Tag Archives: Facebook Hoax

14-year-old Boy Was Shot 6 Times by His Stepfather Facebook Hoax

No, Facebook will not donate any money if you share or “like” a post. End of story.

This has been probably told like a thousand times earlier, yet users on Facebook continue to share messages that have statements such as, “Facebook will donate $$ every time you share or “like” the post.”

Today I spotted a new hoax message on my Facebook news feed, which tells a story of a young kid who is in need of money for his life saving surgery. The message circulating is as follows:

A 14 YEAR OLD BOY WAS SHOT 6 TIMES BY HIS STEPFATHER. THIS BOY WAS PROTECTING HIS LITTLE 6 YEAR OLD SISTER WHO WAS ABOUT TO BE RAPED BY THIS POOR… EXCUSE OF A MAN. THE LITTLE GIRL DID GET HURT, THANKS TO HER BRAVE OLDER BROTHER. THEIR MOM WAS AT WORK WHEN THIS HAPPENED. NOW THIS BRAVE YOUNG LITTLE BOY IS FIGHTING FOR HIS LIFE,BUT DOCTORS SAY HE WILL NOT SURVIVE UNLESS HE GETS AN OPERATION WHICH IS COSTLY AND HIS MOM CANNOT PAY. FACEBOOK COMPANIES HAVE AGREED TO DONATE 45 CENTS FOR EVERY TIME SOMEONE SHARE THIS MESSAGE SO, PLEASE CLICK SHARE SO THAT TOGETHER WE CAN HELP SAVE THIS BOUS LIFE……NSFTBC! If you had a heart you’d do it, It will only take a minute of your time!

14-year-old Shot - Facebook Hoax

Reading the story makes you feel sad, however, none of it is true. To all those users who believe that this story is true and are sharing it over and over again, please stop it. This is simply a hoax message.

Mark Zuckerberg or Facebook does not make any such donations by getting users to “like” or “share” a photo or message. This isn’t something new as we have seen several such hoax and spam messages spreading across the social network.

It is always advised that users verify such information before spreading it across to their friends. A quick search on Google will help you find out whether the message is a fake or not.

We at Techie Buzz always try to keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. You can follow our dedicated Facebook page where we report all spreading scams – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

Facebook Padlock Security Warning Hoax Message

Recently Facebook enabled a new feature on its site called as the “Privacy Shortcuts” that provides users the ability to easily and quickly make changes to your profile’s privacy settings. The update also brings “an easier-to-use Activity Log, and a new Request and Removal tool for managing multiple photos you’re tagged in.”

However, users on Facebook are spreading a false message, which indicates that hackers can gain access Facebook accounts if users answer the low security message –

Facebook Padlock Security Warning Hoax

Facebook Padlock Security Warning Hoax:

HACKERS ALERT….. ATTENTION!!!!! IF ANY OF YOU GET A PADLOCK ON TOP RIGHT HAND CORNER OF FACEBOOK HOME PAGE SAYING YOUR SECURITY IS LOW.. IGNORE.. DO NOT, DO NOT, DO NOT ANSWER THE QUESTIONS.IT IS SO HACKERS CAN ACCESS YOUR ACCOUNT. COPY & PASTE PLEASE

Please understand that the new icon is enabled only to easily access your privacy settings and to avoid confusion. There is no such threat of hackers that the message above claims to be. The shortcut icon cannot be removed and there’s absolutely no harm to your Facebook accounts.

The above message spreading is simply a hoax. Hoax messages like the one above isn’t something new. There have been several such hoax messages reportedly spreading and spamming the social networks. It is always advised that users verify such information before spreading it across to their friends. A quick search on Google will help you find out whether the message is a fake or not.

We at Techie Buzz always try to keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. You can follow our dedicated Facebook page where we report all spreading scams – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

 

Don’t Bother About Facebook Privacy Notice That Your Friends Are Sharing – It’s False

Several number of Facebook users are posting and sharing about Facebook privacy notice that declares their copyright ownership of all content they post on the social networking site. If you are wondering what the fuss is all about, then don’t bother about it, as the message shared by your friends and other users is simply a hoax.

This isn’t the first time that this hoax message is spreading on Facebook. Earlier in July, we had reported that a fake “Facebook privacy notice” spreading across the network, with users copy-pasting the message on their Timeline. The message reportedly confers copyright privileges to individual Facebook users that are different than the ones they agreed to when using the service.

False Facebook Privacy Notice

This is one of the biggest problems with Facebook. Users blindly update their Timeline with such hoax message, which eventually creates a controversy. It illustrates how little users know about their digital rights and wanting to take control over what they post on Facebook.

