Category Archives: Scams

Starbucks Giveaway Scam Spreading on Pinterest

By now, most of you would have tried out the pin board styled social photo sharing site Pinterest, which was launched last year. Pinterest allows its users to create and manage collections of images based on a theme and share the same with their followers as well as their friends on Facebook.

Pinterest aims to “connect everyone in the world through the ‘things’ they find interesting.” The newly added networking site is picking up and gaining popularity tremendously.

However, with this success, scammers have already taken advantage of the popularity of the site to spread scam messages and bogus links in order to trick users by asking them to enter their personal information or financial details.

Just like how scams are spreading on the popular social networking site Facebook, Pinterest too is now affected by these scams.

TrendLabs and various other sources have notified their readers about a recent scam that broke out on Pinterest and has been spreading across the network like wildfire.

Starbucks Free Giveaway - Pinterest

The logo of Starbucks along with the message – “Starbucks is giving away free gift cards to all Pinterest users!” has been spreading across the new social networking site. Users are asked to click on a link, which will lead them to a bogus site where they are asked to answer a set of online surveys. Users are also asked to “Pin it” in order to be qualify for the giveaway contest.

As I mentioned earlier, this is simply a scam message and there are no gift cards given away for free. Scammers are only trying to trick users by asking them to answer the online surveys. It is highly recommended that you avoid clicking the Starbucks giveaway message link and do not waste your time by answering any online surveys.

We recommend that you avoid clicking on such messages if you come across on Pinterest, Facebook, or Twitter. We always keep our readers updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. We will make sure to keep you updated on the scams spreading on Pinterest as well. Bookmark our Techie Buzz Scams page. Alternatively, you can follow our dedicated scams page on Facebook – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

Do Not Add “Kelly Hargrove” as Your Facebook Friend – Facebook Virus Hoax

A new hoax message has emerged out on the social networking site Facebook, with users creating awareness of the message asking their friends not to accept friend requests sent by “Kelly Hargrove”, “Jason Lee”, or “Linda Smith”, since it is a virus. The message that users are sharing on the network is false and is completely not in accordance with fact or reality.

There is no such virus on Facebook, which will harm your computer by accepting a friend request from the mentioned names. The message has also been spreading on Twitter and indicates that the name itself is a virus and adding the person to your friend list will harm your computer by downloading the virus. It also states that the information “has been confirmed” and asks users to “share” the message on their Facebook Timeline and warn their friends about it.

… CRITELLI*, KELLY HARGROVE, ALSO IF SOMEBODY CALLED *KELLY HARGROVE* ADDS YOU, DON’T ACCEPT… IT IS A VIRUS. TELL EVERYBODY, BECAUSE IF SOMEBODY ON YOUR LIST ADDS THEM, YOU GET THE VIRUS TOO. **COPY AND PASTE AND PLEASE RE POST* THIS HAS BEEN CONFIRMED BY FACEBOOK AND SNOPES Raquel Critelli is in fact Kelly Hargrove’s account .. it was just confirmed …it is a hacker account.!!! Pass this on people, spread the warnings please !!!!!!!! repost to your family and friends

Do Not Add as Friend - Facebook Virus Hoax

There are several version of the message with different names. These messages are completely false and there are no such viruses named after these users. Your computer will not be infected by any virus by accepting a friend request or adding a user to your friends list. Messages like these have been spreading from the last three years and in order to make difference in the appearances of the message, spammers make subtle changes like the name and alter a few other details.

Although the message states that the information has been “confirmed”, it however does not reveal who confirmed it or on what basis the information was confirmed. This clearly shows that the message is a fake. There is no point in creating any awareness and users should avoid spreading messages like this.

Some versions of the message state that the information has been confirmed by Facebook and other organizations like, Symantec, McAfee or Snopes. However, there is no such confirmation available by these companies. Not even Facebook!

