Look What This Girl Wore at the Beach Video Facebook Scam

A new scam message is reported to be speeding on Facebook, luring users to click on a video link that reveals about the outfit a girl wore at the beach. Before you get too excited and open the link, be warned that this is a scam message, and opening it will result in the automatic download of malware program, which could harm your computer.

The Facebook scam is spreading with the flowing message, title, and thumbnail as shown below:

Look what this girl is wearing at the beach in front of thousands of people (or) Look What This Girl Wore at the Beach

During the summer holidays, this girl took the opportunity to do something unheard of! I bet no one can do the same

Look what this girl wore at the beach

Clicking the link will take you to a site where you’ll find a video player that looks exactly like YouTube. However, this is a fake player, and upon clicking it, a pop-up box opens up asking you to take up an online survey before you can view the video.

After having completed the survey, you will redirected to another site, where a rogue browser extension will be installed on your system. This program is designed to Like-Jack your Facebook account, which “likes” and shares the same scam message with your friends without your knowledge. A similar version of this scam was reported earlier, however, it only had a bogus video player on the site.

Scammers generally create such scam messages to entice users and trick them to “like” or share messages on Facebook.

It is always recommended that you avoid clicking on scam messages. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

 

Facebook Scam Alert – Check Who is Spying Your Facebook Profile

A new variant of the “Who viewed my Facebook profile” scam has surfaced the social networking giant Facebook. This scam is very similar to those which we have reported earlier – OMG! My Profile Has Been Viewed 97 Times Just Today, See Who Has Viewed Your Profile, and Facebook Profile Viewer – Who Viewed Your Profile.

The latest scam — who is spying your facebook profile —  is spreading as follows:

OmG!! I Cannot imagine that you can now see who is been spying at your profile for real! You can easily check who is spying on you at-> [link]

Facebook Scam Alert - Check Who is Spying Your Profile

Clicking the scam will take you to the Facebook app installation page, where you are asked to grant permissions to the rogue app to post updates on your behalf and also access your information on Facebook. Providing access will put your Facebook account at high risk as scammers might try to hack it and steal all your information.

It is highly recommended that you avoid clicking on such spam messages on Facebook. It is also advised that you remove any apps that you have accidently given permission to access your Facebook information.

Here is a list of previously reported similar scam messages spreading on Facebook, and please make sure that you avoid them if you come across on your news feed:

Facebook has announced the launch of [email protected], an email address available to the public to report phishing attempts against Facebook. You can report such scam messages to Facebook, the security team from Facebook will delete the message entirely from Facebook.

It has always been a challenge on how to identify and avoid scams on Facebook. Here is a post providing you with some tips on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Additionally, you can bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

Stay Privately Connected Facebook Hoax

A new hoax message appears to be spreading on Facebook, and this time it is about Facebook’s privacy issues. According to the message, users are requesting to be privately connected with thier friends in order to avoid friends of friends to view activities like photo “likes” and comments.

Here is the hoax message that has gone viral on Facebook:

“To all my FB friends, may I request you to please do something for me: I want to stay PRIVATELY connected with you. However, with the recent changes in FB, the public can now see activities in any wall. This happens when our friends hit “like” or “comment”, automatically, their friends would see our posts too. Unfortunately, we cannot change this setting by ourselves because Facebook has configured it this way. So I need your help. Only you can do this for me. PLEASE place your mouse over my name above (do not click), a window will appear, now move the mouse on “FRIENDS” (also without clicking), then down to “Settings”, click here and a list will appear. REMOVE the CHECK on “COMMENTS & LIKE” by clicking on it. By doing this, my activity amongst my friends and my family will no longer become public. Many thanks! Paste this on your wall so your contacts would follow suit too, that is, if you care about your privacy.”

The message is a hoax and most of it contains inaccurate information. Facebook has not done any recent changes to its privacy settings that enable the “public” to view your Facebook activities, unless you have set your privacy settings to “Public”.

From the message, it is known that users are concerned about their activities and photos being visible to friends of friends when a particular friend “likes” or comments on it. These activities are not shown on their news feed, but actually dislayed on the rolling real time list of what your friends are doing – the Facebook Ticker.

