Tag Archives: Firefox

Put Firefox into Hyperdrive with Pale Moon

palemoon-ico [Windows Only] What is Pale Moon? It’s an open source project that takes the Firefox web browser code and recompiles it to run faster in Windows.

Here’s what the author says about it:

Why settle for a basic build of your Firefox browser on Windows Operating Systems when you can have one that performs 25% faster? Mozilla does not provide optimized browser packages for Windows, while many Linux users get the advantage of a browser built specifically for their system. That needs to change! So, here is the Pale Moon project: Custom-built and optimized Firefox browsers for Windows Operating Systems.

pale-moon-browser

I have been using Pale Moon for a few days now, and I did notice a performance boost in comparison with my usual Firefox installs. I would have to say that Pale Moon is a winner.

There are no drastic differences other than the name. All of your old addons should continue to work. You’ll just get around the web a little faster. The author of Pale Moon claims that only real differences are that it doesn’t support the accessibility features or parental controls. Since I don’t use either one, I don’t know what I’m missing.

There’s even a Pale Moon persona (theme) available on the home page that makes it look very cool.

Download and try Pale Moon

Techie Buzz Verdict:

The only major drawback to using Pale Moon is that it may sometimes be a release or two behind Mozilla Firefox. Other than that, there’s not much difference from what I can tell. I can’t think of a good reason why I shouldn’t recommend it for every Firefox user running Windows.

techiebuzzrecommendedsoftware1

Techie Buzz Rating: 4.5/5 (Excellent)

Wiimote Controlled Firefox

This recent entry at Mozilla links shows a Wiimote controlled Firefox. Paul Rouget has written a neat hack which allows us to use the Wiimote with Firefox. Over at his website, Paul writes,

Everybody has his or her own reason to hack Firefox. Mine is usually:  “just for fun”.

So,  “just for fun”, and to show how far you can go with the extension mechanism, here is a little useless extension I wrote: a  Nintendo Wiimote driver for Firefox.
What does it do? It brings Wiimote events to web content. You can change tabs with a “forehand/backhand” tennis drive and, in your web page, make your elements move using Wiimote events (rotation, g-force, position, etc.). Web pages, of course, do not support this API. But, with another extension, such as aJetpack or  Greasemonkey, you can “hack” a website to add support for the Wiimote.

although the extension is open-source, it works only for Linux currently. Check out this video:

Wiimote for Firefox from Paul Rouget on Vimeo.

FOSS Friday: Ubuntu 10.04 Beta2 Released, Songbird Drops Linux Support And More

This week we saw lots of interesting activities in FOSS. Here is our weekly roundup of the key FOSS events this week.

News

  • Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx Beta 2 Released

The second beta of Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx was released yesterday. Although it has some small changes, it does not have any striking difference from the earlier Beta 1. If you are using Ubuntu 10.04 Beta 1 with regular updates, there is no need to install the Beta 2 for you. You can read more here.

  • Songbird Decides to Drop Linux Support

The Pioneers of the Inevitable announced that the  Mozilla XULRunner based music player, Songbird, will no longer be supported in Linux. This decision has been blamed on the lack of developers and their inability to continue maintaining Songbird in Linux at the same level as that in Windows and Mac OS X. An active Songbird developer has already forked the Songbird project and named it Nightingale. You can read more about it here.

  • Firefox in Ubuntu 10.04 is Going To Use Google Search

Canonicals retracted their earlier decision to use Yahoo! as the default search in Firefox that comes with Ubuntu 10.04. Firefox in Ubuntu 10.04 will now use Google as the default search. You can read more here.

Tips & Features

  • Install The Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Bisigi Themes In Karmic

There are a lot of people still using Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic and they might want to use the updated Bisigi themes but that’s not easy – the new PPA is only for Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid and also Karmic doesn’t have the latest Murrine engine so the themes won’t work – but there is a way to do it. Read more about it at  WebUpd8.

  • Installation and Getting Started with Firebug

Firebug is a free, open source tool that is available as a Mozilla Firefox extension, and allows debugging, editing, and monitoring of any website’s CSS, HTML, DOM, and JavaScript. Read more at PACKT.

Firefox in Ubuntu Coming Back to Google Search

We had earlier reports of Ubuntu 10.04 using Yahoo search as the default option on its Ubuntu Linux. One of the two major changes announced by Rick Spencer was,

The default search homepage will change to the Yahoo! search homepage if we change the default search engine preference to Yahoo!. If we do not change the default search preference to Yahoo!, the current Google search page will remain intact as the homepage. This change currently applies to Yahoo! and Google only.

