latest trick I’ve learned. There’s a cool Chrome browser extension called clickGOOGLEview which lets you quickly see full size images you’ve found.

Normally while searching, you’ll see rows of image thumbnails for the search results.


When you click on a thumbnail, you are taken to another thumbnail image and a copy of the web page it is displayed on. You have to click a link labeled See full size imageto see the full size version of the image.


Once you’ve installed the clickGOOGLEview extension in the Chrome web browser, clicking on the image thumbnail on the results page opens up the full size image in a new tab. This saves an extra click and it also makes it easier to return to your search results.


Get the clickGOOGLEview extension.

That may not sound like a big time saver, but if you use it often, you will save big chunks of time. This is true, especially when you consider that you normally have to hit the back button in your browser to return to your search results.

If you use Google’s Chrome browser and Google Image Search, the clickGOOGLEview extension is something you’ll learn to love. If this extension isn’t something you need, be sure to check out our list of the Best Google Chrome Extensions and our reviews of other popular Chrome Extensions.

Post To Tumblr From Google Chrome [Chrome Extensions]

We have talked about the various ways through which you can post to Tumblr; through the desktop, mobiles or browsers. Putting stuff on tumblr is so easy, that you can also do it through email and a phone. However, all that aside, right now I have two Google Chrome extensions to tell you about.

Tumblr Dashboard Tumblr Dashboard: the Tumblr Dashboard extension for Google Chrome brings together the Tumblr interface for iPhone and the Tumblr bookmarklet for the web. If you need to see your dashboard quickly, see it through the iPhone interface. If you need to post content, you get the bookmarklet interface. In the dashboard mode, clicking on a post shows you details such as number of notes and options like the ability to like and reblog a post. If you click on a picture thumbnail, the extension will enlarge it for you.

Share on Tumblr: If you just want a quick and easy way to post content, the Share on Tumblr extension might be what you are looking for. It gives you the same features of the Tumblr bookmarklet, in fact, all the extension does is load the bookmarklet in a frame. You can choose this option if you like a fixed placement for the frame and want an interface the feels native to the browser, as compared the bookmarklet.

Google Launches New 3D Graphics Layer Engine For Chrome

WebGL-OpenGL-Google-Angle While, Microsoft is busy playing catch-up, Google is determined to stay on the cutting-edge. It has launched a new open source project dubbed ANGLE (Almost Native Graphics Layer Engine), which will enhance Chrome’s graphics rendering capabilities.

In very simple terms, the goal of ANGLE is to permit execution of WebGL content in Windows systems by utilising DirectX 9.0. WebGL is a cross platform API which can be leveraged by web applications to serve hardware accelerated 3D graphics within the browser.

The trouble with WebGL is that it relies on the OpenGL ES 2.0 API. Once upon a time OpenGL was considered a serious competitor to DirectX. However, in the recent years it has been decimated by Microsoft’s DirectX. So much so, most Windows systems do not even have the requisite OpenGL drivers installed. ANGLE project aims to work around this problem by implementing most of the OpenGL ES 2.0 API.

WebGL is still a young technology with limited support. Microsoft isn’t even a member of the working group and hasn’t showed any inclination to support WebGL in the future. In fact, given its long conflict with OpenGL, it is doubtful if Microsoft will ever warm up to WebGL. Nevertheless, Google obviously believes that technologies like WebGL, which are important for next-gen web applications, deserve a chance. It will be interesting to see if Google really succeeds in making a difference.

Google Chrome Gets Windows 7 Taskbar Previews

In addition to the Form AutoFill feature in the latest dev version of , the new dev version has also added support for taskbar previews.

If you hover over the Chrome icon in the taskbar you will see previews for all the open tabs as seen in the screenshot below.


This is definitely good, since users will now be able to quickly jump to a tab without having to open the actual window. The Windows 7 Taskbar preview is only available in the developer version of Google Chrome.

Google Chrome Gets Form AutoFill, Finally

The latest development version of has added a much required feature, called Form AutoFill. This was one of the most requested feature from the missing Google Toolbar for other browsers like IE and Firefox.

