Adobe says No Flash for iPhone

We posted the statement given by Steve Jobs regarding Flash and why he hates it. As we expected Adobe did reply to that comment made by Steve Jobs. Adobe is now shifting away from Apple devices for Flash Player and AIR.

Here is the quote posted by Adobe.

This morning Apple posted some thoughts about Flash on their web site. The primary issue at hand is that Apple is choosing to block Adobe’s widely used runtimes as well as a variety of technologies from other
providers.

Clearly, a lot of people are passionate about both Apple and Adobe and our technologies. We feel confident that were Apple and Adobe to work together as we are with a number of other partners, we could provide a terrific experience with Flash on the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

However, as we posted last week, given the legal terms Apple has imposed on developers, we have already decided to shift our focus away from Apple’s iPhone and iPad devices for both Flash Player and AIR. We are working to bring Flash Player and AIR to all the other major participants in the mobile ecosystem, including Google, RIM, Palm (soon to be HP), Microsoft, Nokia and others.

We look forward to delivering Flash Player 10.1 for Android smartphones as a public preview at Google I/O in May, and then a general release in June. From that point on, an ever increasing number and variety of powerful, Flash-enabled devices will be arriving which we hope will provide a great landscape of choice.

The Journal’s Alan Murray had an exclusive interview with Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen. Here is the video.

(Quote Source)

(Video Source)

6 Reasons Why Steve Jobs Hate Flash

Apple on their official website gave 6 reasons why they don’t allow Adobe Flash on iPhone, iPad and iPod. Apple said that both the companies had worked together in the past but now the distance has increased between the two.

Flash and apple

Here is the entire quote given by Steve Jobs regarding Flash.

First, there’s Open.

Adobe’s Flash products are 100% proprietary. They are only available from Adobe, and Adobe has sole authority as to their future enhancement, pricing, etc. While Adobe’s Flash products are widely available, this does not mean they are open, since they are controlled entirely by Adobe and available only from Adobe. By almost any definition, Flash is a closed system.

Apple has many proprietary products too. Though the operating system for the iPhone, iPod and iPad is proprietary, we strongly believe that all standards pertaining to the web should be open. Rather than use Flash, Apple has adopted HTML5, CSS and JavaScript all open standards. Apple’s mobile devices all ship with high performance, low power implementations of these open standards. HTML5, the new web standard that has been adopted by Apple, Google and many others, lets web developers create advanced graphics, typography, animations and transitions without relying on third party browser plug-ins (like Flash). HTML5 is completely open and controlled by a standards committee, of which Apple is a member.

Apple even creates open standards for the web. For example, Apple began with a small open source project and created WebKit, a complete open-source HTML5 rendering engine that is the heart of the Safari web browser used in all our products. WebKit has been widely adopted. Google uses it for Android’s browser, Palm uses it, Nokia uses it, and RIM (Blackberry) has announced they will use it too. Almost every smartphone web browser other than Microsoft’s uses WebKit. By making its WebKit technology open, Apple has set the standard for mobile web browsers.

Second, there’s the full web.

Adobe has repeatedly said that Apple mobile devices cannot access the full webbecause 75% of video on the web is in Flash. What they don’t say is that almost all this video is also available in a more modern format, H.264, and viewable on iPhones, iPods and iPads. YouTube, with an estimated 40% of the web’s video, shines in an app bundled on all Apple mobile devices, with the iPad offering perhaps the best YouTube discovery and viewing experience ever. Add to this video from Vimeo, Netflix, Facebook, ABC, CBS, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, ESPN, NPR, Time, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Sports Illustrated, People, National Geographic, and many, many others. iPhone, iPod and iPad users aren’t missing much video.

Another Adobe claim is that Apple devices cannot play Flash games. This is true. Fortunately, there are over 50,000 games and entertainment titles on the App Store, and many of them are free. There are more games and entertainment titles available for iPhone, iPod and iPad than for any other platform in the world.

Third, there’s reliability, security and performance.

Symantec recently highlighted Flash for having one of the worst security records in 2009. We also know first hand that Flash is the number one reason Macs crash. We have been working with Adobe to fix these problems, but they have persisted for several years now. We don’t want to reduce the reliability and security of our iPhones, iPods and iPads by adding Flash.

In addition, Flash has not performed well on mobile devices. We have routinely asked Adobe to show us Flash performing well on a mobile device, any mobile device, for a few years now. We have never seen it. Adobe publicly said that Flash would ship on a smartphone in early 2009, then the second half of 2009, then the first half of 2010, and now they say the second half of 2010. We think it will eventually ship, but we’re glad we didn’t hold our breath. Who knows how it will perform?

Fourth, there’s battery life.

To achieve long battery life when playing video, mobile devices must decode the video in hardware; decoding it in software uses too much power. Many of the chips used in modern mobile devices contain a decoder called H.264 an industry standard that is used in every Blu-ray DVD player and has been adopted by Apple, Google (YouTube), Vimeo, Netflix and many other companies.