If you’re concerned about what you post on your Timeline could be visible to friends of friends via the Facebook Ticker, then there’s a solution to avoid that – Stop using the “Friends of friends” setting. This is why every second degree contacts will be able to view your posts and photos that your friend “likes” or comments on.

To change this, go to your Facebook privacy settings and click the edit settings of “Timeline and Tagging,” and change the visibility to “Friends” only:

Timeline and Tagging

 

However, to avoid this, you will have to convince your friend/s to do the same. Additionally, “limit” all previous posts you have made via the privacy settings – According to what Sophos says, “this will change everything to “friends” only and will stop people you deleted but did not block, people who sent you friend requests that you ignored, and friends of friends from seeing your activity.”

Stay Away from ‘WhatsAppDude,’ a Fake Facebook App Site

Facebook with over 950 million users has always been the target to spread bogus links and scam messages. Scammers have also created Facebook apps that help them to spread scam messages across the social networking site.

In order to trick users, scammers design web pages that look similar to a Facebook page by using the same combination of colors and fonts that Facebook uses. We found once such website called “WhatsAppDude,” which has been tricking users into using fake Facebook apps and try to collect user information in the background without the user’s knowledge.

The site also uses the sub-domain fb. whatsappdude.com in order to make it appear as a real Facebook application site. Some of the fake apps that we found on the website are:

  • Find your mental age
  • Find what Google says about you?
  • Find your funny death forecast.
  • What your birthday says about your career?
  • What does your eye color say about you?
  • How old do you look?
  • Find your true love’s name
  • Fool my friend
Whatsappdude - Fake Facebook App Site

Surprisingly, none of these apps are actually served by Facebook as they are hosted by a third-party web server. When you try to use these apps, you are asked to connect it with you Facebook profile. The app named “whatsappdude” will be asked to grant permissions to access your information on Facebook, including your personal details, and also post updates on your behalf.

Granting the app with these permissions will spam your Timeline with scam messages, which in turn may trick your Facebook friends.

According to WOT’s Scorecard, it is know that the site has a poor reputation:

WOT "whatsappdude" Rating

WOT’s reputation ratings are based on real user ratings and they tell you how much other users trust this site.

The site “whatsappdude” is highly not recommended, and in case you have visited the site and granted permissions to the app to use your Facebook details, we advise you to immediately revoke its access. In order to do so, go to your Facebook Account Settings and click on the “App” option on the left menu. Click on the “x” mark on the right-hand side of the app, and confirm that you want to stop using it. You can also delete all the app activity since the time of its installation.

Scams on Facebook are quite difficult to identify. We have provided some tips on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams, and also share them with your friends on Facebook. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

Wow! Your Photo is Cool Twitter Spam

There’s seems to be a spam message spreading on Twitter, where users are posting and re-tweeting about a photo with a shortened URL to a website. The message spreading is “WOW! your photo is cool” along with a link.

Spammers have created a Twitter bot that has been randomly sending the spam message to Twitter users by mentioning them in the tweet. When you search on Twitter for the message, you will see a number RTs and @ replies the message has received. The results are displayed in real-time and you can also notice the number of tweets flowing in related to the message.

Your Photo is Cool - Twitter Spam

Upon clicking the link, you will be redirected to a bogus page where you will be asked to download an application program. Please DO NOT download this whatsoever as this is a malware program that is designed to steal user information.

Generally, malware programs collect information such as email id, passwords, contact numbers in the background and sends them to the automatically to scammer without your knowledge. It is recommended that you avoid clicking on any suspicious links on Twitter or Facebook.

Sometimes you will be redirected to your Twitter profile and ask permission to install an app. Such apps will then send out rogue messages as a direct message to all your followers and continue spreading the malware message across the social networking site.

You will also get a warning message from your browser indicating that the site you are visiting could be potentially harmful to your computer as such:

Chrome Warning

There are a number of scam messages spreading on Twitter and Facebook, and it advised to be careful before clicking any links. Some of the phishing attacks on Twitter have spread through DM messages like “You Seen What This Person is Saying About You Terrible Things” and “Somebody is Saying Real Bad Rumors About You“.

