Play Mario Kart on Facebook – Facebook Scam

A new scam is reportedly spreading on Facebook, which claims that you can play Mario Kart on Facebook for free. This is click-jacking and like-jacking scam, which also offers you to complete some online surveys.

The scam is titled Play Mario Kart on Facebook!and has the following description – “Play Mario Kart on Facebook with your Friends! Join the multiplayer mayhem NOW! Click here to play”. Please avoid clicking on the scam link, and DO NOT share the message on your Facebook Wall. It is also reported that the scam message has been spreading via private messages.

Play Mario Kart on Facebook - Facebook Scam

Play Mario Kart - Facebook Scam

Clicking on the scam link will take you to a bogus webpage which contains a link that urges you join the game by clicking on the “Play Now” button. Clicking the button link will click-jack and like-jack your Facebook account, and will automatically posting the message and “like” it. Alongside, it also asks you to complete the following online surveys in order to continue playing the game –

Play Mario Kart - Survey Scam

Please DO NOT complete any surveys. All these are fake links and might result in downloading malware programs on you computer. These malware programs are designed to gather user information and user credentials like credit card numbers, which are then sent to the scammer. Scammers are paid money to generate traffic or get users to complete such online surveys.

Don’t be tricked by this scam which will definitely put you in a trap. Surprisingly, when I clicked on the link using a test account, I was thrown with a warning message by WebSense. This is very first time that  I’ve  noticed a warning message from WebSense. Facebook partnered with WebSense in order to warn users about unsafe links.

Facebook - WebSense Warning

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or  scam messages  on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to  Facebook Security.

With over 800 million users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been a main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on  removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about  Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Bookmark  Techie Buzz Facebook Scams. We always keep you updated with the  latest scams spreading on Facebook.

Woman Kills Pregnant Woman & Cuts the Baby from Her Dead Body – Facebook Scam

Yet another scam is spreading on Facebook and this time it promises users to show a video of a woman brutally killing a pregnant lady.

The scam titled – “Woman Kills Pregnant Woman & Cuts The Baby From Her Dead Body Because Her Boyfriend” has been spreading for hours on Facebook. There’s no video shown in the website link provided in the message.

Woman Kills Pregnant Woman & Cuts The Baby From Her Dead Body Because Her Boyfriend - Facebook Scam

Clicking the URL will take you to a fake page where you are asked to verify your age by clicking the “I Agree” button. However, the button is not used to verify your age, but to “share” the scam message on your Facebook wall. From the screenshot below, you can notice the line – “By clicking Share link you certify that you are 18 years old and that you do not violate the Terms of Service.” This clearly indicates that the scammer’s intention is to spread the scam message and spam the entire social network. However, after you have shared the video, you will be asked to complete a set of surveys, but there is NO video shown.

Woman Kills Pregnant Woman & Cuts The Baby From Her Dead Body Because Her Boyfriend - Facebook Scam

Please do not “share” the scam message across your wall. There is no video shown even after the message has been shared. Instead you will be redirected to another fake page or asked to complete a set of online surveys. Scammers’ usually create such scams to generate traffic to their fake websites.

Please beware that the website you are visiting might silently download malicious programs without your knowledge. These malware programs are designed to gather user information including email ids, user names, passwords and credit card details.

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to  Facebook Security.

Here is an article about  Avoiding Facebook Likejacking and Clickjacking scams. We have also compiled a list of  Most Actively Spreading Scams on Facebook  on Facebook for you to look through and avoid.

You might also want to  use a security application for protecting you from Facebook scams. As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on  removing apps from Facebook.

Free Starbucks $50 Gift Card – Facebook Scam [UPDATE]

UPDATE:  Starbucks tweeted to its 1.7 million followers on Twitter, warning them that a gift card offer on Facebook is fake and asking users not to fall for the trick.

“Beware – there is a scam on Facebook offering a  free $50 Starbucks card.  Don’t click on it, it isn’t real.”

Starbucks Warns Users

A Facebook scam that we reported yesterday indicated – “Free $25 Tim Hortons Gift Card” which tricked users in giving away a free $25 gift card by asking them to share and provide their personal details. A similar scam that I noticed on my Facebook Wall today was – “FREE Starbucks $50 Gift Card”.

