How to Avoid Accidental TV Show Spoilers on Social Media [iOS, Android, Google Chrome]

Game of Thrones is back on TV, and has wasted no time in delivering the shocking game changers that it’s famous for. Over the past three seasons, the show has managed to amass a massive and vocal fan base. The HBO original based on the fantasy books “A Song of Ice and Fire” invariably manages to trend every week soon after it airs. However, for those of us who haven’t read the books and don’t watch the show during its initial broadcast, this poses a big challenge. Short of completely avoiding Twitter and Facebook, it’s almost impossible to remain spoiler free among all the #redwedding and #purplewedding chatter. Thankfully, as always, there’s a better and an easier solution!


The first option is an Android and iOS app called Spoiler Shield. It is actually a Twitter and Facebook client, which automatically hides everything on your stream about the TV series that you don’t want to get spoiled about. Spoiler Shield also supports NBA, NHL, MLB, NFL, and other sports and live events. It ships with a list of shields, and all you need to do is enable the ones that you want.


Spoiler Shield is well designed, intuitive, and easy to use. However, quite obviously, it can’t replace dedicated Facebook and Twitter clients. It probably isn’t even meant to do so. You should probably only use it when you’re weary of getting spoiled. For example, the day of the Academy Awards, the day Netflix releases House of Cards, and of course the day Game of Throne airs. All the essential options including tweeting and retweeting for Twitter, and liking and replying for Facebook are included. Blocked posts are replaced with a shield, and in case you can’t hold your curiosity, you can double tap to reveal the hidden content.


Spoiler Shield promises that a Google Chrome extension is also in the works. However, there’s another similar solution called Silencer that desktop users can use in the meanwhile. Silencer is a Google Chrome extension, which promises to filter spoilers from your social media feed. Like Spoiler Shield, it also comes with pre-configured block lists. Here, they are called Mute Packs. Once again, both TV shows and live events (AFC and NFC matches) are supported. The number of filter packs in Silencer is fewer than Spoiler Shield, but you can manually add terms that you wish to block.


No automated filtering technology is going to be perfect. However, these two free utilities should make it easier to avoid accidentally spoiling yourself. Take them for a spin, and don’t forget to let us know how well they worked for you.

Cleanup Your Facebook and Other Network Profiles with MyPermissions Cleaner

While Facebook’s one-click login button makes it really easy for users to signup for new apps and services, it also makes it ludicrously easy for malicious entities to get their hands on your private info. All they need to do is to create a quiz to lure you into sharing your Facebook profile data.

In a previous article we reviewed Privacyfix, which automatically identifies and highlights security issues in your Facebook and Google settings. One of the threats that Privacyfix identifies is app permissions. However, it doesn’t provide a quick way to withdraw access you have previously granted to various apps. Chances are that over the years you have allowed hundreds of apps to access your Facebook profile. Manually delisting them is likely to take quite a while. Thankfully, there is another browser extension, which can take care of this problem.


MyPermissions Cleaner is a handy extension for Chrome, Opera, and Firefox, which scans your Facebook profile and lists all apps that have access to your Facebook information, and allows you to revoke access to all apps with a single click. Ideally, you will not want to revoke access to all apps. For example, if you are an avid Instagram and Tweekdeck user, it makes sense to let these apps be. Thankfully, MyPermissions allows you to add select apps and services to a whitelist (Trusted Apps) with just a couple of clicks. Once you have whitelisted the apps you need, you can get rid of the rest of them with a single click. However, if you have several hundred apps in your list, then it might be easier to simply revoke permissions for everything and add back the apps that you use as and when required. MyPermissions Cleaner does a good job at exposing exactly what sort of info each app has access to, and allows you to filter apps by their access levels. The only trouble is that the extension doesn’t always work perfectly, and sometimes gets stuck while deleting an app. However, a page refresh generally takes care of the issue.