However, now Ubuntu is surprisingly switching back to Google search as the default. This time as well, we have Canonical’s desktop engineering manager,  Rick Spencer detailing this change saying,

Earlier in the 10.04 cycle I announced that we
would be changing the default search provider to Yahoo!, and we
implemented that change for several milestones.

However, for the final release, we will use Google as the default
provider. I have asked the Ubuntu Desktop team to change the default
back to Google as soon as reasonably possible, but certainly by final
freeze on April 15th.

That would not be a surprise as earlier, Rick Spencer said Ubuntu was entering a revenue sharing deal with Yahoo!. Now, we all know here that a similar deal with Google gives much better financial returns. Or as d0od at Omg!Ubuntu says,

it could be that they found most users where switching the search back to Google anyways.

Download Firefox For Android Pre-Release

We have recently seen a lot of movement in the Firefox world. The mobile version of Firefox was dropped from plan as Windows left no stone unturned to make its own browser, the last man standing on the Windows Mobile 7. Next, Pwn2Own brought out some unresolved vulnerabilities in Firefox.

Following the buzz, today, Firefox is available as a pre-release download from the Android Forum. Although this build is not feature complete, it has the basic bookmarks and some add-on support. The Firefox available is for the Droid and does not run on all handsets equally well. The application is availabe as GeckoApp.

If you want to check out the looks and feel without actually installing the latest Firefox, see this Youtube video for a demo.

(Via: DownloadSquad)

Adobe Flash Player and Google Chrome; Just Married

Adobe Flash and Google Chrome got close when Adobe announced the availability of Flash support on Google Chrome. Adobe Flash player will be available on future versions of Google Chrome by default and they will no longer require to download am extra third-party plugin for this.

Further, any update to the Flash player will be delivered as Chrome’s browser update eliminating all security issues.

This adds more security to the already secure Chrome browser. The latest update keeps out any hack attempts and does not annoy users for updates. The flash player can also be disabled easily.

In addition to this, Adobe is also working on a new browser API, which is built on top of the NPAPI of Firefox. The now API will help plugins to integrate more tightly with the host browser. This will also improve sandboxing and provide added security.

The Chromium blog has said,

Improving the traditional browser plug-in model will make it possible for plug-ins to be just as fast, stable, and secure as the browser’s HTML and JavaScript engines.

It is good to see Internet movers and shakers like Google, Adobe and Firefox work together towards a better web.
(Via: Neowin.net)

Browser Saturday: Internet Explorer, Firefox and Safari Get Pwned, Opera Puts the Ball in Apple’s Court

The big event this week on the browser security forefront is the Pwn2Own content, which challenges hackers to break through the defenses of top browsers and operating systems. As expected by most security experts, Internet Explorer, Firefox and Safari fell quite quickly. Chrome is the only browser still standing (sadly Opera was not included in the challenge). You can find more information about the exploits used by the winning participants over here.

Pwn2Own wasn’t the only thing happening in the browser-sphere. Here is a quick look at other major events from this week.

Internet Explorer

It’s been almost a month since the browser ballot screen went live. While it has definitely had a positive impact on the download rate of alternate browsers, there is still confusion regarding its effect on Internet Explorer’s dominance. According to Statcounter, Internet Explorer has managed to hold on to its market share. This suggests that a lot of users are in fact returning to Internet Explorer after checking out the alternatives. However, now QuantCast is reporting that Internet Explorer’s shares may have dipped by as much as 5% over the course of 3 weeks

Awhile, Microsoft is yet to patch the previously discussed critical vulnerability in Internet Explorer 6.0x and 7.0x. If you are still on older versions of IE, ensure that you have applied the suggested workarounds.

Firefox

Fennec-Firefox-Windows-Phone-Mobile This was an interesting week for Firefox. Following the German Government’s advisory, which warned surfers against using Firefox, Mozilla fast-tracked the release of Firefox 3.6.2 which fixed multiple security issues.

On the mobile space, Mozilla stopped development of Firefox (Fennec) for Windows Mobile and Windows Phone 7. This decision was prompted by Microsoft’s refusal to release a NDK for Windows Phone 7, which made developing native applications impossible.

Chrome

Chrome-5-Auto-Fill-Form

This was a jolly good week for Google Chrome. It proved itself to be the most secure browser in the Pwn2Own contest, and now Google has pushed through Chrome Beta 5 for Windows. Chrome 5 introduces a host of new features including Windows 7 Taskbar Tabs and an intelligent form filler. V8 (JavaScript engine) has been refined even further and according to our preliminary tests, the new build of Chrome edges out Opera 10.51 for the title of the fastest browser in the world.

