Author: Shweta Ramdas
Beginning life as a grad student studying human genetics.

Shweta Ramdas has written and can be contacted at shweta@techie-buzz.com.
Image Credit: University of Michigan Health System

Researches have inserted a gene into mice that couldn’t smell which restores their ability to perceive odors.

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Crosstalk between two halves of a brain region has shown to be linked to arithmetic ability.

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This age-old conflict runs deep enough for evolution to have acted upon it! [Image Credit: towntopics]

Why do women stop reproducing around the age of 50? Conflict between mother-in-law and daughter-in law could explain this to an extent, according to evolutionary theory.

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Sleeping might be less wasteful that you thought. [Image Credit: wikipedia]

How much can our brain take in while we are sleeping? New experiments have shown that our brain can process smells and sounds that are presented during sleep, and remember this information on waking up.

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It isn't just sperm that is present in semen. A protein called NGF might stimulate production of eggs for the sperm to fuse with. [Image Credit: biology.ucsd.edu]

A protein in male semen can act on the female brain stimulating it to produce eggs.

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The four building blocks of DNA, also called bases (shown in green, red, yellow and blue) can be used as effective storage devices. [Image Credit: restlessmindboosters]

Books in a few decades might not be stored in their physical forms, or even in soft copies, but stored in the very molecules that design our body- DNA.

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The thick vessel is an artery in the brain of a mouse. In green is cerebrospinal fluid in a channel along the outside of the artery. [Image Credit: University of Rochester medical Center]

Researchers have discovered a hitherto unknown network of channels in the brain that help carry out excess proteins and solutes from brain tissue. These channels could be manipulated to control the movement of drugs, or harmful substances in disease.

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Photo courtesy of Bret Pasch.

A singing mouse is being studied to identify the functions of a gene that plays a role in human language. Of mice and men, indeed!

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Homo rudolfensis skull [Image Credit: Ohio State University]

The discovery of a new human-like fossil suggests that our ancestral species might have had cousins of their own.

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Behold the newest bird known to mankind [Image credit: Cornell University]

A new bird species has been discovered in the Andes mountains and has been called Capito fitzpatricki

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The lifespan of males is 5-10 years lower than that of females. Our mitochondria could hold the key to this number. [Image Credit: Wikipedia]

Women are known to live 5 to 10 years longer than men. One of the reasons for this asymmetery lies in genes inherited from our mothers.

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The Tagish Lake Meteorite, which showed an excess of 'L' aspartic acid, an amino acid. [Image Credit: wikipedia]

It has long been known that molecules within living organisms also possess the property of asymmetry, also called chirality.. An excess of ‘L’ amino acids, thought to be a property of life, have now been found in meteorites, which represent the universe before the origins of life.

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Having excellent autobiographical memory could be a result of your brain being structured differently. [Image Credit: flickr.com/digitalshotgun]

Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory is different from ordinary good memory, and has been linked to a difference in the structure of the brain.

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A cartoon depicting the coplanar orbits of our solar system. [Image Credit: universetoday, NASA/JPL-Caltech/T.Pyle]

Our solar system now has a cousin! Astrophysicists at the MIT have discovered another planetary system that resembles ours. Like in our solar system, the orbits of planets around the Kepler-30 star lie in a single plane.

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The brain is not very objective in its decision making. [Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons]

Recent experiments by researchers at Columbia University and New York University are showing that recognizing a familiar object versus creating a new memory is influenced by incidents prior to the decision, i.e. prior incidents bias our brain either towards forming a new memory or towards recalling an existing one.

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