iPhone 5 Has 1GB of RAM

On Wednesday, Apple announced the iPhone 5. The new iPhone offers some incredible new improvements including the use of a new A6 processor. It has been widely rumored that Apple would increase the RAM in the new iPhone from 512MB to 1GB, but there wasn’t any confirmation. The iPhone 4S and iPhone 4 both offer 512MB RAM.

iFan first posted confirmation that the iPhone 5 has 1GB of RAM based on the part numbers listed on the A6 chip itself. After a bit of research, iFixit was also able to confirm their findings, using Samsung’s own product guides. The chart shown below is from Samsung’s 2012 Product Solutions Guide (PDF) which lists part numbers of various memory parts they have for sale.

The part numbers of the iPhone 5’s A6 match with the group of 8 Gigabit mobile DRAMs which translates into 1GB of RAM.

People Are Desensitized to Product Evolution

Quite a lot of vocal people on social networks are, anyways.

When Apple executives took the stage yesterday to officially announce the iPhone 5, many were underwhelmed, with a feeling of “that’s it?”

This could partially be due to the early leaks over the past few months that preceded the device, but even that only played a relatively small part in it. It’s not a new phenomenon, and we’ve seen it with, well, almost every iPhone release following the first in 2007. Especially with more incremental updates to the device, such as the 3GS and 4S.

Another part of it could be the questioning of Apple’s approach to products, which was even experienced by the first-generation iPhone. What I mean is, the company doesn’t pride itself on being the first to certain features, but rather the best. This approach may not be favorable to enthusiasts who want to have the latest technology as soon as possible, but it clearly works just fine with the masses. To me, this approach can be debated on a case-by-case basis. Sometimes, the amount of time that it takes for Apple to implement something (the ability to take panoramic photos from the native camera app, for example), can be perplexing. One more significant feature that enthusiasts are questioning the omission of in the iPhone 5 is NFC, which fellow writer Manan wrote about on his Svbtle blog.

When the first iPhone was released, it lacked a number of features that competing smartphones on the market already offered, and yet it was still loved by consumers and clearly changed the face of the mobile industry. Apple’s strategy is to focus on getting core features right — nailing the user experience of said features — then playing catch up to implement other features from competing devices. So yes, part of the criticism — from enthusiasts, at least — is based on “x already has this feature, so why should we care again?”

But there’s another, far more significant factor at play here that has little to do with the actual merits of the evolutionary device itself.

Like a drug where people just can’t seem to once again experience the feeling of the first high, people are hoping to relive the experience of the first iPhone announcement with each new iPhone. People passionate about Apple — and even just technology in general — are hoping that the company will reveal something that’s completely game-changing. Something that changes everything once again. Average consumers also want a very, very significant update to the device to justify purchasing it.

Even though Apple changed almost everything with the new iPhone — increased display, better display, revamped design, better camera, new adapter, battery improvements, new headphones, iOS 6 — people are still underwhelmed because these are all things that they expect. Faster, thinner, better battery life, better display; these are all things that we’ve grown to become entitled to of incremental phone updates.

Here’s an excellent analogy that compares Apple’s school of thought with the Porsche 911. While remaining, in a way, similar to the first incarnation, significant steps forward were taken throughout its gradual evolution.

The iPhone 5 is a colossal — still evolutionary — update that was inevitable, really, but people are still underwhelmed. And it’s not because the new device sucks, or lacks NFC, or has too large/small of a screen. It’s because people are desensitized to these incremental, evolutionary updates — no matter how good they may be — and are waiting for Apple to do something revolutionary.

Apple Announces September 19th Release Date for iOS 6

Today, during Apple’s media event, the company announced that iOS 6, which was announced in June at the company’s WWDC keynote event, will be available on September 19th.

iOS 6 will offer 200 new features. Siri will be enhanced to offer movie information, sport scores, and the option to easily post to Facebook and Twitter. In addition, the Passbook app will hold tickets, passes, and payment cards for participating businesses. Also, Safari will offer full-screen mode for better browsing and iCloud tabs to save your open tabs and offer immediate access to them on your other iOS devices and your computer.