Funny, but Samsung Did Not Pay Apple $1bn in 5 Cent Coins

Over the past few days, the Internet has sparked with Apple-Samsung verdict as the federal jury slapped Samsung with a $1 billion penalty for violating Apple’s patent rights. In the wake of this, there have been rumors spreading in the past couple of days that Samsung cleared the $1 billion penalty by paying it in 5 cent coins.

The rumor on Samsung paying Apple in nickels spread like wildfire. It is reported to be spreading from the website MobileEntertainment, however, it is known that it originated from a Mexico-based parody website El Deforma, which was then carried over by 9gag users and made it as a cartoon.

Samsung Galaxy

The actual message that was spreading across Twitter and Facebook was this:

“Yesterday, more than 30 trucks filled with five cent coins arrived at Apple’s headquarters in California. Apple security were in the process of freaking out before Apple CEO Tim Cook was called by Samsung explaining that they will pay all of the $1.05 billion they owe Apple in coins, and this was the first instalment”.

Funny, but sadly this is not true and Samsung did not pay Apple by sending trucks filled with nickels. When I first read about it and tweeted stating that it is a hoax, I never thought the same rumor would spread this far.

Twitter user Ken Tindell tweeted, “a nickel weighs 5g. It would take 2,755 18-wheeler trucks (max legal tare 80,000 lbs) to carry the money.” Just for fun, here’s how much a billion dollars in nickels would weigh: At 5g each that’s 0.005 kg x 20,000,000,000 = 100,000,000 kg = 100,000 tonnes.

As a matter of fact, Samsung hasn’t been ordered to pay the $1 billion to Apple yet. It’s just a jury’s verdict. According to  The Guardian, “Samsung’s fine ($1.049bn) isn’t yet payable; the judge hasn’t ruled. All we have is the jury’s verdict. The judge’s decision, which could include a tripling of the fine, is due on 20 September (or possibly 6 December now; it’s unclear). Until then, Samsung only has to pay its lawyers. That should be less than $1bn”.

The funny part was Yahoo considered this as story and featured it on one of its pages!

[via]

Your Friend Added a New Photo with You Facebook Scam

Facebook users are being warned about an email that may appear like an official Facebook email notification, which indicates that the user has been tagged in a photo by a close friend. The email contains attachments that are actually malware programs, which could be harmful to your computer.

According to this report by Naked Security, the email contains the subject line, “Your friend added a new photo with you to the album,” along with the following message:

Greetings,

One of Your Friend added a photo with you to the album.

You are receiving this email because you’ve been listed as a close friend.

[View photo with you in the attachment]

Facebook Email Scam

The link contained in the email will download an malware program, which could be designed to steal user information. Sophos products intercept the malware as Troj/Agent-XNN. This program copies itself to “C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\svchost.exe” and also create a registry key as “HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run

If you receive any such email that is claiming to be from Facebook, simply mark it as spam. Facebook does not send email notification about photo tags with any attachments in it. If in case you have accidently clicked on the attachment, then it is recommended that you scan your computer for any malware programs.

Such scam messages are common, and the scammers who create these messages mainly target Facebook users as they can easily get users to fall for such tricks.

Facebook currently has over 950 million users visiting per month, and the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scam messages. Although it is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook, we have provided some tips on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

Free Woolworths Voucher Worth $500 Facebook Scam

A new scam message has surfaced the social networking giant Facebook, claiming to giveaway free Woolworths voucher. The message is a typical survey scam, which asks for your personal and contact information in order to claim the “gift.”

The message is spreading as follows:

Claim your Free $500 Woolworths Voucher. Only a few left.

Get Free Woolworths Voucher

This is a bogus message, and currently there is no such official Woolworths promotion running. Clicking the link provided in the message will take you to a page where you are asked to “like” and “share” the message with your friends. You will then be redirected to an online survey page, where you are asked to enter your contact information such as your email id and mobile phone number.

The scammers are misusing the details entered by selling them to third-party services. Many users, who have fallen for this scam trick, ended up entering their mobile number. Scammers are now bombarding the users with several calls and text messages.