Before you “share” a message like this, make sure you do a quick search on Google to check whether the information is true or not. Reputed blogs will make a note about it whether the information is correct or simply a fake.

Now that you’ve known that the message is a fake, make a good deed by letting your friends know about it by sharing this post with them. Also, make sure that you inform the original poster of the message that the message is simply a hoax.

We always keep our readers updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. So, make sure you’ve bookmarked our Techie Buzz Facebook Scams page. Alternatively, you can follow our dedicated scams page on Facebook – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

OMG Check Out This, Jumping Crab Video Facebook Scam

A new video scam called "OMG Check Out This Jumping Crab", similar to the check out my home video scam is spreading on . The scam is dangerous because it downloads a virus/malware to your computer.

The Facebook scam is spreading with the following message:

OMG! CHECK OUT THIS? Jumping Crab learn more about jumpingbaby

Of late, I have seen this scam spread with several different messages. However, it looks like the people behind the scam are similar because they are targeting people and asking them to install a "DivX Plugin" and a " premium plugin". DO NOT Install anything because it is a malware/virus.

Jumping Crab Scam

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

No, Facebook Will Not Require Social Security Number for Log In

Lately, there has been a hoax message spreading across the social networking site Facebook, indicating that the site is planning to add a new security feature where users will have to enter their Social Security Number (SSN) in order to successfully log in to the site.

Here’s the message that has been spreading across the network –

Facebook will Require Social Security Number for Member Log In. [LINK] Today, Facebook announced a new procedure to address the recent wave of spam that has plagued the website. Starting April 2nd, users will be required to enter their social security numbers to log in to their Facebook accounts.

There is no such announcement made by Facebook, and it is pointless to integrate such a feature on the site. Social Security number is issued to U.S. citizens, both permanent and permanent resident, under section 205(c)(2) of the Social Security Act. Facebook has over 850 million users worldwide and the procedure would simply not work in anyway.

The hoax message originated from the site – FreeWoodPost.com with the following statement –

The new member log in format will be both safe and efficient for our users who fear having their Facebook identity stolen. The requirement for users to enter their social security numbers during log in, will completely take away the element of spam from unauthorized access. With cooperation from the United States government, we have compiled a database to verify that each person’s social security is accurate. Also, the last four digits of each users social will be displayed in their info section of their profile. Further upgrades to security are currently being planned, and will be announced as more information is given.

Social Security Number Log in - Facebook Hoax

Users on Facebook have taken this hoax message seriously, and are spreading the same on their Timelines and updating their friends about the hoax by sharing the post link. The site – freewoodpost.com has the following line in one of the posts – “Remember, our tagline is “News That’s Almost Reliable”… a purely satirical and humorous “news” website,” which clearly indicates that articles published on the site are generally cooked up and nothing is true about it.

The site invites contributors to write for their blog and mentions that they’re only looking for articles that are “outrageous political humor that is indirect and satirical.”

Thus, please make sure that you avoid “sharing” such false messages on Facebook. A quick search on Google will provide you with details whether the information you’re sharing is true or simply a hoax.

We always keep our readers updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. So, make sure you’ve bookmarked our Techie Buzz Facebook Scams page. Alternatively, you can follow our dedicated scams page on Facebook – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

Beware of “Free Apple iPad 3″ Offers

Don’t get excited if you find a Page on Facebook that states – You stand a chance to win a “Free iPad 3.” They’re all fake offers and there is no Apple iPad’s given away. In fact, Apple has not announced the iPad 3, and users who are not aware of this fact, generally click on such messages. Such users should avoid clicking these messages and stop them from spreading on Facebook.

There are over hundreds on Facebook pages created by scammers and even small companies who are desperately looking for “likes” for their company’s official Facebook Page. The fake pages created have the title – “Win Free iPad 3″, “Free iPad Giveaway”, and many more, are only used to trick users and get them to “like” the public pages on Facebook.

