Facebook Updates Hovercards; Displays Timeline Cover Photos

Facebook is seriously on fire. Lately, it has been releasing several series of new features and updates which are quite essential, although they are small and unnoticeable. Few moments back we reported that Facebook has added the new emoticons menu in the chat window for better communication among users while chatting.

Yet another new feature update that has been spotted is the hovercards – the small information box that appears when you hover over a profile name or a Facebook page. The hovercards have been upgraded to display the Timeline profile picture along with the cover photo of a user/page when you hover over the name.

Regardless of whether it is a user or a Facebook page, the hovercard will now show a smaller version of the cover photo, providing the viewer with more context on who they are, or what page it is.

The new hovercards are designed to look more like a business card rather than the hovercard itself. Take a look at the examples shown below, shared by Manoj on his blog Most viral Media.

Facebook Hovercards With Cover Photo

From the images above, you can see that the hovercard of a user contains the user’s profile pic, the name, current job/designation, including a thumbnail gallery of mutual friends. At the bottom, there are the two usual buttons – Message and Friends (used to indicate whether you are a friend of that person or not). The Facebook page hovercard on the other hand, contains a thumbnail gallery of users that have “liked” the page, name of the page, location, the fan page picture, including the Message and “Liked”/”Like” buttons.

Here’s how the older version of the hovercards look:

Facebook Old Hovercards

Although it looks pretty much same as the earlier version of the hovercard, the new one particularly has the cover photo displayed in the background. This update is yet to be made available for all users, and users who aren’t using the new Facebook Timeline, will have the older hovercard design, until they switch to Timeline and add a cover photo.

Facebook has been releasing a lot of new features, including some updates to its existing features. Recently, it made some changes to its notifications by allowing users to opt out of the unwanted and annoying notifications. We have also spotted a new feature that shows activity of recently logged in friends.

Facebook Brings Emoticons to Desktop Chat; Includes a New “Like” Icon

Lately, Facebook has been releasing a lot of new features, including some updates to its existing features. First we saw the announcement of the Facebook plugin for WordPress, followed by a “Call” button placed below the user’s cover photo in order to popularize the video chatting feature.

We then saw a new feature that shows activity of recently logged in friends, along with the new notification control that lets you opt out of useless notification from the drop down menu – a much needed feature. And not to forget, Facebook has also acquired the facial recognition technology company face.com with the deal closing somewhere between $55 and $60 million.

Interestingly, all of these features (including the acquisition) were released during this month itself. Those are a lot of new releases in a single month. However, that doesn’t stop right there. Today, the social networking giant made a post from its Facebook Tips account announcing the introduction emoticons to its desktop chat.

You can now easily add smiley faces and other emoticons to a conversation when you’re chatting with your friends. Look for the icon in the bottom right corner of your chat window and emote away.

Facebook- Emoticons List

Emoticons aren’t new to Facebook, however, the emoticons menu is something that wasn’t available before, and was a highly required detail for chatting. Earlier users had to smiley type in the smiley code, which then used to get converted to an emoticon automatically. This, however, did not show the list of emoticons supported in the chat, leading to which some of the users simply had guess the code to see if it worked or not.

Also Read: Facebook Chat Emoticon Trick: Use The Profile Photo Of A Person, Page Or Event In A Chat Message

Having realized the need of an emoticon menu (for better communication and adding appropriate emoticons), Facebook has introduced this new menu to its chat windows. Additionally, Facebook has added the “like” icon (thumbs-up icon), which users can use it by simply typing (y) – including parentheses.

Sadly, the kiss emoticon has gone missing. Perhaps Facebook does not want its users to kiss-kiss while chatting ;) However, users can still use it by typing the code :-*

The new emoticon menu is available in the desktop chat application (also within Facebook chat window), while it is unclear if Facebook is going to add the same to any of its mobile apps. Also, emoticons are not available on status updates. However, considering the rate at which Facebook is releasing such tiny updates, emoticons for status updates is very likely.