Google Chrome AutoFill

Just like the Google Toolbar, Google Chrome now allows you to set up profiles and enter Addresses and Credit cards details which you can then use to fill out long and inane forms :-).

Chrome Autofill Profiles

AutoFill is enabled by default in Chrome dev v5.0.356.0. You can also add profiles and enable or disable the AutoFill settings by visiting Options -> Personal Stuff.

DYK Thursday: Roundups and Some Tidbits

Okay, this is the fourth official DYK Thursday and I hope you people are enjoying reading what I write. This time it’s more of a collection of different things. You might have already read some of them. So, this is also a roundup of some amazing facts that we found out this week.

Everyone knows Twitter has a 140 character limit. But DYK that Facebook had a 420 character limit?!

Yes. You might already know this, if you are a regular reader here. Kieth has already written a post on this. (Click the link above). Keith came to know about this limit while he was trying to tell his friends about a feature request he wanted on Facebook, through his update. Bad luck, Keith! ;)

History of Twitter is Awesome!- A few facts about it

Ya, I know. History is boring always-but when it comes to Twitter you will crave for more. Tehseen has compiled some awesome set of facts about the history of Twitter like – Twitter was initially called as “Twttr”, Ashton Kutcher was the first tweep to get a million followers and many more. Go ahead and read the post!

Google Chrome has an extension to remove profanities from webpages!!

Google Chrome’s extension gallery is day by day getting filled with lots of extensions. Now, there is also an extension that “censors” the profanities on the web. The name of the extension is called “F Off”! Go ahead and install it if you have kids at home. [Thanks ChromeStory]

Google Chrome has an extension that does NOTHING!

Yes, you heard that right! This extension does nothing. Okay, you are asking me what’s the deal with it? It has about 1408 users and “weekly installs” of about 4823. Now, is it funny, ridiculous, WTF or what? Another point is, how did it get into the extension gallery?! ! Won’t Google check before accepting any addon? Leave your comments below. [Thanks ChromeStory]

Listen To Online Radio While Browsing The Web


For Google Chrome on Windows and Linux Only: The Chrome Radio extension for Google Chrome makes it much easier to playback online radio streams right inside the browser. The extension is very nifty, streamlined and fits smoothly in the browser without interfering with the user’s browsing experience.

Radio stations can be saved within the extension and can be organized in groups, or say, genres. You can also assign quick access keys to five of your stations so that your favorites stay at your fingertips. The extension keeps track of your most played stations and if you want, will also autoplay the last played station on browser startup. Import and Export of station database is also supported.

Coming to the source of media, you can add radio stations from sites like, and shoutcast. Just copy the playlist url (or stream url) from the webpage and add it to the extension. If you get lost, the extension should help you out with its FAQ page which highlights many questions such as how to add stations, where to find them et al.

Download Chrome Radio Player | Developer’s Website

Browser Saturday: Browser Security Woes, Firefox Account Manager, Opera Mini for Android and More

Welcome to another edition of Browser Saturday – the weekly roundup of all major browser related news. Without further ado let us get started.

Internet Explorer

This was a particularly rough week for Internet Explorer users. Early in the week, Microsoft released a security advisory warning users about a critical vulnerability in Internet Explorer 6 and 7, which could result in the execution of malicious code. Soon, multiple security product vendors confirmed that the vulnerability was indeed being exploited by hackers to attack unsuspecting users. To make matters worse Israeli researcher Moshe Ben Abu published the exploit code. Check out our original article to learn more about this issue.

Microsoft also tweaked the browser ballot screen – which has already given a boost to alternate browsers, to remove any inherent bias.


Rock-Your-FirefoxMozilla publically launched RockYourFirefox – a central repository for users looking to enhance their browsing experience. RockYourFirefox would regularly feature some of the best Firefox extensions along with reviews, feedback and insights from Firefox users around the web.

However, the most exciting development of the week was the announcement of Mozilla Account Manager. It is a new Mozilla Labs project, which aims to make managing accounts on different websites simpler by allowing users to sign-in/sign-out from the toolbar itself. Check out our in-depth coverage to get an idea about this possibly revolutionary product.

