Nokia 2050 Launched In China With Dedicated QQ Button

Some of the major mobile phone maker has already tried their luck by manufacturing a smartphone which focuses on the social networking sites, specially Facebook. Last year, HTC launched the mid-range HTC Chacha and HTC Salsa smartphones with a dedicated Facebook button. Even Vodafone launched the entry-level Vodafone 555 Blue with a Facebook button. Sadly, none of them managed to attract the Facebook addicts in developing countries.

Last month, Nokia joined the bandwagon and announced the company’s first QWERTY phone with a dedicated Facebook button, the Nokia Asha 205. It was already rumored that Nokia will replace the Facebook button with the QQ button before shipping it in China, since Facebook is already blocked up there and QQ is the most popular instant messaging service among Chinese users.

Today, Nokia finally confirmed the rumor and launched the Nokia 2050 in China. And you guessed it right! The Nokia 2050 comes with the exact same specs found in the Asha 205 minus the Facebook button and Asha branding. This device is specially targeted at the youngsters, who wants to stay connected with their friends and family on the go.

The Nokia 2050 comes with a 2.4 inch QVGA display, Series 40 Asha UI, full QWERTY keyboard, VGA camera, Nokia Xpress Browser, Nokia Life+, Bluetooth 2.1 with EDR, 3.5 mm headset jack, Slam feature, 10 MB internal memory, MicroSD card slot, 32 GB expandable memory, GPRS/EDGE, 2.0 mm charger connector, up to 25 days of stand-by time, up to 11 hours of talk-time and a 1020 mAh battery.

The Nokia 2050 comes with a price tag of 399 Chinese Yuan (approx. $65). You will also get an exclusive gift of 40 EA games which includes titles such as Tetris, Bejeweled, Need for Speed The Run and EA Sports FIFA 12.

Facebook Poke Sinks as Snapchat Gains in Popularity

Making it to the top isn’t easy, but staying there is even harder. And, Facebook is finding this out the hard way. Facebook Poke shot to the top of the free apps list in the iTunes App Store within a day of its release. Fast forward a week, and it has not only lost its #1 spot, but has vanished entirely from the top 10. In fact, Facebook Poke is currently languishing at #35.

Snapchat vs Facebook Poke

Facebook Poke’s rise and fall shows that even if you already have a billion users, things don’t necessarily become easier for you. Sure, the massive existing userbase allowed Facebook to climb rapidly to the top of the App Store charts. However, once users discovered that Facebook’s app offers little that isn’t already there in Snapchat, interest waned. In the meanwhile, Snapchat, the service that pioneered the concept of self-destructing messages, climbed to the #4 slot. The fear of having to use real names while sending risqué messages might have also played a role in Poke’s quick fall.

Blindly copying features from other apps hasn’t worked out well for Facebook in the past either. Questions, which was perhaps inspired by the popularity of Quora, was shuttered fairly quickly. The check-in feature has fared comparatively better, but hasn’t managed to come anywhere near dethroning Foursquare, as the original ambition was.

Mobile is Facebook’s biggest challenge, and it won’t be able to conquer the segment by simply copying and iterating. Facebook has some of the smartest engineers in the world. Perhaps its time that it went into another lock-down and brainstormed ideas that can lend Facebook the decisive edge.

Lock Down Your Facebook and Google Accounts with Privacyfix

Way back in 2010, just as the controversy surrounding Facebook’s Open Graph was exploding, we had reviewed a nifty bookmarklet called ReclaimPrivacy that could automatically scan your Facebook settings and highlight areas of concern. Recently I came across a Firefox and Chrome extension called PrivacyFix, which does the same thing, but better.

As soon as you install the extension, it will scan your currently-logged-in Facebook and Google accounts, as well as your browser cookies to identify privacy threats. Once it finishes scanning, you will see a neat report, which highlights potential areas of concern. Privacyfix explains each of the identified issues, and assists you in fixing them.


Privacy Fix also maintains a database of popular websites that track and retain user data. For websites with an opt-out policy it offers to send a mail requesting to opt-you out. Additionally, it can delete existing tracking cookies, and block tracking cookies from being placed in the future.