Although Flash has recently added support for H.264, the video on almost all Flash websites currently requires an older generation decoder that is not implemented in mobile chips and must be run in software. The difference is striking: on an iPhone, for example, H.264 videos play for up to 10 hours, while videos decoded in software play for less than 5 hours before the battery is fully drained.

When websites re-encode their videos using H.264, they can offer them without using Flash at all. They play perfectly in browsers like Apple’s Safari and Google’s Chrome without any plugins whatsoever, and look great on iPhones, iPods and iPads.

Fifth, there’s Touch.

Flash was designed for PCs using mice, not for touch screens using fingers. For example, many Flash websites rely on rollovers, which pop up menus or other elements when the mouse arrow hovers over a specific spot. Apple’s revolutionary multi-touch interface doesn’t use a mouse, and there is no concept of a rollover. Most Flash websites will need to be rewritten to support touch-based devices. If developers need to rewrite their Flash websites, why not use modern technologies like HTML5, CSS and JavaScript?

Even if iPhones, iPods and iPads ran Flash, it would not solve the problem that most Flash websites need to be rewritten to support touch-based devices.

Sixth, the most important reason.

Besides the fact that Flash is closed and proprietary, has major technical drawbacks, and doesn’t support touch based devices, there is an even more important reason we do not allow Flash on iPhones, iPods and iPads. We have discussed the downsides of using Flash to play video and interactive content from websites, but Adobe also wants developers to adopt Flash to create apps that run on our mobile devices.

We know from painful experience that letting a third party layer of software come between the platform and the developer ultimately results in sub-standard apps and hinders the enhancement and progress of the platform. If developers grow dependent on third party development libraries and tools, they can only take advantage of platform enhancements if and when the third party chooses to adopt the new features. We cannot be at the mercy of a third party deciding if and when they will make our enhancements available to our developers.

This becomes even worse if the third party is supplying a cross platform development tool. The third party may not adopt enhancements from one platform unless they are available on all of their supported platforms. Hence developers only have access to the lowest common denominator set of features. Again, we cannot accept an outcome where developers are blocked from using our innovations and enhancements because they are not available on our competitor’s platforms.

Flash is a cross platform development tool. It is not Adobe’s goal to help developers write the best iPhone, iPod and iPad apps. It is their goal to help developers write cross platform apps. And Adobe has been painfully slow to adopt enhancements to Apple’s platforms. For example, although Mac OS X has been shipping for almost 10 years now, Adobe just adopted it fully (Cocoa) two weeks ago when they shipped CS5. Adobe was the last major third party developer to fully adopt Mac OS X.

Our motivation is simple we want to provide the most advanced and innovative platform to our developers, and we want them to stand directly on the shoulders of this platform and create the best apps the world has ever seen. We want to continually enhance the platform so developers can create even more amazing, powerful, fun and useful applications. Everyone wins we sell more devices because we have the best apps, developers reach a wider and wider audience and customer base, and users are continually delighted by the best and broadest selection of apps on any platform.

Conclusions.

Flash was created during the PC era for PCs and mice. Flash is a successful business for Adobe, and we can understand why they want to push it beyond PCs. But the mobile era is about low power devices, touch interfaces and open web standards all areas where Flash falls short.

The avalanche of media outlets offering their content for Apple’s mobile devices demonstrates that Flash is no longer necessary to watch video or consume any kind of web content. And the 200,000 apps on Apple’s App Store proves that Flash isn’t necessary for tens of thousands of developers to create graphically rich applications, including games.

New open standards created in the mobile era, such as HTML5, will win on mobile devices (and PCs too). Perhaps Adobe should focus more on creating great HTML5 tools for the future, and less on criticizing Apple for leaving the past behind.

Steve Jobs
April, 2010

(Source)

Google’s Andy Rubin Promises Full Flash Support on Android 2.2

Android 2.2 (Froyo) is looking to get not one but many new key features. Few days ago, we reported that automatic updates for application will be possible on Android 2.2. Now, Andy Rubin, vice president for engineering at Google, who also leads the team behind therubin-android development of Android, promised Full Flash support on Android 2.2. This is the first official confirmation for the Full Flash support on Android 2.2.

He also said that, he believes Android phone sales will overtake Apple’s and R.I.M.’s sales.

It’s a numbers game. When you have multiple O.E.M.’s building multiple products in multiple product categories, it’s just a matter of time before sales of Android phones exceed the sales of   proprietary systems like Apple’s and R.I.M.’s, he said.

When he was asked when will Android overtake, he said,

I don’t know when it might be, but I’m confident it will happen. Open usually wins.

(Source)

Adobe Flash Player and Google Chrome; Just Married

Adobe Flash and Google Chrome got close when Adobe announced the availability of Flash support on Google Chrome. Adobe Flash player will be available on future versions of Google Chrome by default and they will no longer require to download am extra third-party plugin for this.