Mozilla also started pushing Firefox 3.6 more proactively to users, while continuing impressive work on the latest development builds.


This was a comparatively quiet week for Google Chrome. The most significant development was Google deciding to do away with the unique client ID present in all installations of the browser. In the future, Chrome will be getting rid of the unique identifier after the first automatic update check.

Although there weren’t a lot of new stuff from Google, there were plenty of new extensions. If you are a cricket fan, go ahead and install the IPL on YouTube extension for Chrome to get lives scores, commentary and match reminders.


OperaOpera Software had a fairly dramatic week thanks to all the hoopla about the malformed Content-Length header security issue. The initial proof of concept code turned out to be non-exploitable. However, a modified scenario presented by Secunia was (at least theoretically) revealed to be a security risk.

However, things were not all gloomy for Opera. Carakan JavaScript engine continued its impressive showing – it proved itself to be not only the fastest but also the best behaved.

Meanwhile, Opera Software kept churning out releases for various platforms. UNIX and MAC users received new 10.50 snapshots while Windows users got a chance to try out a 10.51 build. Opera Mini 5 beta for Android was also released this week.


Apple pushed through as many as 16 security updates for Safari, ahead of the Pwn2Own hacking contest.

Does Your Browser Behave? Find Out With Sputnik JavaScript Conformance Test Suite

You are probably familiar with the Acid3 test, which checks how well certain selected aspects of web standards (especially those related to the Document Object Model and JavaScript) are implemented by a browser. Now, the Chromium development team has released a similar benchmarking utility which can check how well a browser’s JavaScript engine behaves. The test runner is based on the Sputnik JavaScript conformance test suite which was launched last year.

Sputnik comprises of more than 5000 tests and touches all aspects of the JavaScript language defined in the third edition of the ECMA-262 specification. The results of the test are quite interesting. As expected, none of the browsers managed a perfect score. Opera 10.50 was the best performer with 78 failures, while Internet Explorer 8 was the worst performer with 463 failures. Safari 4, Chrome 4 and Firefox 3.6 recorded 159, 218 and 259 failures respectively.


Sputnik test itself is still in its infancy and will undoubtedly continue to evolve and mature with time. However, a standard test suite like this will definitely help browser manufacturers discover bugs and inconsistencies. Let us hope that browser manufacturers like Microsoft and Mozilla will take this test seriously and help in the evolution of a truly Open Web.

How to Add a Right Click Search to Chrome Browser

Would you like to be able to highlight a word or a phrase on a web page and find out more about it? You can make this possible by adding search entries to the right click (context) menu.

Recently, I’ve posted articles telling you how to Add a Right Click Search Menu to Firefox and Internet Explorer. You might think that I have a real searchaddiction. It’s not an addiction, it’s a real need that’s based on the desire to save time. I spend large chunks of time searching the net for the things I want to learn and write about.

Now I’ll show you how to add a context search menu to Google’s Chrome web browser. chrome

1. You must be running version 4 of Chrome or higher.

2. Go to the ChromeExtensions site and install Context Search.


3. To add your own custom search sites (providers), open the Extensions manager by using the Wrench pull-down menu.


4. Click on the Options button for Context Search.


5. In the preferences, you can add/remove and edit existing search providers. To add a new provider, click the Add newlink.


6. Here you can see how I’ve added my favorite search provider. Don’t forget to use the Savelink when you have everything entered. (read why I like Scroogle Search)


Tip: How do I get URLs like the ones shown above? I go to a website (such as Twitter) and perform a search there, using an easy to identify keyword (such as TESTSEARCH). Then I find the keyword and replace it with %s.

URL displayed in address bar after searching Twitter for TESTSEARCH

URL after replacing TESTSEARCH with %s

7. When you run across a word or phrase on a page, highlight it and you’ll see a little triangle beside the highlighted text. Click on it and you’ll see your search providers listed.


8. I’ve noticed that the little triangle doesn’t appear on some web pages. When that happens, right click on the highlighted text and you’ll see your customized search providers listed.


That’s all there is to it. Now you’re ready to beat Chuck Norris at searching. Oh, I forgot – Chuck Norris doesn’t search, the results come to him.   (bad joke)