ngc 1277

Possibly the Largest Black Hole Discovered

Astronomers led by Remco van den Bosch, from the Max-Planck Institute in Heidelberg, Germany have discovered a massive black hole at the center of a galaxy 250 million light-years away. The black hole has a mass equivalent to 17 billion of our sun. It is quite possibly the largest black hole ever discovered and is turning galaxy evolution models on their side.

ngc 1277
Image credit: NASA / ESA / Andrew C. Fabian / Remco C. E. van den Bosch (MPIA)

Picture above, you can see the disk shape galaxy NGC 1277 that was captured by the Hubble Space Telescope. At the center of this galaxy is the black hole that scientists are saying accounts for 14% of the galaxy’s weight. To put the size of this black hole in perspective, our own milky way galaxy has a black hole equivalent to the mass of 4 million suns. NGC 1277 has the mass of 17 billion suns!

It has typically been thought that the mass of a galaxies black hole correlates to the mass of the stars in a galaxy. After this discovery however, it seems that theory may not be true. The ratio of this black hole to the mass of the stars in its galaxy are way off the typical charts. Small disk shaped galaxies typically have much smaller black holes that usually account for less than 1% of their mass. Finding one that accounts for 14% of its mass is truly rare. Black holes of this size are usually found elliptical galaxies.

It appears after further examination that this phenomenon isn’t as rare as once thought. Other black holes with similar characteristics have been found since NGC 1277 was discovered to contain a super massive black hole. According to a Space.com article, Remco van den Bosch is quoted as saying, “You always expect to find one sort [of a phenomenon], but now we have six of them,” van den Bosch said. “We didn’t expect them, because we do expect the black holes and the galaxies to influence each other.” It appears now scientists will have to determine if this phenomenon only exists in the early universe and how this information affects our theories of galaxy evolution.

For more information, visit the journal Nature.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>