Free Starbucks $50 Gift Card - Facebook Scam

The scams spreading on Facebook has a description that reads – “To celebrate our 40th Anniversary, we are giving away thousands of $50 Gift Vouchers FREE” along with a link to a bogus website. Clicking the link will take you to the bogus site where you are asked to “share” and add a comment “Happy Birthday”. Once done, you are then redirected to another page where you are asked to enter your email ID in order to claim the gift card.

Free Starbucks Gift Card

After you have entered your email ID, you are again redirected to another page where you are asked to fill out your personal information like name, age, and mobile number. However, despite completing all the steps, there is no free gift card given.

The entered details will be sold to third-party individuals or marketing organizations, who will make use of it to spam with SMS updates and junk emails. The best way to deal with such scams is ignore the them or avoid filling out the form. If you find this particular scam post on your Facebook Wall, then you can delete it by clicking the “x” on the top-right corner of the post.

Please note that scams like this use multiple domain and different web pages. You may see variations in the landing pages, but they are all the same.

Despite Facebook taking precautionary measures by officially launching a document called Guide to Facebook Securityand partnering with a web based security firm WebSense, there hasn’t been much improvements in reducing the number of scams spreading on Facebook. However, we at Techie Buzz make sure that our readers stay up to date with the latest threats and scam messages spreading on Facebook and elsewhere. So, make sure you’ve liked us on Facebook and signed up to receive free email alerts.

Shocking Video From Steve Jobs’ Last Business Meeting – Fake Video

“Steve died peacefully today surrounded by his family”. These were the words that were released by Steve Jobs’ family members in response to his death. This clearly indicates that Steve Jobs died in the presence of his close relatives and family members.

Keeping that in mind, here’s a video which has been spreading like wildfire on Facebook and other social networking sites, and generating millions of views. The video was first uploaded on popular video sharing site Vimeo on August 31, 2011, which was later uploaded on YouTube on October 6, 2011.

The video, however, is a fake and the person in the video is not Steve Jobs. From the video we learn that the fake Steve is in a meeting with some unidentified people, and suddenly in the middle of a conversation, Jobs lowers his head and faints and slips down from his chair, creating panic in the room.

Now here’s the thing. I can assure that the video is a fake for three reasons. One, a part of that video was taken from an interview with Steve by All Things Digital in 2010. There are five parts of the video and I’m sure it was taken from any one of these. From the interview video, you will notice that Steve is sitting on the same red chair which is showed in the fake video. Here’s the fifth part of the interview –

Bizarrely, the above video was uploaded on October 6, 2010.

The second reason why I find the video is a fake is that Steve Jobs resigned as the CEO of Apple on August 24, 2011, and the upload date of the video is August 31, 2011. Steve Jobs after his resignation never came back to work or never attended any important meetings as such. And lastly, the other reason is that neither Apple nor any of Steve’s family members have confirmed about the video. So, it’s pointless to assume that the video is genuine.

I believe that the video was created to drive traffic to the site TheFinalEdition.com. The post in which the video was posted states – “TheFinalEdition.com has just received the above video shot during Steve Jobs’ last, secret business meeting.”

This clearly tells us that the owners of the site created the video just to attract visitors and nothing else. And now you see the video link being circulated on Facebook and other social networking sites.

I recommend that you please avoid “sharing” or “liking” the video, and delete the post if you come across on your Facebook wall. We had also seen scammers taking advantage of the death news of Steve Jobs and were spreading scams like Apple Giving Away 1000 Limited Editions iPad 2  across the social network giant,  Facebook.

Nicki Minaj Sex Tape – Exclusive!!! – Facebook Scam

Update: Another scam about Nicki Minaj is being spread on Facebook with the message “Nicki Minaj Gets Caught on Tape (LEAKED Tape)“, so please stay away from it.

A new scam on  Facebook  is underway, which claims to show a sex video of the hip hop and R&B recording artist, Nicki Minaj who recently rose to fame after becoming a member of the rapping group Young Money.