The so-called “privacy notice” that users are spreading across the network reads as follows:

In response to the new Facebook guidelines I hereby declare that my copyright is attached to all of my personal details, illustrations, graphics, comics, paintings, photos and videos, etc. (as a result of the Berner Convention). For commercial use of the above my written consent is needed at all times!

(Anyone reading this can copy this text and paste it on their Facebook Wall. This will place them under protection of copyright laws. By the present communiqué, I notify Facebook that it is strictly forbidden to disclose, copy, distribute, disseminate, or take any other action against me on the basis of this profile and/or its contents. The aforementioned prohibited actions also apply to employees, students, agents and/or any staff under Facebook’s direction or control. The content of this profile is private and confidential information. The violation of my privacy is punished by law (UCC 1 1-308-308 1-103 and the Rome Statute).

Facebook is now an open capital entity. All members are recommended to publish a notice like this, or if you prefer, you may copy and paste this version. If you do not publish a statement at least once, you will be tacitly allowing the use of elements such as your photos as well as the information contained in your profile status updates…

The message mentions that any violation of user’s privacy is punishable by law – Uniform Commercial Codes “UCC 1-103 1-308,” which is nowhere related to Facebook’s privacy policy. This clearly makes its inclusion irrelevant, and the entire message a fake.

Facebook has made an official announcement stating that the above spreading message is a rumor:

There is a rumor circulating that Facebook is making a change related to ownership of users’ information or the content they post to the site. This is false. Anyone who uses Facebook owns and controls the content and information they post, as stated in our terms. They control how that content and information is shared. That is our policy, and it always has been. Click here to learn more – www.facebook.com/policies

This rumor is very much similar to “Facebook or its third-party advertisers to user photos in ads“, which also has been reportedly spreading rapidly on the social networking giant.

Stay Privately Connected Facebook Hoax

A new hoax message appears to be spreading on Facebook, and this time it is about Facebook’s privacy issues. According to the message, users are requesting to be privately connected with thier friends in order to avoid friends of friends to view activities like photo “likes” and comments.

Here is the hoax message that has gone viral on Facebook:

“To all my FB friends, may I request you to please do something for me: I want to stay PRIVATELY connected with you. However, with the recent changes in FB, the public can now see activities in any wall. This happens when our friends hit “like” or “comment”, automatically, their friends would see our posts too. Unfortunately, we cannot change this setting by ourselves because Facebook has configured it this way. So I need your help. Only you can do this for me. PLEASE place your mouse over my name above (do not click), a window will appear, now move the mouse on “FRIENDS” (also without clicking), then down to “Settings”, click here and a list will appear. REMOVE the CHECK on “COMMENTS & LIKE” by clicking on it. By doing this, my activity amongst my friends and my family will no longer become public. Many thanks! Paste this on your wall so your contacts would follow suit too, that is, if you care about your privacy.”

The message is a hoax and most of it contains inaccurate information. Facebook has not done any recent changes to its privacy settings that enable the “public” to view your Facebook activities, unless you have set your privacy settings to “Public”.

From the message, it is known that users are concerned about their activities and photos being visible to friends of friends when a particular friend “likes” or comments on it. These activities are not shown on their news feed, but actually dislayed on the rolling real time list of what your friends are doing – the Facebook Ticker.

If you’re concerned about what you post on your Timeline could be visible to friends of friends via the Facebook Ticker, then there’s a solution to avoid that – Stop using the “Friends of friends” setting. This is why every second degree contacts will be able to view your posts and photos that your friend “likes” or comments on.

To change this, go to your Facebook privacy settings and click the edit settings of “Timeline and Tagging,” and change the visibility to “Friends” only:

Timeline and Tagging

 

However, to avoid this, you will have to convince your friend/s to do the same. Additionally, “limit” all previous posts you have made via the privacy settings – According to what Sophos says, “this will change everything to “friends” only and will stop people you deleted but did not block, people who sent you friend requests that you ignored, and friends of friends from seeing your activity.”

Funny, but Samsung Did Not Pay Apple $1bn in 5 Cent Coins

Over the past few days, the Internet has sparked with Apple-Samsung verdict as the federal jury slapped Samsung with a $1 billion penalty for violating Apple’s patent rights. In the wake of this, there have been rumors spreading in the past couple of days that Samsung cleared the $1 billion penalty by paying it in 5 cent coins.

The rumor on Samsung paying Apple in nickels spread like wildfire. It is reported to be spreading from the website MobileEntertainment, however, it is known that it originated from a Mexico-based parody website El Deforma, which was then carried over by 9gag users and made it as a cartoon.

