Microsoft Slaps Motorola With Patent Infringement Lawsuit; Demonstrates That Android Could Be Costlier than Windows Phone 7
By on October 3rd, 2010

Some one familiar with Microsoft’s mobile strategy recently claimed that Android isn’t actually free, and could turn out to be costlier than Windows Phone 7. Microsoft is pricing Windows Phone 7 at $15 per license. Several manufacturers are already working on WP7 devices and Windows Phone 7 is supposed to officially launch on October 11.

Technically, using Android isn’t exactly free. There are several hidden costs. Each OEM creates its own custom UI and needs to pay for certain licenses.

It is also known that lawsuits over Android IP disputes are quite costly in the long run.

Microsoft recently announced that it was suing Motorola for patent infringement related to Android. The lawsuit concerned a lot of software features in Android devices. The disputed features include receiving email on the go, calendar synchronization and battery and signal notifications.

What’s strange is that Microsoft chose to sue Motorola, instead of Google, which created Android. Even stranger is the fact that it isn’t suing HTC which uses the same Android OS in its phones.

SearchEngineLand has insinuated that it’s possibly because HTC is still a major mobile partner for Microsoft and is launching multiple devices powered by Windows Phone 7. Motorola, on the other hand, has made it clear that it will only support Android on its mobile devices.

This could be a strategy by Microsoft to demonstrate that Android is, in fact, costlier than Windows Phone 7.

Even Oracle recently sued Google over the use of Java in Android. Apple sued HTC a few months back, for patent infringement related to Android devices.

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Author: Pathik Google Profile for Pathik
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Pathik has written and can be contacted at pathik@techie-buzz.com.

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