Earlier this week, Google also unveiled its new ANGLE (Almost Native Graphics Layer Engine) project, which will enhance Chrome’s graphics rendering capabilities across platforms.

Opera

Opera Software finally submitted Opera Mini for iPhone to the app store for approval. Whether Apple will approve it or not is a million dollar question. However, Opera has certainly played its part well and has succeeded in getting everyone’s attention. If Apple does reject this app, it will undoubtedly have to endure another wave of negative publicity and possibly even more (we already know that the FCC has been watching ever since the Google Voice saga).

On the desktop front, Opera continued its aggressive release cycle. Opera 10.51 for Windows fixed a couple of highly critical security vulnerabilities along with a host of bug fixes and all-around performance improvement. UNIX and MAC users also had plenty of snapshot builds to keep them busy. Click here to get the latest snapshot build for Windows, UNIX and Mac.

That is all I have for this week. Subscribe to our Feed to get instant updates through the week.

Install Google Chrome Extensions in Firefox with Google Chrome Extensions Manager

Google Chrome’s add-on API is designed to be lightweight and secure. However, the trade-off is that it is not as powerful as Firefox’s add-on platform. As if just to demonstrate this, a Firefox developer has taken it upon himself to implement the Google Chrome API through a Firefox extension.

Google-Chrome-Extensions-Manager-for-Firefox

The Google chrome extensions manager for Firefox does just what its name suggests – it allows you to install and manage Google Chrome extensions in Firefox. The extension is currently a work in progress and only supports a limited subset of the Chrome API.

Techie Buzz Verdict

The concept is definitely interesting, but its practical utility is limited at this point of time. As of now, for almost every Chrome add-on there is a Firefox extension. On top of that, installing new Chrome add-ons isn’t absolutely straightforward. Also, none of the extensions I tried worked perfectly. Nevertheless, I will not be too harsh on it, since it is still in experimental stage.

Techie Buzz Verdict: 1.5/5 (Average)

[ Download Google chrome extensions manager ]

(via @fearphage)

Firefox 3.6.2 Released, Fixes Security Vulnerability

Mozilla has upped the ante to fix a severe security vulnerability in Firefox 3.6 which affects several users. The vulnerability in question, was reported by security researcher Evgeny Legerov last month.

Firefox did release a release candidate yesterday, but due to criticality of the bug they have released the final version today.

Mozilla has accelerated its timetable and released Firefox 3.6.2 ahead of schedule. This release contains a number of security fixes, including a fix to Secunia Advisory SA38608 which was previously discussed on this blog when we were first made aware of and were then able to confirm the issue.

If you are a Firefox 3.6 user, go to the help menu and click on "Check for Updates" to update to the current version, if you need any help check our earlier post on how to update Firefox.

Users can also update their Firefox to the latest version by visiting the Firefox Download site and downloading the latest version and installing it.

Mozilla Stops Firefox Development For Windows Mobile and Windows Phone 7

Mozilla has been building a version of Firefox for Windows Mobile devices for quite some time now with anticipation that Microsoft might increase it’s market share. The Windows Phone 7 announcement was watched quite keenly by the Mozilla team and that in turn is base on Window CE 6, which is a completely different platform from the earlier Windows Mobile OS.

Firefox Mobile

However, developing for Windows Phone 7 was not easy considering the restrictions placed on developers. In addition to that, Mozilla also cited that Windows Phone 7 has a closed platform and does not support development of native applications through a NDK. For that reason, Mozilla today announced that they are stopping development of Firefox for all Windows Mobile based devices including the upcoming Windows Phone 7.

While we think Windows Phone 7 looks interesting and has the potential to do well in the market, Microsoft has unfortunately decided to close off development to native applications.   Because of this, we won’t be able to provide Firefox for Windows Phone 7 at this time.   Given that Microsoft is staking their future in mobile on Windows Mobile 7 (not 6.5) and because we don’t know if or when Microsoft will release a native development kit, we are putting our Windows Mobile development on hold.

This is definitely bad news for Firefox lovers who have been waiting in anticipation for the Firefox browser on Windows Mobile based devices. Quite recently, a Mozilla developer had written a open letter rant directed at Steve Ballmer with regards to this issue. However, it now looks like the entire Mozilla mobile team has taken it to heart, and have decided that they will not develop for Windows Phone 7 until a proper development platform is provided.

Clarification: The post linked in this article was written up by Stuart Parmenter who is the Mobile Team Technical Lead, Mozilla Corporation. Thanks for the letting us know about the missing info Iftikhar.