The scam titled – “NlCKl MlNAJ S E X TAPE – EXCLUSIVE!!!” comes along with a description which reads – “Her boyfriend gave this tape to a BBC Reporter. Watch it live before it is taken down by her lawyers” is a click-jacking scam, and is spamming the entire social network.

Niki Minaj Sex Tape - Facebook Scam

The scam is spreading in different version. One of the versions will take you to a bogus BBC News webpage, which contains an image that appears like a YouTube video player. Clicking on the play button will click-jack and like-jack your Facebook account, and will automatically post the message on your wall. The message will spread across your friends news feed, who will then be a victim of the scam.

After clicking on the play button, you will be redirected to another page where you will be asked to complete a set of online surveys. However, even after completing all the surveys, there isn’t any video shown.

The other version of the scam is a  Facebook  application. The application will request you to grant permissions to post messages on your Facebook wall. By granting permissions to the app, the app will constantly start spamming your wall with the scam message. The app might also gain access to your personal information and photos.

I recommend that you avoid clicking on the scam message if you come across it. It is dangerous to click on unsolicited URLs as it may automatically download malware programs, which are designed to gather user credentials like username, password and credit card details, and email them to cyber-criminals without your knowledge. Recommend your friends to avoid clicking on this message or alert them by sharing this post.

If you come across this post, you know what to do. Delete it! Alert your friends by asking them not to share or likethe message. Alternatively you can report the scam to the  Facebook  Security  team. Also, please  go through the official document released by Facebook, which will definitely help you tackle scam messages. The document is available for free and you can  download  a copy of it from the  Facebook Security Page.

We have also compiled a list of  Most Actively Spreading Scams on Facebook  that you might want to have a look at. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about  Avoiding Facebook Likejacking and Clickjacking scams. Don’t forget to share this post with your  friends  and  alert  them about the scam.

We constantly report scams and hoax messages that are spreading on Facebook. You can always stay updated by bookmarking this link –  techie-buzz.com/scams

Funny Hoax on Facebook’s Privacy Settings

I thought that hoax messages like Professional Hacker Named ‘Faceb Hu’ Trying to Hack Facebook Accountand Worst Ever Virusare usually created to scare users on Facebook, but today I came across a funny hoax message indicating that there is a new issue related to Facebook  privacy which will peek into your bathroom and steal your towel while you shower.

Here’s the complete message –

Facebook Privacy Settings Joke

NEW PRIVACY ISSUE WITH FACEBOOK! As of tomorrow, Facebook will creep into your bathroom when you’re in the shower, smack your bottom, and then steal your clothes and towel. To change this option, go to Privacy Settings > Personal Settings > Bathroom Settings > Smacking and Stealing Settings, and uncheck the Shenanigans box. Facebook kept this one quiet. Copy and Paste on your status to alert the unaware

That’s really an unusual and a funny message related to Facebook’s privacy settings. However, Graham from Sophos identified the similar post, but also noticed something very strange. He found that the post was shared publicly to “everyone” on Facebook.

This isn’t a security threat, however, on a serious note, before sharing something on Facebook, make sure that you always check whom you are sharing it with. For instance, if you happen to share a personal information with “friends” or a certain group, but accidently post it as “Public”, then obviously it wouldn’t remain personal anymore.

Facebook Sharing

From the above image you can notice that you can always choose whether you want to share the information publiclyor just with friends. So double-check before you share anything on Facebook. Here are my current (custom) privacy settings on Facebook. These settings control who can see what I share.

Facebook Custom Privacy Settings

To configure your privacy settings, go to Accountsand click on Privacy Settings. I hope this will help you configure privacy settings appropriately for your personal information.

I recommend you to go through the official document released by Facebook, which will definitely help you tackle scam messages. The document is available for free and you can  download  a copy of it from the  Facebook Security Page. In addition to that, I have written an article which explains on How to prevent your Facebook account from being hacked.

Free iPhone 5 Giveaway – Facebook Scam

Earlier this week, it was reported that an Apple employee lost yet another iPhone prototype in a restaurant and bar in San Francisco. Now that Apple is working with the police to recover the missing iPhone prototype, scammers have already started to create pages and post updates on Facebook, trying to trick users by offering them free iPhone 5.

