And add a few more suns...

Discovered: A Planet With As Many As Four Suns!

Forget the world, the Sun is not enough. Astronomers have found a planet outside our own Solar System, which has as many as four suns! Yes, this planet, thought to be a gas giant, orbits four different suns.

And add a few more suns…


The planet was discovered by volunteers who were using the website, which allows enthusiastic astronomy amateurs access to a lot of data from NASA’s Kepler’s Space telescope. Kepler is built specifically for detecting exoplanets. The planet, named PH1, after the website, is just 5000 light years away, a stone’s throw away on the cosmological distance scales.

The technical ArXiv report is here:

The planet is believed to be about the size of Neptune, just a bit larger. The interesting thing about this planet is the number of suns – there are four of them. Now, maintaining a stable orbit around four different suns is a very difficult and delicate problem. While it is moderately difficult to calculate the stable orbit configurations around one star, it is a huge pain to do it around two stars and impossible for four suns! There are virtually no stable points in the gravitational field in the region, where the planet can reside for an indefinite period of time.

Gravitational Confusion

We all know a single star – our Sun is an example. Now, imagine another star around it. This forms a binary system of stars. These are very abundant in the Universe – two stars circling around each other – and these reveal a lot of information about star formation and their subsequent evolution. Now, add two more stars orbiting this central binary system of stars! This is a highly improbable configuration. These outer stars will have a very hard time following a stable orbit around the core binary.

Now, throw in a gas giant planet in the mix! And what you get is utter confusion, if you could somehow see the pattern in the gravitational field. No one knows for how long this planet has existed or for how long it will exist.

One can only imagine the spectacular sunrise and sunset on the planet, but then all four suns won’t be rising or setting at the same time.

Published by

Debjyoti Bardhan

Is a science geek, currently pursuing some sort of a degree (called a PhD) in Physics at TIFR, Mumbai. An enthusiastic but useless amateur photographer, his most favourite activity is simply lazing around. He is interested in all things interesting and scientific.