New Twitter Feature Separates Replies and Non-replies for Verified Accounts

Twitter has come up with an interesting solution that will simplify and ease the way of reading a user’s tweets. The new feature provides an option to separate the @ replies and non-replies in the Twitter timeline.

For instance, you visit a Twitter user’s profile and notice that the user has sent more @ replies than his/her original tweets. This not only buries the original and non-replied tweets, but also makes it difficult to dig them out. In order to separate the two, Twitter will be rolling out the “All” and “No Replies” link buttons, which will be placed right above the timeline. However, this will be available to only those accounts that are verified and have the verified Twitter badge.

This simplified profile, which we’re rolling out to verified accounts over the coming weeks, makes it easier to understand what kind of content the user shares on Twitter, and what Tweets you’ll see if you follow them.

New Twitter Feature - Filter Out @ Replies

To view only the original tweets from a verified Twitter user, you can simply click on the “No replies” button link. This will filter out all the conversation and @ replies, and displays only the original tweets from the user.

In a blog post, Twitter gives @bubbawatson, @NASCAR and @Pepsi as examples to explain how the feature exactly works. Once the feature is out, it will be enabled by default, with an option to see “all” tweets including @ replies with a link button shown above the timeline.

The feature is quite helpful to followers of popular Twitter users and celebrities. It will easily help followers to read the original tweets of their favourite Twitter accounts without having to splash through various mentions and replies to other tweets. Sometimes, that becomes more like a burden unless you’re from a spy agency who wants to read all the tweets of a user ;)

Nevertheless, this is a great feature and we hope that Twitter will enable this feature to all its users, which is very unlikely.

[via] [source]

American Rapper Vanilla Ice Responds to Death Hoax Spreading on Facebook

A new hoax message about Vanilla Ice being killed in a car crash is spreading across social media sites Facebook and Twitter. Messages circulating about his death are not true, as Robert Matthew Van Winkle a.k.a Vanilla Ice has confirmed in a tweet that he is alive, and the message spreading is a fake.

According to rumors, here’s how Vanilla Ice died:

Vanilla Ice died in a single vehicle crash on Route 80 between Morristown and Roswell. He was pronounced dead at the scene by paramedics responding to the vehicle accident and was identified by photo ID found on his body. Alcohol and drugs do not appear to have been a factor in this accident – June 17, 2012.

A version of the hoax spreading on Facebook has the title “Vanilla Ice Dies in Car Crash” along with a link to a website –

Vanilla Ice dies in car crash - Hoax

Clicking the link will lead you to a site where you’ll find the fake article containing the news about the death of the American rapper.

However, Vanilla Ice was quite surprised to learn about the “car crash” message, and spanked down the rumors that are spreading on Facebook and Twitter by sending out a tweet to his followers –

Vanilla Ice Tweet

Hoax messages like the one above (about the death of celebrity stars) isn’t something new. There have been several such hoax messages reportedly spreading and spamming the social networks. Some of which includes, Keanu Reeves Dies in Snowboard Accident, and International Rockstar Legend Jon Bon Jovi Dead at 49.

It is always advised that users verify such information before spreading it across to their friends. A quick search on Google will help you find out whether the message is a fake or not.

We at Techie Buzz always try to keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. You can follow our dedicated Facebook page where we report all spreading scams – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

Image credits: facecrooks.com

Facebook Testing “Call” Button on Timeline; Could Help Popularize Its Video Chat

A year ago, Facebook announced the video chatting feature powered by Microsoft-acquired Skype, which allowed Skype users to video chat with Facebook users within Skype itself. All that Skype users had to do is click on the Facebook icon on the left side of the screen, and allow Skype to access their Facebook information via the Facebook Connect button.

However, the feature didn’t really attract many users, and sources say that in order to increase video chat usage and popularize the little known feature, Facebook is testing it further by adding a “Call” button below the user’s cover photo on the profile page, right next to the “Message” button.  It is said that the motive behind adding this new button is to remind Facebook users that there is a feature called as video chat and users need to make use of it.