Another great new feature in iOS 6 is the new maps app. The new maps app will offer turn-by-turn directions and a new 3D flyover feature to show a more realistic view of buildings and land features. Facebook has also been integrated into iOS 6, with the option to post Photo Stream pictures straight to Facebook and status updates via Siri.

iOS 6 will be available as a free download for the iPhone 4S, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS, new iPad, iPad 2 and 4th generation iPod touch. The iPhone 5 will ship with iOS 6.


Apple Reveals 4″ iPod Touch, Multitouch iPod Nano

Not only did Apple reveal the incredible new iPhone 5 during its keynote today, but the company also announced an updated iPod touch and iPod nano line up. The new iPod touch offers a 4″ screen and is only 6.1mm thin and just 88 grams. The iPod touch also contains the A5 processor. Apple has also improved battery life in the iPod touch. The company promises 40 hours of music playback, and 8 hours of video, which is an improvement over the 4th generation iPod touch.

The new iPod touch’s camera has also been significantly improved. The back camera is much improved to a 5-megapixel, backside illuminated, f/2.4, 5-element lens, with the same sapphire crystal lens cover as the iPhone 5. The front camera has also been upgraded to a 720p camera. Apple’s new iPod touch also supports the new Panorama feature and also includes Siri. Finally, there’s also a hidden feature on the back of the new iPod Touch, called the Loop. It’s designed to hook to a wrist-strap for added security.

Apple’s new iPod touch will be offered in five colors and will be available in October at $299 (32GB) and $399 (64GB). The 4th Generation iPod Touch will remain at $199 (16GB. Preorders for the new iPod Touch begin September 14th.

Apple also announced a radically redesigned iPod nano. The new iPod nano has a 2.5″ screen and multi-touch interface. The iPod nano includes an FM tuner, widescreen video, pedometer, Bluetooth, and the new Lightning connector. The new iPod nano is offered in seven colors and will be available in October for $149. Preorders for the new iPod Nano begin September 14th.

Viewpoint: Dan Lyons’ Articles No Longer Excite

In less than an hour, Apple will unveil the next iPhone. And, as with all Apple releases, certain bloggers are seizing the moment to drive traffic to their sites by writing posts that cast a cloud of doubt and claim that the product at hand will be a complete and utter failure. One writer Dan Lyons is claiming that iPhone launches are no longer exciting. Several jabs were taken at Apple — some of which I agree with — while others are meritless, and seemingly crafted for the sole reason of being provocative.

If that’s correct, I imagine Steve is not happy. First of all, he’d be furious about the leaks. Steve liked surprising people.

I find it hilarious how the theme of this article is what Steve Jobs would hypothetically think of Apple’s actions if he were still around. Jobs specifically didn’t want people asking “WWJD” after his time at the company, and you’d think that someone who created a satirical blog around him would know this. I agree with the point of this statement though. The leaks are surprising for Apple, and, while I doubt they will diminish sales in any way, it’s really an usual thing for a company that’s notoriously silent and (mostly) leak-free while new products are brewing.

This is the sixth version of the iPhone, and the user interface still looks almost exactly like the original iPhone in 2007.

The hardware on the iPhone has been the same for two years, since the iPhone 4 and 4S were virtually identical.

Dan Lyons seems to have an aversion to incremental updates. The 3G and 3GS were virtually identical. I’m astonished that people didn’t get bored then, taking it as a sign that Apple isn’t going to produce some mind-blowing, market-changing iteration of the device every single year. We should all have abandoned the platform back then.

Now, having had two years to plot and scheme, Apple’s renowned designer Jonathan Ive has replaced the tiny 3.5in (8.9cm) screen with a slightly-less-tiny 4in (10.2cm) screen? Wow. Knock me over with a feather. What do you do with the rest of your time, Jony?