Privacyfix is a simple, hassle-free solution that goes a long way towards avoiding accidental privacy breaches on social networks. Both Facebook and Google offer great privacy tools. Unfortunately, they are either difficult to find, or too confusing for most users. By automatically identifying and highlighting potential issues, Privacyfix makes things easier for the user. It’s a tool that even your parents could use with confidence. Go ahead and download it. There is no reason not to.


[ Download Privacyfix ]

Reliance Offers Unlimited Facebook Messenger Access For Just Rs.16

We have a good news for Facebook addicts. Most of the operators in India have already launched the unlimited BBM (BlackBerry Messenger) plan, which allows the BlackBerry users to enjoy unlimited BBM access for just Rs.129 per month. Along similar lines, Reliance Communications recently launched the new Facebook Messenger plan.

You can subscribe to this plan for just Rs.16. It comes with a validity of 30 days. The new Facebook Messenger plan offers unlimited access to Facebook Messenger without subscribing to any other data plans. This plan will prove to be extremely useful for those who does not want to subscribe to any costly data plans, but still want to get in touch with their Facebook friends on the go.

Sadly, this pack is currently available only for pre-paid subscribers. The plan is auto-renewed every 30 days unless the user unsubscribe it manually. Facebook Messenger is currently available for iPhone, BlackBerry and Android. You can also use Facebook Messenger even if you do not have a Facebook account. Similar to WhatsApp, the new Facebook Messenger for Android allows you to sign up with just using your name and phone number. You can download the app from

Nilanjan Mukherjee, Wireless Chief Revenue Officer, Reliance Communications Limited said,
“We have always been at the forefront of offering innovative products with incredible affordability for our customers and the launch of Facebook Messenger Plan is yet another step in that direction. We are confident that ‘Facebook Messenger Plan’ with unlimited usage of Facebook without any extra data charges is set to provide a compelling new experience with incredible affordability to smartphone users across the country on our superior network. We are hoping this offer to trigger a significant shift of youth customers using smartphones to our superior network.”

Facebook Releases Snapchat Clone Called Facebook Poke

Facebook has released yet another app for the iOS platform, and this one was apparently created in just twelve days by Zuckerberg and a small team of coders. The new app is called Facebook Poke, and is essentially a Snapchat clone. The story is that Facebook attempted to buy Snapchat’s tiny team of five, but the team chose to stay independent. So, Facebook decided to simply build its own Snapchat like app.


Facebook Poke is a mobile messaging app which can be used for sending pokes, messages (120 char), photos and videos (up to 10 seconds). However, like in Snapchat, the message self-destructs seconds (1,3,5, or 10 seconds) after the recipient views it. It also has a screenshot alert that notifies the sender if you attempt to screenshot the message.


In less than a day after Poke was launched, it has climbed to the #1 spot among free apps in the App Store, with Snapchat staying at #9 position. Poke is tightly integrated with the Facebook graph, and the Facebook brand name alone is strong enough to drive millions of downloads. However, the are a couple of areas of concern with Poke that might hold users back from jumping ships. Snapchat allows users to use custom usernames. On the other hand, Facebook Poke displays your real name, which is pulled from your Facebook profile. The other concern is related with data retention. Snapchat promises to delete your messages as soon as possible after the message is transmitted. Facebook on the other hand holds onto the message for two days after they have been seen by the last recipient, and after that it deletes the encryption key making the message inaccessible for everyone. However, the encryption key might persist in backups for up to 90 days. This if of course better than the standard Facebook terms of service, which grants the company liberty to store your content for as long as you have an account. But, will it be good enough for an app, which is meant for sharing the intimate photos you don’t want to be committed to record?

[ Download Facebook Poke ]

Facebook Testing $1 Fee for Messages to Non-friends

The social networking giant Facebook has figured out yet another way to monetize the site. According to Facebook, it is testing a new service that will enable advertisers (or anyone) to send messages to Facebook users with whom they are not connect with, and guarantees that this message will be delivered right into the users’ inbox, rather than the rarely-visited folder “other.”

That sounds like “premium” spam messages to me.

Facebook launched the “other” folder back in 2011, which was basically used to store messages that were sent from a non-Facebook friend. In other words, the “other” folder acts pretty much like a spam folder. However, with the new service, users will be able to pay $1 to route their messages to the inbox.