It’s not just Facebook alone, MyPermissions Cleaner currently also supports Twitter, Google, LinkedIn, Yahoo, Dropbox, Foursquare, Instagram, Flickr, AOL, and Windows Live. For each of these services the app works in an identical manner, and offers to cleanup your app permissions. If you have never bothered to look into the apps that have access to you profiles on various networks, go ahead and do it now. Let this be your little end of the year cleaning.

[ Download MyPermissions Cleaner ]

View Craigslist House Listings on Google Maps with CLMapper

If you live(d) in the U.S. you might have used or heard about Craigslist at some point of time. Craigslist is an online classified website which lets you sell or buy almost anything. It is a service which has been useful in finding used furniture, house for rent and more.

However, Craigslist is very simple as is and does not provide users with an intuitive interface that we are used to in several other services on the Internet, specially when it comes to apartment hunting. Previously, one of my favorite service, which I have used several times to find housing; PadMapper, used to provide a interface to map Craigslist house listings on a map. Unfortunately, Craigslist sent them a cease and desist to stop using data from the website.

While that in itself led several users to revolt at Craigslist, the revolt led to nothing and Padmapper will no longer show Craigslist listing on their site. Nevertheless, Craigslist is still useful for finding apartments and if you are a Padmapper user or are looking to view Craigslist listing on a map, you can use a simple Chrome listing which does something similar.

A Google Chrome Extension called CLMapper will allow you to view Craigslist posts on Google maps while you are browsing house listings Craigslist.

CLMapper Craigslist Apartment Mapper

Once you install the extension, you will be able to view all the apartments on an adjoining map as seen in the screenshot above. Clicking on the map will take you to the original Craigslist listing. This is definitely a useful PadMapper alternative because it allows you to only view apartments in a particular area and not browse through everything.

One thing I noticed that this extension does not work in all cities right now. For example, it does not work for New York. However, it does work for other cities/states like New Jersey and Phoenix.

Download CLMapper

Chrome Starts Blocking Extensions, Apps and Greasemonkey Scripts Outside Chrome Store

When Google launched the Store, it was one a good step ahead to provide users with Extensions and apps from a centralized location. However, Chrome still allowed users to install extensions and user scripts from any website making it a little insecure.

Chrome Blocking Extensions

However, it looks like Google is now beefing up on security and disallowing users from installing extensions, apps and user scripts from outside the . Users will now be prompted with a message saying “Extensions, apps and user scripts can only be added from the Chrome Web Store” when they try to install something which is not part of the Chrome Web Store.

While this is a good thing, it means that and Stylish scripts will stop working out of the box now unless a users changes Chrome’s settings or till they are included as a part of the Chrome Web Store.

So will users be able to still install extensions and scripts that are not part of Chrome Web Store? Well, the answer is Yes. Earlier this month, Martin from GHacks had posted about this problem and the potential fix. The fix is listed in a Chrome bug report which says:

You are no longer supposed to be able to install extensions off-store in Chrome. See  bug 55584  for details.

In order to install off-store extensions, the user must download them to a directory and drag them onto chrome://extensions/.

I intend to polish this UI a bit to hide the download bar so that people don’t click on it. I’d also like to add some UI that tells users that extension install is disabled off store or something, but we still haven’t figured out what that will look like.`

The bug referred in the above fix was a feature request which will allow enterprise users to disable users from installing extensions outside the Chrome Store while providing them with an option to whitelist other sources through an admin interface.

So dragging and dropping those extensions and user scripts to the extension page should currently allow you to install those extensions. You can also completely disable this feature by loading Chrome with the “–enable-easy-off-store-extension-install” flag. However, this is not recommended.

*Please note that the blocking currently does not happen in stable builds of Google Chrome.

Avoid Being Misinformed with Rbutr

RbutrWhile most savvy internet users typically treat anything they read online with a healthy degree of skepticism, innumerable people are still fooled every day. This might be by something as dangerous but obvious as a Nigerian 419 scam, or something as innocuous as an email forward claiming that entering ATM pin code in reverse will summon the police. While there are phishing and fraud protection tools that strive to protect you from the first kind of disinformation, there isn’t really anything to help you out with the second kind. Now, a new app is trying to fight back against false information on the internet.

