Unknown “Ball of Fire from Sky” Causes Explosion In Buenos Aires, Argentina

Something big is up in Buenos Aires, Argentina and it’s unknown. There appears to have been some sort of fireball crashing into the earth, but this is unconfirmed. The casualties include one  dead and at least nine injured. The cause is still unknown, some suspecting a meteorite crash, other sticking to a burning plane or a gas line explosion. Eyewitnesses claim that a mysterious “ball of fire from the sky” was the cause of the explosion.

Strange fire in Buenos Aires. This was the supposed 'fire ball'.

The event took place very early in the morning – at 2:00 AM local time and thus most people were asleep. The explosion destroyed two houses, one store and a few parked vehicles. According to Bad Astronomy, the fireball was red in colour, but other news  reports say that it was blue.

Just to allay fears, we hasten to add that it was not NASA’s falling satelite, UARS, since that had hit the ocean a couple of days back. We had already told you why you shouldn’t get worked up about the falling satellite. There is no way some junk could’ve been hanging around in the atmosphere for two days. That is simply impossible.

Some people suspect that it was a a burning airplane that crashed, but there has been no wreckage found. Officials have also ruled out any gas leak related explosion.

Frankly, at this point we don’t know. Let us not bring aliens and a crashed UFO into the picture. Let the extra-terrestrials be as they are, please.

We will update as soon as we have some more news. As cliched as it may sound, we would ask you to stay tuned.

11 thoughts on “Unknown “Ball of Fire from Sky” Causes Explosion In Buenos Aires, Argentina”

  1. Dozens of people in different places saw the fireball falling. The people in the neighborhood heard a whistle, then a huge explosion. Several injured, and a peruvian or paraguayan (not clear) woman died. The investigators have discarded the gas line theory and some are considering space junk (not necessarily a piece of UARS) or an extremely small micro-comet.

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