Facebook states that this will benefit both the sender and the receiver:

“For example, if you want to send a message to someone you heard speak at an event but are not friends with, or if you want to message someone about a job opportunity, you can use this feature to reach their inbox.”

“For the receiver, this test allows them to hear from people who have an important message to send them.”

Also it worth noting that messages sent to [email protected] from your regular email services like Gmail will also end up in the “others” folder.

Facebook said the new $1 fee could help reduce spam or irrelevant messages from being sent to inboxes. They have said the option will only be presented to a “small number” of users in the U.S. at this point, and people will be limited to one paid message per week to start.

Facebook Bans Popular Extension F.B. Purity, Again!

FB-PurityWith the turf war between social media services heating up, these services are getting more and more hostile. Startups that were once proud of their open gardens have begun constructing walls to keep out competitors. Recently we saw Instagram pulling support for cards from Twitter, possibly in reaction to Twitter blocking Instagram’s friend import feature. Facebook and Google had earlier tussled over access to contacts data. Now, in a controversial move, Facebook has slammed the ban hammer on F.B. Purity.

F.B. Purity, which stands for Fluff Busting Purity, is a browser extension (actually an userscript) that promises to get rid of all the bloat from Facebook. It filters out the annoying and irrelevant pieces in your newsfeed, such as application spam, ads, and sponsored stories. F.B. Purity’s relationship with Facebook has always been tenuous. Facebook had threatened to ban F.B. Purity as far back as 2010 for infringing on its trademark. However, the developer managed to reach an agreement with Facebook and the script survived.

Now, Facebook is outlawing F.B. Purity because “Facebook’s terms specifically prohibit interference with the way Facebook is rendered to its users”. It also alleges that the script breaks Facebook’s ToS as it doesn’t connect via Facebook API, which is the approved method for interacting with Facebook’s services. Last time around Facebook tried sniffing F.B. Purity to render it useless. However, the developer managed to quickly find a workaround. So, this time Facebook didn’t even try. Instead, it banned the developer’s Facebook account, imposed a site-wide ban on the fbpurity domain, and threatened legal action.

Of course, a cursory investigation of the way F.B. Purity works is sufficient to unravel Facebook’s allegations. F.B. Purity is neither a Facebook client nor a Facebook application. It’s an userscript or an browser extension. It doesn’t directly access Facebook’s services. It’s a client-side script that modifies the page after the browser has downloaded it. In some ways it can be considered to be a browser feature. Hence, its ridiculous to force F.B. Purity to use Facebook’s APIs.

Facebook owns its services, and as such is free to do whatever it feels like. However, its latest complaint against F.B. Purity is simply thinly veiled bullying. If courts start buying Facebook’s logic, pretty much all browser extensions and scripts including ad-blockers and pop-up blockers will become illegal. I can appreciate that Facebook is trying to protect its interest. But, it is doing so by clearly inconveniencing the users and stepping on their freedom. It should be up to the user to decide how he wants the pages to be parsed by his browser, not Facebook.

Facebook Messenger For Android Updated; Sign Up With Just Name And Phone Number

We have good news for Android smartphone and tablet users. Facebook recently rolled out a new update for its not-so-popular Messenger app. The latest update brings the ability to sign up with just your name and phone number. You heard it right! Now, even if you have not yet created a Facebook account, you can still use the Facebook Messenger app and connect with your friends on the go.

This feature was already available on the popular cross-platform mobile messaging app, Whatsapp, which allows you to sign up with just your name and phone number. The first countries to get this feature are Australia, India, Indonesia, South Africa and Venezuela. Facebook will roll out this feature for users in other countries in the coming weeks.

Similar to Whatsapp, the Facebook Messenger app allows you to send messages and images to anyone on your phonebook and does not even require a Facebook log-in. Currently, this update is available only for Android users and the company is planning update their iOS app in the coming days.

Rumor Has It That Facebook is Looking to Buy WhatsApp

Everybody’s been questioning if Facebook is actually going to acquire the Internet’s most loved and poplar messaging tool WhatsApp. No one from Facebook (or the WhatsApp developers team) has replied to any of the queries about the acquisition. However, with no official confirmation, this still remains a rumor.