Samsung Galaxy

The actual message that was spreading across Twitter and Facebook was this:

“Yesterday, more than 30 trucks filled with five cent coins arrived at Apple’s headquarters in California. Apple security were in the process of freaking out before Apple CEO Tim Cook was called by Samsung explaining that they will pay all of the $1.05 billion they owe Apple in coins, and this was the first instalment”.

Funny, but sadly this is not true and Samsung did not pay Apple by sending trucks filled with nickels. When I first read about it and tweeted stating that it is a hoax, I never thought the same rumor would spread this far.

Twitter user Ken Tindell tweeted, “a nickel weighs 5g. It would take 2,755 18-wheeler trucks (max legal tare 80,000 lbs) to carry the money.” Just for fun, here’s how much a billion dollars in nickels would weigh: At 5g each that’s 0.005 kg x 20,000,000,000 = 100,000,000 kg = 100,000 tonnes.

As a matter of fact, Samsung hasn’t been ordered to pay the $1 billion to Apple yet. It’s just a jury’s verdict. According to  The Guardian, “Samsung’s fine ($1.049bn) isn’t yet payable; the judge hasn’t ruled. All we have is the jury’s verdict. The judge’s decision, which could include a tripling of the fine, is due on 20 September (or possibly 6 December now; it’s unclear). Until then, Samsung only has to pay its lawyers. That should be less than $1bn”.

The funny part was Yahoo considered this as story and featured it on one of its pages!

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Robert Pattinson Dies in Car Accident Facebook Hoax

Rumors about the death of the Twilight star Robert Pattinson have been circulating on Twitter and Facebook over the last few days. With the recent shocking news about Robert’s long-time girlfriend Kristen Stewart had cheated on him, rumor states that Pattinson died due to emotional stress, and was found lying in a pool of blood in his bathtub.

The rumor noticed on Facebook is as follows:

Robert Pattinson of TWILIGHT Died becuase nervous breakdown due of emotional stress. They found him lying on his bath tub along with blood. Police are now investigating. Watch the video on how the neighbors save ROBERT PATTINSON (18yrs & above) ->> [LINK]

The link provided in the message takes you to a Facebook application page, where you are asked to grant permission for the app to access your personal information and also post updates on your behalf. Clicking the “Allow” button will provide the scammer to post Wall updates on your Facebook profile, and spam your friends’ news feed. It is recommended that you avoid clicking on the link.

A similar rumor is spreading about the death of Robert Pattinson, but this one provides a different cause of death. It states that Pattinson died in a single car accident on route 80 between Morrisville and Roswell.

 “Very sad news, especially for all the Twilight fans, Robert Pattinson died in a single car accident on route 80 between Morrisville and Roswell. He died on July 29, 2012, at the age of 26…. Friends and family are mourning the loss of a loved one.”

Death hoax about celebrities are nothing new, and Pattinson is not the first actor to fall victim to such a hoax. In the recent past, there have been several such death hoax messages spreading on Facebook and Twitter, which included Arnold SchwarzeneggerKeanu Reeves and Mickey Rourke.

You can read about our earlier articles on how to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Also don’t forget to bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams and subscribe to our Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Facebook Photograph Showing “Black” Lion is a Fake

Earlier today, while I was on Facebook, I stumbled across a post shared by a friend of mine containing a photo of a “black” lion. Although I knew that something was wrong about the photo, I did a simple search on Facebook, and to my surprise found a boatload of users sharing it. However, the photo is a fake, or in other words, it has been digitally manipulated.

The message is spreading across Facebook as follows:

Black Lion… :-) How many likes for him?

Black Lion….only 1 alive…..in the world. can we get maximum likes 4 dis amazing pic…Share N tag PLS…

The one and last black Lion in the world….extinction on its way.

The Last Black Lion Alive at Norway Zoo . Really Awesome . :)

Facebook Black Lion Hoax

Don’t fall for this hoax message as the picture in the message has been digitally manipulated to make it look like a “black” lion. The picture was fabricated by a DeviantArt user – Pavol Dvorský. The original photo, which is a white lion, can be found at Cute Home Pets website, which discusses about questions and answers about considering to own a white lion as pet.

Here’s the original photo of the white lion:

White Lion - Original Photo

The only animal-relation that I could find to a “black lion” is the black lion tamarin, also known as the golden-rumped lion tamarin, found in Brazil. However, the black lion tamarin is a type of monkey, and not a lion.

Users need to be aware of this as scammers on Facebook might take it up as an advantage and trick users into clicking malware links, or download them as a program.