Rbutr is a browser extension that is trying to tackle the serious challenge of online disinformation. It hopes to employ crowd-sourcing to build up a knowledgebase of rebuttals to various pieces of content on the web. You will need to register to be able to use the service. This is a stumbling block, which might put off many users. However, once you get past this step, it’s pretty simple to use Rbutr. Install the Chrome extension and continue browsing as you normally would. If Rbutr finds any rebuttals for the content you are currently viewing, its icon will change to alert you. The drawback here is that the icon change isn’t really prominent enough to draw attention. Rbutr needs to figure out how to better draw the user’s attention without really annoying him. If you want to give back to the community, you can submit rebuttals directly through the extension in a couple of simple steps.

At the moment the utility of Rbutr is limited as its database is pretty small. However, this is something that definitely has a lot of promise. If it ever gains critical mass, it is something that everyone should go ahead and install. However, right now, I would only recommend it to early adopters and enthusiasts.

Rbutr is currently only available for Chrome, but support for others browsers is in the works.

[ Download Rbutr ]

Yahoo Includes Certificate Private Key Inside Chrome Extension for Axis

Earlier today, Yahoo released their new browser extension for and and browser for and after news leaked about it. However, it looks like that they did it in a hurry and made a huge blunder while releasing their .

Yahoo Axis Certificate Private Key

As spotted by @nikcub,  Yahoo has included their private key with the Chrome extension. This private certificate will allow other users to sign their applications as Yahoo. I was able to confirm that the file was available inside the extension.

Nik further demonstrates the vulnerability of the leaked mistakenly included private certificate key in a detailed blog post which you can read here. While the extension would not be a problem currently , it would allow other scammers or phishers to pass off rogue extensions as those created by Yahoo or just re-upload the original extension with something rogue.

As a user, you should remove the current extension till Yahoo fixes this problem. To get rid of this problem, Yahoo would need to create a new certificate and sign their extension again and Google would probably have to negate the old certificate while installing extensions.

This is not the first time that such a blunder has happened when news has leaked hours before a release, but this is definitely a very big problem on Yahoo’s part.

Block Unblocked Websites in FlashBlock Extension for Chrome

I don’t hate Flash like Steve Jobs, but it does slow the browsing experience at times and can get annoying. There are several extensions and tools which allow you to block Flash in browsers like and , but most of the times Flash blocking extensions are heavy on memory usage and can slow down the browser. This is why I  prefer to use a lightweight and versatile called FlashBlock for Google Chrome, which does the job very well without using lot of memory.

Disable Flashblock

One of the problems I have faced with this extension though is the lack of support for whitelisting/blacklisting websites. However, FlashBlock does provide users with an option to do so through a right click option as seen above. The problem is that though it is easy to unblock websites from FlashBlock, there is no easy way to block them again if you want to change your decision.

However, I did find a way to block unblocked sites in FlashBlock extension by using a simple trick. If you are someone who wants to do it, follow the steps given below.

To block a unblocked website in FlashBlock, open the website in question in Google Chrome and then click on the wrench icon and then select “Developer tools” from under the Tools menu. Alternatively, you can also use the shortcut key “Ctrl + Shift + I

Doing the above steps will load the Chrome Developer interface. Now click on the “Resources” tab in the interface and expand the “Local Storage” dropdown. Now look for the exact URL of the website under the Local Storage menu and click on it. This will display the “Key-Value” pair of information stored for the website.

Block Flash Again in FlashBlock

To block the website through FlashBlock again, look for the key “ujs_flashblock” and right click on it and select the “Delete” option from the menu. Once you have deleted the key, reload the website again and Flash will be blocked on it.

Though there are several other Flash blocking extensions which provide with an easier interface to manage whitelists and blacklists, the extension in question is one of the best out there and does not hog resources. Blocking a website again is a little hard, but it is a great tradeoff for performance it provides.