Fellow Techie Buzz author Parth Dhebar, notified us about the new “Call” button, however, Tech Crunch was the first to report the feature publicly in a blog post. Facebook Testing "Call" Button

Ever since Google+ Hangouts made its debut, the video chatting feature for Google+ has attracted several users. Perhaps Facebook has now realized that the video chatting feature needs to be emphasized more and needs to get more users use the feature. This could also be a threat to Facebook, since it could lose several users to Google Plus.

Currently, users can see the video chat button only in chat windows, and that is the only way to start a video chat with someone. Adding a “Call” button on user’s profile page seems apt, however, it still goes unnoticeable. Perhaps, Facebook should consider replacing its annoying Ticker widget on the right, and add buttons such as “Call” to highlight it and several other features that Facebook offers.

Unlike Google+ Hangouts, Facebook’s video chat does not support group video chat yet. Facebook had promised group video chat after the integration with Skype. This is yet another reason Facebook needs to take into consideration if they really want to increase the popularity of its video chat feature. Other features including, Facebook-to-Skype calling, and paid Facebook to standard phone number audio calling are yet to debut.

Facebook to Donate 50 Cents for Every “Like” – Hoax

There is a new hoax message that is spreading across Facebook, and it isn’t any different from the other hoax and spam messages. The new hoax message claims that Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has apparently “agreed” to donate 50 cents for every “like” the photo gets, eventually helping to raise funds for abused wife “Isabella.” However, none of it is true.

Here’s the message that is spreading along with the photo a link to YouTube video –

Facebook to Donate 50 cents to Isabella

Her name is isabella, she was abused at home by her husband every single day because she didn’t cook dinner for him, her doctor mark grant said she has a broken bone and ankle and they will need $200,000 by 19th June for her operation, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerburg has agreed to donate 50 cents for every like this photo gets, one like wont hurt, so please like if you have a heart.. do not ignore this. Men should NOT abuse their wife.

Watch the PROOF of the video on YouTube of her husband abusing her at home, has been sentenced for 20 years now — > [link]

It’s funny to see that the creator of this hoax message couldn’t even spell Mark Zuckerberg’s name correctly.

The link to the YouTube video is nothing related to a husband accusing his wife or anything of that sort, but instead leads to a video in which two lunatic girls are making an attempt to be funny. Perhaps the primary motive behind this hoax message is to generate Facebook “likes” and video views on YouTube.

Also, Mark Zuckerberg or Facebook does not make any such donations by getting users to “like” or “share” a photo or message. This isn’t something new as we have seen several such hoax and spam messages spreading across the social network.

It is always advised that users verify such information before spreading it across to their friends. A quick search on Google will help you find out whether the message is a fake or not.

We at Techie Buzz always try to keep you updated with the latest scams spreading on Facebook. You can follow our dedicated Facebook page where we report all spreading scams – Techie Buzz Scam Monitor.

Linkedin Confirms Security Breach; Check if Your Password Was Stolen

Earlier this morning a hacker from Russia claimed to have hacked into LinkedIn and managed to steal around 6.46 million hashed passwords, and his fellow hackers have decrypted most of the hashed passwords. LinkedIn, on the other side, took a while to confirm the security breach. In a blog post, nearly after 12 hours, the social media company confirmed that the there was a security breach and “some” passwords were stolen. LinkedIn Director, Vicente Silveira, made the announcement in a postover at the LinkedIn Blog:

We want to provide you with an update on this morning’s reports of stolen passwords. We can confirm that some of the passwords that were compromised correspond to LinkedIn accounts.

Vicente also added the following steps for the compromised accounts:

  1. Members that have accounts associated with the compromised passwords will notice that their LinkedIn account password is no longer valid.
  2. These members will also receive an email from LinkedIn with instructions on how to reset their passwords. There will not be any links in this email. Once you follow this step and request password assistance, then you will receive an email from LinkedIn with a password reset link.
  3. These affected members will receive a second email from our Customer Support team providing a bit more context on this situation and why they are being asked to change their passwords.