Hoax messages like the one above isn’t something new. There have been several such hoax messages reportedly spreading and spamming the social networks. It is always advised that users verify such information before spreading it across to their friends. A quick search on Google will help you find out whether the message is a fake or not.

We at Techie Buzz always try to keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. You can follow our dedicated Facebook page where we report all spreading scams – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

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“Share” and Facebook Will Donate $1 to Starving Kids – Facebook Hoax

Yet another hoax message is reportedly spreading on Facebook, and this time it is about Facebook donating money for “sharing” a picture of an unhealthy child. This isn’t the first time we’re seeing such a message spreading on Facebook. This appears to be similar to one of the hoax messages that was reported last month – Facebook to Donate 50 Cents for Every “Like.”

The hoax message is spreading with the following message and a picture of a child –

I am not asking you to click “like” but i am asking you to please click share.

For every share of this pic Facebook will donate 1$ to the starving kids all over…

Facebook to Donate Starving Kinds - Hoax

The message claims that Facebook will be donating $1 in order to help starving children every time the picture is shared on the network. However, this is not true, and there is no such donation done by Facebook.

People generally create such messages in order to generate “likes” and “shares” on Facebook. Doing this wouldn’t benefit them in any way, however, they are motivated by the desire to accumulate large numbers of likes and shares on Facebook.

It’s true that sharing such messages creates an awareness, however, “liking” or “sharing” will not help this or any other child in any way. It is always advised that users verify such information before spreading it across to their friends. A quick search on Google will help you find out whether the message is a fake or not.

We at Techie Buzz always try to keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. You can follow our dedicated Facebook page where we report all spreading scams – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

John Cena Dies In Car Crash Hoax

A new hoax message has surfaced on the social networking site Facebook, which claims that the American professional wrestler and actor, John Cena, died in a car accident on Route 80 between Morristown and Roswell. However, the message spreading is false and is a rumor.

At the time of writing this post, John Cena posted an update on his Twitter account with a message stating that he has an important announcement to make at RAW –

John Cena - Twitter Update

Well, by this update, it is clear that John Cena is safe, and the message – John Cena Dies in Car Crash hoax spreading spreading across Facebook and Twitter is not true. It is recommend that you stop spreading the message and also inform your friends about it.

John Cena Dies in Car Crash

Upon clicking the link on Facebook, you will be warned that the page you are visiting is not safe and may contain malware programs that could be harmful to your computer. However, the website that the link leads to contains the following speculated message –

John Cena died in a single vehicle crash on Route 80 between Morristown and Roswell. He was pronounced dead at the scene by paramedics responding to the vehicle accident and was identified by photo ID found on his body. Alcohol and drugs do not appear to have been a factor in this accident – June 26, 2012

Scammers create such rumors in order to drive traffic to their bogus websites. Sometimes, you are asked to download malware programs that are programmed to gather your personal information stored on your computer. It is highly advised that you avoid clicking such links on Facebook.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

American Rapper Vanilla Ice Responds to Death Hoax Spreading on Facebook

A new hoax message about Vanilla Ice being killed in a car crash is spreading across social media sites Facebook and Twitter. Messages circulating about his death are not true, as Robert Matthew Van Winkle a.k.a Vanilla Ice has confirmed in a tweet that he is alive, and the message spreading is a fake.

According to rumors, here’s how Vanilla Ice died:

Vanilla Ice died in a single vehicle crash on Route 80 between Morristown and Roswell. He was pronounced dead at the scene by paramedics responding to the vehicle accident and was identified by photo ID found on his body. Alcohol and drugs do not appear to have been a factor in this accident – June 17, 2012.

A version of the hoax spreading on Facebook has the title “Vanilla Ice Dies in Car Crash” along with a link to a website –

Vanilla Ice dies in car crash - Hoax

Clicking the link will lead you to a site where you’ll find the fake article containing the news about the death of the American rapper.

However, Vanilla Ice was quite surprised to learn about the “car crash” message, and spanked down the rumors that are spreading on Facebook and Twitter by sending out a tweet to his followers –

Vanilla Ice Tweet

Hoax messages like the one above (about the death of celebrity stars) isn’t something new. There have been several such hoax messages reportedly spreading and spamming the social networks. Some of which includes, Keanu Reeves Dies in Snowboard Accident, and International Rockstar Legend Jon Bon Jovi Dead at 49.

It is always advised that users verify such information before spreading it across to their friends. A quick search on Google will help you find out whether the message is a fake or not.

We at Techie Buzz always try to keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. You can follow our dedicated Facebook page where we report all spreading scams – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

Image credits: facecrooks.com