Even though Apple hasn’t officially announced the iPhone 5, users on Facebook  are falling for the trick by completing the steps required to claim the device. Here is a post that I noticed while I was on Facebook:

Free iPhone 5 Giveaway - Facebook Scam

The scam titled – Get the New iPhone 5 – Pre Release Giveaway” has a message that states “Many people are asking us that why are we giving away the iPhone 5 for free?, which increases users curiosity to know the answer to that question, and ultimately lead them to click on the link.

Clicking the link will take you to a bogus webpage, where you will see the answer to the questions as “The answer is our gaming advertisers and sponsors pay us for each of our promotion. And the  iPhone 5 for our Visitors are financed by our advertisers and sponsors. So it’s free for both, you and us.”

In order to claim the reward, you are asked to complete three steps which include, likingthe Facebook  page, sharing it with your friends and posting a message that you got a free iPhone 5 along with the link to the bogus webpage.

Recently we reported a fake Facebook contest, which indicated that Facebook is Giving 100000 Apple iPod Free. However, this was reported as a scam, and Facebook took down the page immediately.

Please note that there is NO iPhone 5 given for free. Forget about the free giveaway, Apple hasn’t announced iPhone 5 yet, so there’s no point in taking part in such contests. DO NOT likeor share the message with your friends. If you come across posts like this, please delete it or report it to the Facebook Security team.

Scammers create such posts to loot users. Sometimes you will be asked to complete online surveys by providing your credentials. Credentials that you enter are submitted to the scammer, who might then misuse it by stealing your money or hacking your accounts.

If you’re a Facebook  fan and want to stay updated on the latest scams, threats and security news, I would recommend you to bookmark the link – Techie-Buzz.com/tag/facebook-scam – where we regularly post the latest attacks or follow Techie Buzz on Facebook.

Facebook has come up with a 14 page document called Guide To Facebook Securitywhich will help its users understand the social network’s security features and possible ways to protect their account from threats like malware and phishing attacks. It also includes tips on how users can avoid  click-jacking and like-jacking scams.

I recommend you to go through the document which will definitely help you tackle scam messages. The document is available for free and you can  download  a copy of it from the  Facebook Security Page. You may also be interested in reading on  How to Prevent Your Facebook Account from Getting Hacked

Back to Old Facebook Profile – Phishing Attack

While there have been a number of phishing attacks reported earlier, cyber criminals aren’t giving up their luck, and are continuing to post phishing attacks on Facebook in an attempt to compromise user account and steal sensitive information. A new phishing  attack is underway on Facebook, which is trying to jester users by asking them to revoke to the old Facebook design.

Although users are annoyed with the recent changes that Facebook has made, cyber criminals are taking advantage of it by creating pages like Need Old Profile back, which has already attracted over 59,000 people to likeit. This is an attempt by cyber criminals to hack your Facebook account, so DO NOT likeor share the page with your friends.

Need Old Facebook Back - Phishing Attack

The Facebook  page has links that will lead to the following website –

Bring Back Old Facebook Profile - Phishing Attack

In the above webpage you are asked to follow a few steps which include likingtwo Facebook pages. Once done, you are then asked to click on the Click here to enterlink button, which will take you to a form hosted on Google Spreadsheets.

The form is titled – Facebook Converterin which you are asked to enter your Facebook  username and password. You really don’t have to do this. Since this is a phishing attack, your username and password will be sent to the scammer, who will have full control over your Facebook account.

Facebook Profile Converter - Phishing Attack

UPDATE: Google has deleted the form.

If you have accidently clicked on the link and completed the form, I advise you to immediately change the password of all your accounts. Please understand that there is no way to get back to the older version of Facebook. Facebook does not provide an option to its users to revert back to any of the previous versions. If you come across any applications or pages that claim to change your Facebook account to the older version, then please ignore or delete it. You can report such apps or pages to the Facebook Security  team.