There appears to be correlation between increased screen size and Jony Ive’s work ethic. We should investigate Samsung for unfair worker treatment; I weep for the designer of the Galaxy Note. He must have been chained to a pole 24/7, slaving to produce such a large screen. In fact, has Lyons designed any large screens? What do you do with your time, sir?

But seriously, Jony was probably too busy authoring some parody blog.

This is what happens when a company is too cheap to invest in research and development. Did you know that Apple spends far less on R&D than any of its rivals – a paltry 2% of revenues, versus 14% for Google and Microsoft?

They seem to be spending that 2% quite well, seeing that their products have set the tone of entire markets.

No wonder the Android platform, where new models appear every week, now represents 68% of the smartphone market, up from 47% a year ago, while Apple slid to 17% over the same period.

Market share is definitely an important benchmark, but it’s not everything. I partially agree with what Gruber said in a post back in January addressing this very matter. What Apple has is a mind-blowing profit share.

Worse, despite all its bluster about innovation, Apple has become a copycat, and not even a good one. Why is Apple making the iPhone bigger? To keep up with the top Android phones.

(Phones that, mind you, Apple fanboys ridiculed at first.)

I like it how you accuse Apple of not thoroughly copying Android devices. If they were complete copycats, they’d be creating a 4.8″ or larger device. They’ve clearly spent time mulling over the issue of screen size.

I don’t personally prefer devices with extremely large screen sizes (I think that the Lumia 900’s screen is kind of the max for me; anything else is excessive.) However, it is a growing trend that consumers are leaning towards phones that are at least 4 inches in size, and I think that, if they do want to increase the screen size of the devices, 4 inches is a comfortable compromise. Also, if the leaks look accurate, they didn’t increase the width of the device. It is slightly quirky — I’ve joked on Twitter that it resembles longcat — but this way, it still (in theory) should feel comfortable in hand.

Apple also has become a copycat in tablets. Jobs once said the iPad’s 9.7in screen was the perfect size, and smaller tablets made no sense. Then the Android camp had success with 7in tablets like Amazon’s Kindle Fire and Google’s Nexus 7, and now Apple supposedly will announce its own smaller iPad in October. Talk about thinking different!

The company is no stranger to 180-degree turns from firm stances. And, in this case, yes, devices like the Kindle Fire and Nexus 7 have defined the market. But let’s be clear, they’re not entering this market out of desperation, that’s for sure.

Um, Siri still doesn’t work. The oft-rumoured Apple TV doesn’t exist yet, presumably because media companies won’t let Apple take over their business.

Agreed about Siri. But criticizing Apple for a TV, a device that exists only in rumors? Huh?

The latest batch of Apple ads were such embarrassing garbage that Apple had to take them down from YouTube.

Agreed, the ads were shit.

To use a car analogy, six years ago the iPhone was like a sexy new flagship model from BMW or Porsche. Today it’s a Toyota Camry. Safe, reliable, boring. The car your mom drives. The car that’s so popular that its maker doesn’t dare mess with the formula.

That’s funny. According to the very market share statistics that were just pointed out, Android is more popular than iOS. And has the iPhone not come far from its original model back in 2007?

I could make a few car analogies comparing the iPhone — and Windows Phone, while we’re at it — to luxury automobiles, but that would make me an elitist.

Somewhere up there, I can hear Steve screaming.

Hm, weird, I don’t hear anything.

Google Launches Native YouTube App for iPhone

Earlier this year, we reported that the YouTube app from iOS 6 had been removed due to the end of licensing terms. At that time, Google promised that a native iOS apps was in the works. Today, Google has released a new native YouTube app for iPhone. YouTube had previously been one of the built-in iOS apps since the original iPhone launch.

The app is available via the App Store and is a free download. However, the app does have ads in order to support the “tens of thousands” of new videos. Currently, the app does not support the iPad, but the NY Times reports that a native iPad app is in the works.

For the first time in a native iOS experience, YouTube will show pre-roll adds ahead of its mobile videos. That’s the bad news.