Further, any update to the Flash player will be delivered as Chrome’s browser update eliminating all security issues.

This adds more security to the already secure Chrome browser. The latest update keeps out any hack attempts and does not annoy users for updates. The flash player can also be disabled easily.

In addition to this, Adobe is also working on a new browser API, which is built on top of the NPAPI of Firefox. The now API will help plugins to integrate more tightly with the host browser. This will also improve sandboxing and provide added security.

The Chromium blog has said,

Improving the traditional browser plug-in model will make it possible for plug-ins to be just as fast, stable, and secure as the browser’s HTML and JavaScript engines.

It is good to see Internet movers and shakers like Google, Adobe and Firefox work together towards a better web.
(Via: Neowin.net)

Plants Vs. Zombies for Linux

Have you heard of the famous Plants Vs. Zombies game? If not, it is an awesome game which takes you through varied levels of adventures to protect your home from Zombies who are trying to “eat your brains”. The primary defense mechanism for your home is implemented through plants who protect the house with their powers.

The zombies get more evolved with each stage and the plants get more powerful against the zombies. There are a good number of constrains like number of plants you can use and the time interval between which you can plant the same twice. This is again determined by a factor of items collected. These items are called suns in the game and you are supposed to maintain a number of suns to be able to plant each plant. In short, it is a resource management game like one of those strategy games. You have to maintain defences and protect your home. The levels are intriguing and the game-play is sheer fun. The game is suitable for all age groups and three of us authors at Techie-Buzz here love the game already.

The good news though, is that the game was available only for Windows all this long but now, you can play the game on Linux too. Simply head over to this official site to download the game. You can also play it online if you wish. Playing from the desktop has advantages like full screen support. The game is provided as a Flash game and requires no Internet connection to save scores and stages. Enjoy.
Download link goes here.

Windows Mobile 7 will not have Adobe Flash

Seems like Windows Mobile 7 won’t be having flash support for quite some time now. Adobe has issued a brief statement in this regard:

Microsoft and Adobe are working closely together. While the newest version of Windows Phone won’t support Flash at initial availability, both companies are working to include a browser plug-in for the full Flash player in future versions of Windows Phone. More details will be shared at Microsoft MIX next month.

Though this statement seems positive, bear in mind that Adobe has promised us flash support for Android but we won’t be seeing it for atleast 3 months. This might place Windows Mobile 7’s time someplace in second half of this year.

YouTube and Vimeo Support HTML5 Videos, Goodbye Flash

For the past several years, video sites like and Vimeo have changed how we watch videos online, and Flash has played a very big role in it. However, in my personal experience, Flash has been one of the biggest pain in the browsers, and watching videos has not been that rosy, not just for me but for several others too.

HTML5 Videos

With the official introduction of HTML5 looming around the corner, several websites and browsers have started to implement the new features available in it. One of the most exciting feature in HTML5 is that it has support for streaming videos through the <video> tag, without having to use any other additional resources or software such as Flash.

Both YouTube and Vimeo have officially started supporting HTML5 videos, which is pretty exciting and will definitely shape the future on how we watch videos online. The most exciting features in HTML5 videos is that you can watch it in fullscreen, just like you would do it on a desktop player, and no more buffering, simply jump to any part of the video you want, again this experience is similar to desktop players.

To watch HTML5 supported videos on your browser visit http://www.youtube.com/html5 or go to Vimeo and click on the "Switch to HTML5 Player" link at the bottom of the video page. Please note that you browser has to be HTML5 compatible in order to view the videos. Right now YouTube and Vimeo only support Webkit based browsers, including Safari and , with support for IE with the Chrome Frame add-in installed.

Flash On A iPhone/iPod Touch Through JavaScript

The one thing I miss on my iPod Touch is the ability to watch videos in the app. However, that is not a problem with the Facebook app. It is a very well know fact that users cannot run Flash applications or websites on the and iPod Touch.

flash_on_iphone

To overcome this issue, some developers have come up with a workaround which will allow users to run Flash on a iPhone on the Safari web browser. According to TUAW, the project is a open source project named the Gordon Project, and is hosted on github.

The Gordon project is a JavaScript powered Flash runtime using which users can load SWF files on iPhone’s mobile Safari browser. You can try out some demos by loading http://wiki.github.com/tobeytailor/gordon/demos on your iPhone/iTouch browser.

In my experience the flash files loaded fine, however it was pretty slow. It can be expected though, since this is a very preliminary build. You can expect it to improve and show better performance in future builds. Developing flash based websites using the Gordon Project is not very easy though, you can find instructions on how to use this JS framework here.

Rest aside, this is pretty exciting as there are not plans from Apple to actually include Flash support on the iPhone and iPod Touch, the Gordon project at-least gives developers an alternative to work with.