The news was first reported by TechCrunch earlier today leaving several users on the Internet wondering if it’s really going to happen, and if it does so, it would be one of the worst things to happen, as WhatsApp users tweet out of frustration on Twitter.

Facebook, in fact, is currently looking forward to boost and improvise mobile experience for Facebook users, and perhaps this deal could make some ‘sense’ to them, however, if the deal goes through, I think it is neither right for Facebook, nor it is right for WhatsApp. However, what Facebook can learn from WhatsApp is making its current Facebook mobile services a lot better, very much similar to WhatsApp offers, rather than making it the other way round, if they have any plans to do so.

Facebook to Buy WhatsApp

The cross-platform instant messaging application was developed in 2009 by Santa Clara, California based company, and is available for Android, BlackBerry, iOS, Symbian, and Windows Phone, delivering text messages as well as images, audio, and video messages. The app, however, is ad-free and reportedly has about 100 million daily users, with a presence in 250 countries on a variety of platforms.

The developers of WhatsApp have their own reasons and explicitly disallow adverting on WhatsApp. However, that said, it could change if the deal is trough. There are possibilities that if Facebook takes control over the app, they could even use it to sell mobile ads as the company is currently looking to effectively optimizes advertisements for its mobile service.

The social networking company’s current most high profile acquisition is the photo-sharing company Instagram, which it finalized the deal for a whopping $1 billion. Well, we still aren’t sure if Facebook is really going to acquire WhatsApp, and we also do not have any details on how much Facebook is looking to spend.

Don’t Bother About Facebook Privacy Notice That Your Friends Are Sharing – It’s False

Several number of Facebook users are posting and sharing about Facebook privacy notice that declares their copyright ownership of all content they post on the social networking site. If you are wondering what the fuss is all about, then don’t bother about it, as the message shared by your friends and other users is simply a hoax.

This isn’t the first time that this hoax message is spreading on Facebook. Earlier in July, we had reported that a fake “Facebook privacy notice” spreading across the network, with users copy-pasting the message on their Timeline. The message reportedly confers copyright privileges to individual Facebook users that are different than the ones they agreed to when using the service.

False Facebook Privacy Notice

This is one of the biggest problems with Facebook. Users blindly update their Timeline with such hoax message, which eventually creates a controversy. It illustrates how little users know about their digital rights and wanting to take control over what they post on Facebook.

The so-called “privacy notice” that users are spreading across the network reads as follows:

In response to the new Facebook guidelines I hereby declare that my copyright is attached to all of my personal details, illustrations, graphics, comics, paintings, photos and videos, etc. (as a result of the Berner Convention). For commercial use of the above my written consent is needed at all times!

(Anyone reading this can copy this text and paste it on their Facebook Wall. This will place them under protection of copyright laws. By the present communiqué, I notify Facebook that it is strictly forbidden to disclose, copy, distribute, disseminate, or take any other action against me on the basis of this profile and/or its contents. The aforementioned prohibited actions also apply to employees, students, agents and/or any staff under Facebook’s direction or control. The content of this profile is private and confidential information. The violation of my privacy is punished by law (UCC 1 1-308-308 1-103 and the Rome Statute).

Facebook is now an open capital entity. All members are recommended to publish a notice like this, or if you prefer, you may copy and paste this version. If you do not publish a statement at least once, you will be tacitly allowing the use of elements such as your photos as well as the information contained in your profile status updates…

The message mentions that any violation of user’s privacy is punishable by law – Uniform Commercial Codes “UCC 1-103 1-308,” which is nowhere related to Facebook’s privacy policy. This clearly makes its inclusion irrelevant, and the entire message a fake.

Facebook has made an official announcement stating that the above spreading message is a rumor:

There is a rumor circulating that Facebook is making a change related to ownership of users’ information or the content they post to the site. This is false. Anyone who uses Facebook owns and controls the content and information they post, as stated in our terms. They control how that content and information is shared. That is our policy, and it always has been. Click here to learn more –

This rumor is very much similar to “Facebook or its third-party advertisers to user photos in ads“, which also has been reportedly spreading rapidly on the social networking giant.