Google Plays Catch-up with Facebook

On March 15, 2012, Mark Zuckerberg officially reported via his Facebook status the launch of the social networking site’s new data center in Lulea, northern Sweden, being the first outside the US. While Facebook experiences massive upsurge in European subscribers, this data center aims to make Facebook usage faster for European subscribers. This server hopes to provide better performance as it will serve as a node for customers closer to its physical location.

Facebook and Google at War

According to Sustainable Brands, Google aims to open three new data centers in Taiwan for a combined cost of $700 million, scheduled to go online in the second half of 2013. The new systems aspire to reduce operating costs while electricity prices start to approach soaring heights.

This is not the first time Facebook and Google are competing against each other. In late 2010, Facebook announced the introduction of “Facebook Mail” to oust Google from one of its dearest products, “GMail” while in mid 2011, Google introduced its version of Facebook, “Google+”. As data continues to attain more importance, both these players seem to realize the significance of data centers. Nonetheless, has Google been impulsive in its approach to announce three data centers on the go? Or has it been entrepreneurial?  What is up next? A beginning of a new war on the development of the cloud? Whatever it turns out to be, it surely will be interesting.

Microsoft Building $112 Million Datacenter In Wyoming

Wyoming: There’s a place that we don’t hear about much. Nevertheless, the state with the smallest population of any U.S. state is making headlines in the tech blogosphere today as, according to Datacenterknowledge, Microsoft will be erecting a $112 million data center in the area. The blog received comment from the state’s governor, who is quite enthusiastic about the tech giant’s project in the region:

“Microsoft’s decision recognizes that Wyoming is a hand and glove fit as a leading site for data centers and technology-related companies,” said Gov. Matt Mead. “Wyoming is a perfect fit for data centers. We have abundant, affordable energy. Our naturally cool climate decreases costs for data centers and we have redundant fiber optics.”

However, Microsoft didn’t just choose Wyoming for nothing. $10.75 million in incentives offered by the state — which includes $5 million in funds approved by the Wyoming legislature to boost data center recruitment, interestingly enough — may have certainly swayed them to use the cowboy state as their location. “Microsoft said we would not be having this conversation without the data center incentives,” said Mead.

Microsoft seems to be really taking the cloud seriously lately. The company just announced a few days ago that it has launched two additional U.S. Azure data centers, one in the west coast and one in the east coast. Specific locations weren’t announced, but MJF did speculate that the east coast location is in Virginia, and the west coast location is in Iowa.

To the cloud!