However, there are browser  extensions  that will help your get back to the older versions of Facebook. Keith has written an article on How yo can change the new Facebook layout to the older one.

Avoiding such scams is not an easy task, but you can always follow caution. Check out the following post on to how you can  use a security application for protecting you from Facebook scams.

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on  removing apps from Facebook. We have compiled a list of  Most Actively Spreading Scams on Facebook  that you might want to have a look at.

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Red Arrow Crashes During Air Show Video – Facebook Scam

In a tragic incident, flight Lieutenant Jon Egging’s Hawk T1 jet crashed into a river during the Bournemouth Air Festival yesterday, after which he was pronounced dead.   This disastrous incident has got scammers to increase users’ curiosity by creating sensational headlines and promising them to show the crash video on Facebook.

The scam titled – “Red Arrow crashes during air show” leads to a Facebook page that contains an image which appears like a real YouTube player. Clicking on the play button will click-jack and like-jack your Facebook account automatically, and will reload the page with a set of surveys, which you will be asked to complete them in order to watch the video.

Red Arrow crashes during air show - Facebook Scam

However, there is no point in completing any steps or surveys, because there is no video shown at the end of the process. Scammers post Facebook scam messages like this to get users to “like” the message and complete surveys.

This scam is similar to the recent death video of the infamous Osama Bin Laden, Justin Bieber scam,  Miley Cyrus scam,  teen from Egypt commits suicide scam  and  girl killed herself after dad posted on here wall scam. The mode of operation of all these scams is similar, as they entice users to click on a link and then ask them to fill a survey while posting an update to their wall.

Scammers earn money by getting users to complete online surveys. Sometimes, users are asked to purchase surveys using credit cards, and the entered card details will be sent to the scammers, which could be further misused. They are also used to spread malware and obtain personal information.

If you come across this message, please ignore it or delete it from your news feed. Alternatively, you can report it to the Facebook Security team, and prevent other Facebook members from falling for the trap.

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on  removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about  Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams. Here’s an article that might help you protect your Facebook account from hackers –  How to Prevent Your Facebook Account from Getting Hacked

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Get A Free $100 Pizzahut Gift Card – Facebook Scam

Facebook’s anti-spam computer algorithm might have a way to tackle scam messages, but that doesn’t stop scammers from creating new scams and spreading them across the network. A new bogus offer is now underway, which offers users a “Free $100 Pizza Hut Gift Card” upon completing a set of surveys.

Get A Free $100 Pizzahut Gift Card! Facebook Scam

The message contains a link, www.FreePiesOn.us that leads to bogus webpage, which displays an alert box with a message in Hindi that states – “Congratulations! You are today’s 19th winner (current date). Please select a prize, enter your email address and enter your shipping information”

Entering into the site will display the following page:

Get A Free $100 Pizzahut Gift Card! Facebook Scam

There isn’t any relation between the title of the scam and the website that you are taken to. The title says that you will receive a $100 gift card from Pizza Hut, but you are taken to a site that contains affiliate links to coupon sites like SnapDeal and MyDala. The site also has a flashing title that states – “You are the winner of today”

On the bottom-right, you will notice a timer, which indicates that you need to claim the offer within the provided time, else it will expire. In order to claim the prize, you need to enter your email address and shipping details, which will completely compromise your privacy.

Clicking on the Continuebutton will take you the respective coupon site, where you will be asked to enter your email id to create a new account. Sometimes, you will be redirected to another page where you will be asked to purchase reward surveys by entering your credit card details.

If you come across messages like this, then please avoid clicking on them. Scammers create such scam messages to make money by tricking users to enter username, password and credit card number. I suggest you to remove the scam from your news feed by clicking on the Xmark on the top-right corner of the post. Alternatively you can report the scam to the Facebook Security team.

Facebook has come up with a 14 page document called Guide To Facebook Securitywhich will help its users understand the social network’s security features and possible ways to protect their account from threats like malware and phishing attacks. It also includes tips on how users can avoid  click-jacking and like-jacking scams.

I recommend you to go through the document which will definitely help you tackle scam messages. The document is available for free and you can  download  a copy of it from the  Facebook Security Page.