For instance, we found a company called ‘Ezivoucher KL’ that as posted an update stating that Facebook users who “like” their company page will stand a chance to win a free iPad. This is a simply ridiculous way to generate “likes.” They’ve also asked users to post the comment “I Love Ezi Ipad” on their Facebook Timeline.

Here’s a screenshot of a user sharing the message –

Free Apple iPad 3 Giveaway on Facebook

There are several such Pages created on Facebook, and it is advised not to fall for such tricks and complete the mentioned steps. There is no way you will get a free iPad or any other gift by simply “liking” an image or a Facebook Page.

Here’s another example of a fake giveaway offer –

We are an expert in Gadget! We will be launching our website soon with more than 1000 products! and we are giving away free iPad 2’s! All you have to do is follow these steps:

1- Like our page [link]

2- Like the Photo

3- Share the photo on your wall and comment by writing “Give me Ipad2″

PLEASE NOTE : YOU MUST DO ALL STEPS OR YOUR ENTRY WILL NOT BE VALID.

DO NOT complete the steps whatsoever! Sometimes scammers trick users by posting content like this in order to get users complete online surveys. They even try to extract your personal information as well as financial details, like credit card number or bank account number. Entering these details will pose serious threats to your accounts, so please avoid entering your credentials.

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

Arnold Schwarzenegger Dies in Snowboard Accident Hoax

Like always, scammers are trying to kill another popular celebrity on the social networking site . A new scam is spreading on Facebook where some obscure and fake website is reporting that Hollywood actor and hero of movies like Terminator; Arnold Schwarzenegger has dead in a snowboard accident.

After spreading a scam saying Keanu Reeves Dies In Snowboard Accident, they are now spreading a similar scam for Arnold Schwarzenegger . The scam is spreading with the following message:

Arnold Schwarzenegger dies in snowboard accident

Arnold Schwarzenegger lost control of his snowboard and struck a tree at a high rate of speed

Clicking on the link in question leads to a website which has the following message:

Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger is reported to have died shortly after a snowboard accident earlier today -March 1, 2012.

The actor & novice snowboarder was vacationing at the Zermatt ski resort in Zermatt, Switzerland with family and friends. Witnesses indicate that Arnold Schwarzenegger lost control of his snowboard and struck a tree at a high rate of speed.

Arnold Schwarzenegger was air lifted by ski patrol teams to a local hospital, however, it is believed that the actor died instantly from the impact of the crash. The actor was wearing a helmet at the time of the accident and drugs and alcohol do not appear to have played any part in his death.

Additional details and information will be updated as it becomes available. This story is still developing

The story comes from the same fake website which also spread Keanu Reeves death earlier. While they don’t generally download virus/malware to your computer, they definitely are making money through the traffic and spreading false rumors. They are also using the opportunity to advertise a Ski resort. Earlier in December 2011, we had also reported the hoax spreading on Facebook about the death of International rock star legend Jon Bon Jovi.

The website in question is a satire website used to generate fake celebrity news. It also states that it is fake in its copyright notice:

FAKE… THIS STORY IS 100% FAKE! this is an entertainment website, and this is a totally fake article based on zero truth and is a complete work of fiction for entertainment purposes! this story was dynamically generated using a generic ‘template’ and is not factual. Any reference to specific individuals has been 100% fabricated by web site visitors who have created fake stories by entering a name into a blank ‘non-specific’ template for the purpose of entertainment. For sub-domain info, name removal requests and additional use restrictions: FakeAWish.com

Copyright © 2011 FakeAWish.com All rights reserved.

While killing celebrities is nothing new for scammers, they have been also using dead celebrities to further their scams. For example, recently they used the deaths of Amy Winehouse and Whitney Houston to spread spam messages on Facebook.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Check Out My Homemade Video Facebook Scam

Another new video scam is spreading on where users are being enticed with names of celebrities and more spreading a so called "homemade video".

Homemade Video Facebook Scam

The Facebook scam is spreading with the following message and uses names of celebrities and friends as well.