The good news is that with more monetization comes more content. Thanks to mobile ad capabilities baked into its own app, YouTube will unlock tens of thousands of music videos from VEVO and others that were not viewable on the old app.

I have been using the app since last night and really like it. The app’s icon needs a lot of work though.

Production of 13-Inch Retina MacBook Pro and Updated iMacs Reportedly Ramping Up

Late last month, NPD DisplaySearch analyst Richard Shim claimed that suppliers had begun production on 2,560 by 1,600 high resolution displays for a rumored 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display. Today, Digitimes reports that full production on the 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro is on its way with shipments from Apple’s supply chain beginning to ramp up ahead of a speculated September or October launch.

The report also claims that production on updated iMacs are ramping up. Digitimes also reports that Apple maybe facing difficulties with its high-end iMac models. If Apple is indeed encountering difficulties with new displays, it is unclear on how the company will handle the launch.

As for the iMac, Apple originally planned to release three new models with upgraded panels and CPUs, but due to poor yields of the panels, the mass production of the high-end model, has been postponed, without any launch schedule. The other two models – targeting the mid-range and entry-level segments – saw shipment volumes from the supply chain increase in September.

Digitimes’s track record is known to be unreliable, but it does sometimes offer correct information and guidance on other reports.

Rumor: Next-gen iPhone to Support “Around the World” LTE

Yesterday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Apple maybe looking to create a radio streaming service to rival current services like Pandora. Today, WSJ is reports that Apple’s upcoming iPhone will support 4G LTE networks around the world. Citing people familiar with the matter, the report notes that the next-generation iPhone will offer compatibility with 4G LTE networks in the U.S., Europe, and Asia. However, the functionality may not be available to all countries and carriers at launch.

Apple Inc.’s next iPhone will work on the fastest wireless networks around the world—including in the U.S., Europe and Asia—though it is unlikely to be available on every carrier, people familiar with the matter said.


It isn’t likely to work with all carriers’ LTE networks in all countries, the people said, though it wasn’t clear which would be left out.

The first Apple device to support high-speed 4G LTE networks was the third-generation iPad, which supported AT&T and Verizon’s network, but did not work internationally. Apple is expected to reveal the next-generation iPhone on September 12th.

Rumor: Apple Working on Pandora-Like Music Service?

The Wall Street Journal reports that Apple may be looking to create a radio streaming service to rival current services like Pandora in an attempt to protect its position as the world’s largest music dealer. Supposedly, the company is already in talks with content owners.

The report claims that a service like this would work across Apple’s line of products including Macs, the iPhone and the iPad, and possibly even Windows PCs. People familiar with the matter said that the service will offer virtual stations to play music on a web browser or via dedicated apps. Unsurprisingly, Android is not expected to receive access. Sources also said that Apple is looking to strike deals which would allow users to skip songs and eliminate other restrictions on internet radio services.

The New York Times also reports on these developments citing “three people briefed on Apple’s plans”. The report is a similar description of Apple’s goals and noted that the service would likely be offered as an app that could interface with a user’s iTunes Store account to build upon the current Genius functionality in iTunes.

Apple Responds to UDID Leak

A couple of days ago, it was reported that hacker group AntiSec claimed to have obtained millions of unique device identifiers for Apple devices (UDIDs) from an FBI laptop. The group posted download links to an 89 megabyte file to PasteBin, which consisted the list of UDIDs. Today, AllThingsD reports that Apple has responded by saying that the company did not provide the FBI with the information.

The FBI has not requested this information from Apple, nor have we provided it to the FBI or any organization. Additionally, with iOS 6 we introduced a new set of APIs meant to replace the use of the UDID and will soon be banning the use of UDID,” Apple spokesperson Natalie Kerris told AllThingsD.

However, where the data exactly came from still remains unknown. Apple has been working to get rid of the use of UDIDs. The company has created tools to allow developers track usage of their apps on a per-device basis.