Save Gmail Attachments to Google Drive

Google introduced the much awaited yesterday giving users 5GB of free cloud storage. However, with that introduction it looks like has removed the option to save Gmail attachments in and only provides options to view the document and download it. This is definitely a pain since I could easily save documents to Google Docs without problems in the past.

Save Gmail Attachments to Google Drive

If you are like me and want that feature back, you can do that with a  . The "Gmail Attachments to Drive" extension allows you to quickly save Gmail attachments straight to Google Drive by clicking a link. This saves you a lot of trouble because you no longer have to open the file before saving it to Google Docs. Secondly, this extension allows you to store any type of files in Google Drive.

Also Read: Google Docs vs Dropbox vs SkyDrive

Once you install the you will see an additional link to save the file to Google Drive. Clicking on the link should open a new window and save the file to your Google Drive account. Currently the files are stored in the main folder of Google Drive. You can easily move it to custom folders by visiting your Google Drive account.

If you are a user, you can also save Gmail Attachments directly to your Dropbox account as well.

This Chrome Extension Takes Out Gmail Chat From The Browser

I am not a big fan of IM programs and hence do not use desktop chat clients e.g Google Talk, Pidgin, Digsby or Meebo. The built in chat feature of Gmail is perfectly suitable for brief conversations but there is a small catch. During a chat conversation, you have to either stick to the Gmail tab forever or constantly oscillate between multiple tabs, which can be highly annoying at times. I am composing a blog post and here comes my friend whom I can’t ignore, I switch to the Gmail tab, send a message, fall back to the earlier tab and in comes the ding!

This cycle goes on and I have to find the Gmail tab within a sea of open browser tabs; there seems to be no possible way to get out of this situation other than sticking to the Gmail tab through the entire conversation.

If you are anything like me and want to detach Gmail chat from the browser, try this chat for Google chrome extension. This extension frees Gmail chat from Google Chrome, allowing you to reply to messages from no matter what web page you’re on at any given moment. The extension works exactly the same as the desktop Gmail client, with added support for email, video calling and Google Plus hangouts.

Once you have installed the extension, sign in to your Gmail account and you are through. Here is how the chat UI of the extension looks like:


To start a voice call or a Google Plus hangout, all you have to do is hit the respective icons on the chat window. One of the biggest advantage is the ability to send quick emails to your Gmail contacts, right from the desktop, without having to open Gmail at all. Type the name of the contact in the search pane, hit the result, compose your email and shoot! No more inbox gazing every 30 minutes.


The extension is slightly slow and IM’s might take a little longer to go through. Another downside is that it doesn’t support multiple user profiles or multiple Gmail accounts, so if you are using a shared computer, you better use the standalone desktop chat client. [via]

Also read: Ultimate list of tips and tricks for Google Chrome

Schedule Email in Gmail With Right Inbox

A few months back I had written about an interesting web app which allowed users to schedule emails in Gmail. The add-on for browsers like and worked very well and did its job. However, there is another entrant called "Right Inbox" which provides a similar service but is simpler to use.

Also Read: How To Send Anonymous Email | Temporary Disposable Email Services

While Boomerang for provides much more than just scheduling emails in Gmail, Right Inbox’s only focus lies on scheduling emails in Gmail. Once you install the Right Inbox extension refresh you Gmail page and you will be guided through grant permissions to the app to your Gmail Inbox.

Send Emails Later Gmail

Once you have granted permissions to the Right Inbox app, you will be able to schedule emails in Gmail with the click of a button. Right Inbox will add an additional button to the compose email workflow (as seen above) allowing you to send the email at a later time.

Schedule Emails in Gmail

Clicking on the "Send Later" button will give you several options to schedule the email. You can either click on the options provided or choose to send the email at a specific time. Once you have scheduled your email, the email will be stored in your drafts folder and will be delivered at the time you chose. The best part is that you don’t have to be near your computer once you have scheduled your email and Right Inbox will do the work for you.

Right Inbox is currently available as a and and can be downloaded from here.