Although the hackers did not release any usernames associated with the passwords, all LinkedIn users are asked to immediately change their account passwords. It is also an alert for those users who have used the same password on different website. However, if you’re worried that you may be one among the 6.46 million compromised accounts, then you can confirm it by using a tool released by LastPass. Check If Your LinkedIn Password Was Stolen All you need to do is enter your LinkedIn password in the LastPass’s tool and click on the “Test My Password” button. The tool automatically computes its SHA-1 hash and sends the result to LastPass.com to search the list of 6.46 million leaked password hashes. The security tool is safe and does not store any password that users enter. It is also recommended that you use a password management tool like LastPass, which allows you to manage your passwords and form data, allowing you to easily fill inane forms with the click of a button. Also Read: Lastpass Extension for Google Chrome

6.46 Million Hashed LinkedIn Passwords Stolen; Hackers Trying to Decrypt Them

[Update 2]

LinkedIn has confirmed the security breach. Read the full story here.

[Update] 

LinkedIn Director, Vicente Silveira, has posted a blog post on how users can update their password on LinkedIn along with some recommended account security and privacy tips. The update also indicates that LinkedIn’s “security team continues to investigate this morning’s reports of stolen passwords. At this time, we’re still unable to confirm that any security breach has occurred.”

[Original]

Yet another security problem that LinkedIn users could face. A user in a Russian forum claims to have hacked into LinkedIn, and has leaked a 118 MB hash file containing passwords of more than 6.4 million LinkedIn users. The user uploaded the file on the Russian forum and his fellow mates are trying to decrypt the hash file.

LinkedIn posted an update on Twitter stating that its team is looking into reports of stolen passwords, however, they haven’t confirmed any security breach yet. It is said that there is a possibility that this could be a hoax, however, according to The Verge, several LinkedIn users have said on Twitter that they found their real LinkedIn passwords as hashes on the list.

Linkedin Twitter Updates

Sophos, a security research company, has confirmed that the hash file contains valid LinkedIn passwords, however, the LinkedIn team is still figuring out if there was a security breach or not. The Russian hacker has uploaded over 6,458,020 hashed passwords, but no usernames are found. It is unclear if the hacker has also managed to obtain usernames, but it’s likely that he might have managed to obtain them.

According to CNET, “LinkedIn passwords are encrypted using an algorithm known as SHA-1, which is considered very secure. Complex passwords will likely take some time to decrypt, but simple ones may be at risk.”

According to LinkedIn’s latest tweet, “Our team continues to investigate, but at this time, we’re still unable to confirm that any security breach has occurred. Stay tuned here”, shows that the social network has not found any evidence as such. It could also mean that the Russian hacker and the other hackers were mistaken that the hashes were LinkedIn passwords.

LinkedIn currently has over 150 million users. Although 6 million is a small number of users, however, it still is unacceptable that such a security breach has taken place. This is a developing story, and we will update this post when more information is available.

As a precautionary measure, it is recommended that all LinkedIn users change their password immediately.  If you’ve been using the same password on other websites, then it is highly recommended that you change them too.

Fake ‘Privacy Notice’ Irks Facebook; Users Worried

Like I said in my previous post, Facebook is the best place to spread rumors and hoax messages to thousands of people in no time. This is one of the biggest problems with Facebook, where users inevitably spread messages that look controversial, but are baseless and have nothing in common with reality.