OMG! CHECK OUT THIS? Check Out my homemade video, View the Suck Video of my Partner. My Sex Video for you. View My xXx Site. Watch H O T S 3 X Video happened On TV. freefreefri.us.mn.

The site in question fools the user by spoofing the Facebook website and asking users to disable their Antivirus software. However, DO NOT DO IT because the app may install virus or malware on your computer.

If you click on the video link will download an executable which will spoof the VLC player and install viruses and Trojans on your computer. So stay away from it. There have been several other nasty video scams on Facebook lately including the Justin and Selena bedroom hidden camera scam and Whitney Houston death scam among others.

In addition to downloading virus/malware on your computer it will also post the message on your wall thus making your friends a target.

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

Hidden Camera in Selena and Justin’s Bedroom Facebook Scam

Yet another scam related to Justin Bieber and Selena Gomez has been found spreading on the social networking site, Facebook. The earlier scams we reported were “Selena Gomez Caught On (LEAKED Tape) and the Justin Bieber” and “Selena Gomez New Kissing Video Leaked!!!.”

The new scam titled – “Omg. There was a hidden camera in Selena & Justin’s bedroom” is spreading across the social network and has already attracted thousands of users to click on the scam link.

Hidden Camera Salena Justin Bedroom

Clicking on the scam message will take you to a bogus page where a fake video player will be displayed. Clicking on the play button will open up a pop-up message box asking you to complete online surveys before you can watch the video. This in turn will click-jack and like-jack you Facebook account by automatically posting the same scam message on your Facebook Timeline.

Note: The scam uses multiple domains. You may see variations in the landing pages, but they are all the same.

Hidden Camera in Selena and Justin's Bedroom Facebook Scam

The other version of the scam has the title – “Oops!!! There was a hidden camera in Selena & bieber’s bedroom.

Scammers trick users by posting content like this in order to get users complete online surveys. Sometimes, they try to extract your personal information as well as financial details, like credit card number or bank account number. Entering these details will pose serious threats to your accounts, so please avoid entering your credentials.

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

FREE Victoria’s Secret Gift Card!! (limited time only) Facebook Scam

After the Victoria’s Secret Valentine  Day Gift Card another new scam is brewing up on where scammers are pretending to give away free Vitoria’s Secret gift card for a limited time.

Victoria's Secret Gift Card Scam

The new scam is similar to the other Gift Card scams which have been doing the rounds of Facebook lately and asks users to complete a survey before they can get hold of the Victoria’s Secret Gift Card. The scammers ask the users to post the page to their profile and also like the Facebook page using the Facebook like button.

However, clicking on the "Like button" on the Facebook scam page will take you to a page where the scammers will collect your email address and then collect your personal information and then ask you to complete a survey before you can get your gift card.

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been a main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

OMG! My Profile Has Been Viewed 97 Times Just Today Facebook Scam

Just a few days after the Profile Watcher scam erupted on Facebook another new similar scam app is now spreading rapidly on . The scam is similar to the earlier See Who Has Viewed Your Profile Event Spam and Who Checked Your Facebook Profile Scam fools users into believing that they can track who has viewed their Facebook profiles.

Facebook Who's Watching Profile App Scam

Profile viewed scams are becoming very common these days since people are concerned as to who are viewing their profiles. Potential Employees also run background checks on users which include checking their social networking profile which makes users more jittery and gullible to know such kind of information.

Facebook Profile Viewer Scam

However, the app which is called "Stalker viewer" is basically a scam since Facebook does not share such information with others and it is difficult for apps to find out who is visiting your Facebook profile.

The "Stalker Viewer" app looks like just any other Facebook app and will ask for your permissions before taking you to a page where they will ask you to complete a survey before you can see "Who’s viewing your Facebook Profile". However, once you complete the survey it will only make money for the scammers and not show you the information you are looking for.

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.