It is recommended that you DO NOT click on such links or scam messages on Facebook. If you come across this scam message, please delete/remove the scam from your Facebook news feed immediately. Alternately, you can report the scam to Facebook Security.

Also, as a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Facebook currently has over 950 million users visiting per month, and the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scam messages. Although it is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook, we have provided some tips on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

Free iTunes Card Codes Facebook Scam

There seems to be a new scam message spreading on Facebook, and this time it is the iTunes users who have been targeted. The new scam message spreading on Facebook promises users with free iTunes card codes, which they can redeem it after completion of certain steps. However, this is a fake promotion, and there is no such iTunes card codes given away for free.

The message is spreading as follows:

Get your free iTunes card pin codes here for free! Supplies are limited so get yours before we run out! [Link]

Free iTunes Codes Facebook

Clicking the message link will take you to a bogus web page, where you are provided with instructions on how to get “download” an iTunes gift card code. In the first step, you are asked to share the page on Facebook with friends. In the second step, you are asked to share the same page on any other social media tools listed on the page. Finally, you are asked to post an update on your Facebook wall stating that you have received a free card code for iTunes.

None of the above steps will get you a free iTunes gift code. You are only spamming your friends news feed by spreading this false message. It is recommended that you DO NOT click on the message link, or share it with your friends.

A similar scam that we reported was the Get Costco Gift Card for FREE! (Limited time only). Make sure you avoid such scam messages. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams. We always keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook.

I suggest you to remove the scam from your news feed by clicking on the “X” mark on the top-right corner of the post. Alternatively you can report the scam to the Facebook Security team.

Please note that scams like this use multiple domain and different web pages. You may see variations in the landing pages, but they are all the same.

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Facebook Profile Viewer – Who Viewed Your Profile Scam

Although the social media giant Facebook has taken measures to eradicate spam and hoax messages from its site, spam messages are continuing to galore as may users are falling for tricks set by hackers and spammers in an aim to steal user information.

Today, I noticed yet another scam message spreading across Facebook. The new scam tricks users into installing a rogue Facebook application, promising them to show the list of users who viewed their profile.

Although this particular scam has been reported earlier a several times, with users being warned not to click on such messages, yet users continue clicking it and install the Facebook app. The new variant is very much similar to previous scam messages, and attempts to steal personal information from tricked Facebook users.

Did you know? 14 million Facebook Accounts are used to spread spam messages.

The new scam is spreading with the title Facebook Profile Viewer containing the following messages:

Yes! I can’t believe that you can see who is viewing your profile! I just saw my top profile viewers and I am SHOCKED from who are viewing my profile! You can also see WHO VIEWED YOUR PROFILE [link]

WOW I just saw my top 10 profile VIEWERS. You can now see who’s been stalking at your profile for real! You can easily check who’s spying on you at [link]

My total profile views today:

Male Viewers: 31
Female Viewers: 64
See your total views and who is viewing you here: [link]

Facebook Profile Viewer Scam

Clicking the scam will take you to the Facebook app installation page, where you are asked to grant permissions to the rogue app to post updates on your behalf and also access your information on Facebook. Providing access will put your Facebook account at high risk as scammers might try to hack it and steal all your information.

The app looks like just any other Facebook app and will ask for your permissions before taking you to a page where they will ask you to complete a survey before you can see “Who’s viewing your Facebook Profile”. However, once you complete the survey it will only make money for the scammers and not show you the information you are looking for.

Here is a list of previously reported similar scam messages spreading on Facebook:

As a precautionary measure, always check which applications you use and remove unwanted or suspicious ones. If you aren’t sure how to do it, you can always check our guide on removing apps from Facebook. In addition to that, don’t forget to check out our article about Avoiding Facebook Lifejacking and Clickjacking scams.

Last week, Facebook announced the launch of [email protected], an email address available to the public to report phishing attempts against Facebook.

With over 955 million monthly active users on Facebook, the social networking giant has always been the main target for spreading scams. It is quite difficult to identify scams on Facebook. Here is a post on How to Identify and Avoid Facebook Scams. Bookmark Techie Buzz Facebook Scams or Subscribe to Scam Alert Feed. We always keep you updated with thelatest scams spreading on Facebook.