A “Facebook privacy notice” has gone viral on the social networking site through status updates and “shares” in the past few days. The so-called “privacy notice” reads as follows:

Facebook is now a publicly traded entity. Unless you state otherwise, anyone can infringe on your right to privacy once you post to this site. It is recommended that you and other members post a similar notice as this, or you may copy and paste this version. If you do not post such a statement once, then you are indirectly allowing public use of items such as your photos and the information contained in your status updates. worriedFacebook Privacy

PRIVACY NOTICE: Warning — any person and/or institution and/or agent and/or agency of any governmental structure including but not limited to the United States Federal Government also using or monitoring/using this website or any of its associated websites, you do NOT have my permission to utilize any of my profile information nor any of the content contained herein including, but not limited to my photos, and/or the comments made about my photos or any other “picture” art posted on my profile.

You are hereby notified that you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing, disseminating, or taking any other action against me with regard to this profile and the contents herein. The foregoing prohibitions also apply to your employee, agent, student or any personnel under your direction or control.

The contents of this profile are private and legally privileged and confidential information, and the violation of my personal privacy is punishable by law. UCC 1-103 1-308 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED WITHOUT PREJUDICE. (M)

The above spreading viral message is a hoax and none of it is true. The main idea behind this post, whosoever started it, is based on the fact about Facebook’s recent listing as a publicly traded company, which according to the rumor indicates that it will affect its users’ privacy. However, this is simply a wrong assumption.

Although Facebook became a publicly traded company last month, it has not made any changes to its privacy policy, and makes it a top priority to keep user information safe and secured. If Facebook ever makes any changes to the privacy policy, it would definitely notify all its users about the changes. So, don’t panic!

Additionally, the Uniform Commercial Codes cited at the end of the post, “UCC 1-103 1-308″ is completely unrelated to Facebook’s privacy policy, and thus making its inclusion irrelevant.

This rumor is very much similar to “Facebook or its third-party advertisers to user photos in ads“, which also has been reportedly spreading rapidly on the social networking giant.

Here’s an update that Facebook posted:

We have noticed a recent status update that is being widely shared implying the ownership of your Facebook content has recently changed. This is not true and has never been the case.

Facebook Privacy

Facebook Will Not Use Your Photos in Advertisements

The best place to instantly spread rumors and hoax messages is Facebook. The social networking giant’s “Share” and “Like” buttons are so powerful that they are enough to spread a message to nearly thousands of people in no time. Sometimes they’re so powerful, controversial hoax messages are gifted with eternal life. That is, they never stop spreading.

For instance, the following message has been spreading on Facebook ever since it was first posted on the networking giant –

On Friday, Facebook will start using your photos in ads that appear on the profile of your contacts. It is legal and what is listed when you open an account. To prevent this do the following: Go to “Account Settings”, click on “Facebook Adverts” on the left, then click “edit third party advert settings” and choose No One, then save changes

Facebook to Use Profile Photos in Ads - Hoax

Perhaps it is now almost three years since the message has been spreading on Facebook despite many social media blogs having reported that it is a rumor. However, users on Facebook are continuing to fall for the false message and are spreading the message even today.

The message was spreading so intensely the Facebook team had no choice, but only to alert it users. Back in 2009, Facebook’s ex Corporate Communications Director, Barry Schnitt (now hired by Pinterest) wrote a blog post indicating that the above spreading message is simply a rumor and baseless –

“In the past couple of days, a rumor has begun spreading that claims we have changed our policies for third-party advertisers and the use of your photos. These rumors are false, and we have made no such change in our advertising policies.”

However, that didn’t make any difference. The rumor has continued spreading till date.

So, what’s with this “Facebook will start using your photos in ads”, or “change in advertising policies” all about? According to Facebook’s advertising guidelines, Facebook prohibits advertisers from using user information collected from a Facebook ad, or incorporate them in ads.

Now, since Facebook strictly prohibits advertisers from using user data, spammers took advantage of this and tried spreading a controversial message by stating that Facebook updated their advertising policy, and is now allowing advertisers to use user information, including profile photos. However, none of this is true.

Facebook has never allowed advertisers to use user data in advertisements. However, if in case Facebook does provide ad networks the right to use your name or picture in ads, then you can always determine how your information is used in the Facebook Ads settings page. All you need to do is select “No one” and you’re information is never shared in advertisements.